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EFF: the Final Leaked TPP Text Is All That We Feared (eff.org) 399

An anonymous reader writes: Wikileaks has released the finalized Intellectual Property text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which international negotiators agreed upon a few days ago. Unfortunately, it contains many of the consumer-hostile provisions that so many organizations spoke out against beforehand. This includes the extension of the copyright term to life plus 70 years, and a ban on the circumvention of DRM. The EFF says, "If you dig deeper, you'll notice that all of the provisions that recognize the rights of the public are non-binding, whereas almost everything that benefits rightsholders is binding. That paragraph on the public domain, for example, used to be much stronger in the first leaked draft, with specific obligations to identify, preserve and promote access to public domain material. All of that has now been lost in favor of a feeble, feel-good platitude that imposes no concrete obligations on the TPP parties whatsoever." The EFF walks us through all the other awful provisions as well — it's quite a lengthy analysis.
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EFF: the Final Leaked TPP Text Is All That We Feared

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  • Kill it with fire! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:18PM (#50696705)

    Before it lays eggs!

  • US to be Blamed (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rtb61 ( 674572 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:20PM (#50696715) Homepage

    The most ignorant thing about pushing all this in the current global climate with the contortionists US twisting with regard to Islamic Fundamentalist Terrorist/Rebels, everyone will blame America and Americans, everything bad in the TPP and it's ugly sibling TTIP will be blamed on American corporations and sales will suffer accordingly. Want your citizens and country to maintain any semblance of freedom boycott Large US Corporations (small ones run by real Americans apparently are fine, so oddly enough help America rebuild Main Street and protect you own country by working together globally to gut Wall Street).

    • Re:US to be Blamed (Score:5, Interesting)

      by arbiter1 ( 1204146 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:41PM (#50696805)
      Biggest ones to blame is the Obama admin
      • Re:US to be Blamed (Score:5, Insightful)

        by amiga3D ( 567632 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:11PM (#50696951)

        This kind of shit always has big bipartisan support. The whores from both parties will put away the facade and do the bidding of their masters.

        • Yes because that's the election reality they're living in. But only one side is trying to take the shackles off [breitbart.com].
        • by Anonymous Coward

          Obama and his people in the Commerce and State departments (which he, as President, appointed and controls) are the ones who have (A) Negotiated this deal, (B) classified it to prevent the public from reading it, and (C) demanded the TPA bill earlier this year to put it on a fast-track to fly through congress without proper Constitutional scrutiny.

          Sadly, "establishment" Republicans in congress (bribed by the same firms that funded Obama's rise to power) ignored their base voters and let him have TPA, and

        • This kind of shit always has big bipartisan support.

          Maybe this "shit" has bipartisan support. But Obama ran on a platform, and was elected, to end this "shit", and as a liberal, progressive, biracial constitutional law professor and community organizer, he had about the best possible credentials for the job.

          The lesson to be learned is not that America needs an even better leader than Obama or that Obama was insufficiently liberal/progressive/socialist. The lesson to be learned is that you can't fix crony ca

          • by amiga3D ( 567632 )

            I'm all for that but we're the minority. My political leanings are mostly conservative but all the supposed conservatives elected in the last few decades want to grow government. They're fake. Under conservatives and liberals alike the damn monster just gets bigger and hungrier. Bush Junior grew the damn government like never before. He was a disaster and the one that followed him has continued driving the car over the cliff with the pedal to the metal. And they wonder why Trump is leading.

    • How? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:01PM (#50696915)
      I don't know about you, but 90% of the things I buy to live (Food, Toiletries, shelter) are owned and made by 13 companies. Unless you can afford really expensive boutique goods how the hell do you boycott? And if you can afford that TPP is good for you...

      Better yet, tell me how to get the churches and their blue collar workers back on track with socialism? How do I remove abortion as a wedge issue? I'm singling that one out since the left dropped guns and the right seems to be losing homosexuality and racism (and the welfare queens) as their wedge issues. It's the last major one I know of that divides our working class. Tell me how the hell to fix our politics...
      • "90% of the things I buy to live (Food, Toiletries, shelter) are owned and made by 13 companies."

        It seems that the U.S. government now only helps rich people become richer. There is no democracy.

        Companies That Control the World's Food [247wallst.com] (That is the 2nd page of the article.)

        Food Processing's top 100 [foodprocessing.com]
        • The US Gov't still does a lot of things to help the poor. Studies show that anti-poverty programs work. The Sentiments your expressing are just playing into the hands of the 1%ers who want to cut those programs without touching their own. Gov't is a dangerous tool like fire and guns. You regulated it and control it, but you don't just cast it aside.
      • by symbolic ( 11752 )

        > I don't know about you, but 90% of the things I buy to live (Food, Toiletries, shelter) are owned and made by 13 companies

        Maybe you can't stop buying from all 13, but try one or two. Seriously. I've done it. It's not that hard.

      • Re:How? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Tom ( 822 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @02:56AM (#50697801) Homepage Journal

        I don't know about you, but 90% of the things I buy to live (Food, Toiletries, shelter) are owned and made by 13 companies. Unless you can afford really expensive boutique goods how the hell do you boycott? And if you can afford that TPP is good for you...

        For food, you can go to local markets and buy it directly from farmers. At least here in Europe you can.

        There are also local products in many categories, but they are often more expensive and sometimes only available in select shops (look for eco shops and sustainable products, that's a first pointer). But again, in this area there is so much scamming from big companies that you have to do research to be sure.

        And that's the problem. We don't want to do that. We don't give enough of a fuck about the stuff we eat or use to care where it actually comes from.

        Tell me how the hell to fix our politics...

        Give back your nerd card. Robert Heinlein wrote a little book in fucking 1946 about this very problem, and little has changed since then:

        https://www.goodreads.com/book... [goodreads.com]

        • "For food, you can go to local markets and buy it directly from farmers."

          Depends on country. Simple economy of scale means small farms are in a slow process of decline - the farmer with a few traditional chicken enclosures cannot hope to compete with the farm that has ten massive industrial barns and chickens in the millions. Large farms have no interest in selling a tiny fraction of their output direct to consumers - they are not in the retail business.

    • Re:US to be Blamed (Score:5, Insightful)

      by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @10:40PM (#50697229) Journal

      small ones run by real Americans apparently are fine

      What the fuck is a "real American"? Is it the Canadian-born son of a Cuban refugee who's running for President? Is it the naturalized Iraqi-American who owns a convenience store? How about an Australian who owns some of the most powerful media outlets in the US along with a Saudi prince?

      Please enlighten us.

      I'm all for gutting Wall Street, but when I hear that kind of populism paired up with phrases like "real American" I kind of get the willies.

  • by Opportunist ( 166417 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:21PM (#50696725)

    I consider it well inside my rights to ignore your laws.

    In less martial words, issuing laws that contravene the consensus of the population is dangerous. Laws are upheld mostly because people consider them good, not because they are being enforce. Look around you and ponder which laws are upheld (in general) and which one are flauntingly broken. Do you see people go on murdering sprees, bank robberies or even do some minor shit like pushing grannies out of the way? No. Why? Not because they're forbidden, but because they go against the "general moral consensus", for a lack of a better term. People in general consider this "wrong". Yes, they are also illegal, but that doesn't matter too much.

    On the other hand, people of all times have broken laws without remorse if those laws were considered unjust. From speeding to copyright to drugs, all covered by laws with fines and punishment that are in no remotely sensibly proportion to the crime involved, laws being ignored and broken routinely by people you would otherwise consider upstanding, moral and law abiding.

    The actual danger here is in the view people get on laws in general.

    If you need an example for this, look no further than the former Communist Bloc. People in there quickly noticed that the laws are not there to protect them from "bad people", but to protect the state against them. Which in turn led to a corruption without parallel, because the average citizen's attitude was "why bother giving a shit about the state if it doesn't give one about me?".

    And we can have that too. If we insist in installing more and more laws that work against our population. People already don't ask what "they can do for their country" anymore. Oppression and trying to enforce even more ridiculously anti-population laws will only increase resistance to them, to the point where people will actually resent and oppose the state as much as people in the former East Bloc did resent and oppose their state.

    Ok, we cannot flee to a west. There is none.

    But there's always necks to be severed.

    • by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:31PM (#50696769)

      Of course, we theoretically have the option to complain to our elected representatives or vote them out of office, something not possible in the former Soviet Bloc. The snag is that most people don't bother doing this, and most probably never even heard of this issue. Those that do care about the issue may be saying "meh, I'll just pirate things like I always do" which is no help at all.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        How cute. You actually think you have political power.

        I'm sure the megacorps and .1 percenters are quaking in their boots at your impotent threat.

      • by sumdumass ( 711423 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:50PM (#50696861) Journal

        I've watched 3 different people in different settings go off about this to others. They have half the facts and half the fallacy along with all the hyperbole.

        The problem is a communications problem. It gets so technical that most people gloss over and ignore it until something strike their ears but then they only catch half. Most people are like the GP and when they attempt to communicate about it, they end up looking like a loon freshly dipped in dingbat shit and people ignore them again.

        What is needed is a cartoonish but reasonably well articulated summery of the situation and most people would grab their pitchforks and join the mob. I don't see that happening. Probably because they have been invested so long that it in and of itself seems engagingly ridiculous.

        • by swm ( 171547 ) <swmcd@world.std.com> on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:06PM (#50696929) Homepage

          Economix explains the Trans-Pacific Partnership
          http://economixcomix.com/home/... [economixcomix.com]

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Babel-17 ( 1087541 )
            I just want to thank you for sharing that link. I've since passed it on to another site where it's gotten dozens of views. After a decade or more of anonymously browsing this site I had /. send me a link so I could log in again, so I can say "Thanks!".
        • by s.petry ( 762400 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:31PM (#50697037)

          You don't see it happening because very few people know about it. Do you think that the lack of media coverage is accidental? Oh I know, Ben Carson the Republican candidate said something loony about having to attack a gunman on a spree just to kill, so that has to take all 7 "News" stations days to investigate and discuss. TPPIP? Not a word could be heard on any of those stations about that one. Amazingly, the candidates are not discussing it or being quoted on that one either.

          Oh but Donal Trump this and that, and of course everyone is just mean to Hillary because in all the time she served as Secretary of State she never ever sent or received even 1 classified email.

          The game is rigged pretty heavily today. People would probably shit themselves if they really know how much they are being manipulated. But hell, Facebook does not show anything too important in their feeds, and Facebook taking over control of that was accidental too.

          That rant is not really directed at you. It is directed at those who are now wearing that same tin-foil hat they accused others of wearing. I hope it fits them well.

          • by sumdumass ( 711423 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @10:38PM (#50697223) Journal

            You don't see it happening because very few people know about it. Do you think that the lack of media coverage is accidental? Oh I know, Ben Carson the Republican candidate said something loony about having to attack a gunman on a spree just to kill, so that has to take all 7 "News" stations days to investigate and discuss. TPPIP? Not a word could be heard on any of those stations about that one. Amazingly, the candidates are not discussing it or being quoted on that one either.

            First, Carson's comment is about as loony as calling the police and expecting them to save you. What he said was if you are about to die, try to save others. It's no different than after 9/11 when public discussion went from advising people to stay calm and follow orders/cooperate when an airplane is hijacked to assume you will be dead so take risks and save others. If you cannot understand that, you might have a serious problem.

            Next, there is no or little media coverage because until recently there was nothing to cover outside of speculation. It's all been drafts leaked to the public via questionable sources and as we found out, a lot is different. I suspect we will end up continuing with little coverage because the IP provisions benefit the news corporations greatly.

            Oh but Donal Trump this and that, and of course everyone is just mean to Hillary because in all the time she served as Secretary of State she never ever sent or received even 1 classified email.

            That is an outright lie.
            http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09... [nytimes.com]

            http://www.washingtontimes.com... [washingtontimes.com]

            The game is rigged pretty heavily today. People would probably shit themselves if they really know how much they are being manipulated. But hell, Facebook does not show anything too important in their feeds, and Facebook taking over control of that was accidental too.

            Yup and you demonstrated my point with your political half assery too. Whenever someone talks about this subject, they have half the facts and half the fallacy along with all the hyperbole.

            That rant is not really directed at you. It is directed at those who are now wearing that same tin-foil hat they accused others of wearing. I hope it fits them well.

            This happens more often than most of us are willing to realize. Early warnings of lost jobs came about with NAFTA, Crazies like Glenn Beck was warning of ISIS and the Caliphate long before it was mainstream. Hell, even the horrors of Nazi Germany were foretold before the world was shocked at what we found at the end of WWII. Escaped Jews were trying to get the US involved long before Pearl Harbor pushed us over the edge. I guess for some, they just have to reach out and touch the hot stove in order to understand what your warning about the stove being hot really means.

            • by s.petry ( 762400 )

              First, Carson's comment is about as loony as calling the police and expecting them to save you.

              No need to defend Carson to me, I fully understand context and how it's being ignored for the "story". Read those comments again as snark.

              Next, there is no or little media coverage because until recently there was nothing to cover outside of speculation. It's all been drafts leaked to the public via questionable sources and as we found out, a lot is different. I suspect we will end up continuing with little coverage because the IP provisions benefit the news corporations greatly.

              You may be arguing with me (hard to tell), but are demonstrating the point I made. I have seen more information and investigation by Wikileaks, RT, and the Guardian than any of the 7 top "news" stations in the US. Just the rumors should have been enough to put real journalists in action. And no, it's not about ratings because imagine the ratings one station would be

              • by fnj ( 64210 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @09:14AM (#50698561)

                I don't believe you understand cynicism and sarcasm.

                No offense, but maybe if you get pounded on the head enough you will understand that cynicism and sarcasm is very, very hard to pull off effectively in person with tonal and visual cues, and all but impossible on the printed page. My most friendly advice is to avoid trying it. It doesn't work.

          • by ArylAkamov ( 4036877 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @01:07AM (#50697591)

            Hah, don't worry, the sarcasm was plain as day.

            It is directed at those who are now wearing that same tin-foil hat they accused others of wearing. I hope it fits them well.

            This is what really gets to me. If you try to mention any of this to the average person, they will scream tinfoil hat all day long. Even if you show them undeniable proof of some wrongdoing, the same person will act like they knew it all along and you're an idiot for thinking it to be news.

            Great example was Snowden.

            Me: Don't say anything stupid or incriminate yourself online, everything is recorded by the NSA
            Mr. X: Stop being so paranoid, there's no way they could possibly do that. Take off your tinfoil hat.

            Me: See? I told you they've been doing this without our knowledge
            Mr. X: Of course they have, what's so surprising about it? Stop acting like this is anything new, anyone with a brain already knew this

            There is no winning with them.

      • by symbolic ( 11752 )

        > or vote them out of office

        Indeed - I think it will be an interesting time when we see a) how many of our elected representatives vote in favor of this junk, and b) how many of them are still in office after the next election.

      • by HiThere ( 15173 )

        I have complained to my representative. If you haven't, please do so now.

        OTOH, don't expect it to make any difference. I expect my representative to vote in the way I would approve of, but I expect that would have happened even without my comment. I don't expect either of my senators to be as virtuous. Only one of them to I give any chance. The other would be willing to lie about the position taken to get my support (I've caught that happening before), but wouldn't actually change position.

        So what gove

      • by 0123456 ( 636235 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @11:37PM (#50697397)

        or vote them out of office

        Uh, no.

        You can't 'vote them out of office'. You can only vote to replace them with another asshole who's just as corrupt.

        If we could 'vote them out of office', this problem would have gone away long ago, as most political offices would be empty.

    • by trout007 ( 975317 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:02PM (#50696917)

      This is why Jury Nullification is so important. Of course that's why many of these laws will be enforced without a trial.

    • I consider it well inside my rights to ignore your laws.

      That's a great theory, until your home is raided by FBI and IRS agents, whose guns are harder to ignore.

  • vote it down (Score:5, Interesting)

    by bzipitidoo ( 647217 ) <bzipitidoo@yahoo.com> on Friday October 09, 2015 @08:39PM (#50696793) Journal

    This treaty is an outright declaration of class warfare, with lots of surveillance goodies thrown in to get the enforcement part of government on board.

    The thing to do now in the US is simply vote it down. If it is fast tracked so that Congress can only vote yes or no, then "no" it is. Just in case there's a chance of passage, we should make a lot of noise, make sure our representatives know our will and that it won't be safe to ignore us.

  • choose your methods of fighting !

    The Committee For Public Safety will now come to order !

    resistance will not be futile, but mandatory.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    What got passed is what the deep pockets paid for. It's called extortion.
  • Double-edged sword? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Krishnoid ( 984597 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:24PM (#50697013) Journal

    Since this weakens the public domain and strengthens rights for rightsholders, does it comparably strengthen the case for copyleft? How/would this change FOSS promotion and/or adoption strategies?

  • by Kevin Fishburne ( 1296859 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @09:46PM (#50697073) Homepage
    I can and will circumvent any technological or legal obstacles they can dream of, and they can all go fuck themselves. At some point they're going to run out of dimwits who don't know how to use encryption, VPN, tor, i2p, freenet, bittorrent, etc., and their entire consumer base will have collapsed with a mighty "ARRR!!!" How's that for an end game, you short-sighted, unimaginative, greedy bitches?
  • TPP Packs (Score:5, Interesting)

    by CanEHdian ( 1098955 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @10:14PM (#50697151)

    I strongly suggest that, in countries that will see their public domains turned back 20 years, electronic distributors of public domain works create a special "TPP Pack" -- a collection of works that are currently in the public domain, but will revert back to copyrighted status. This will give everyone enough time to download these packs before the TPP is ratified.

    And I'm not getting any financial compensation for the fact that works I purchased, with the understanding that they would become public domain within the next two decades, will now not become so, and I'm sure that are those who are seniors and perhaps will never see those works enter the public domain during their remaining lifetime. Speaking of which, once those Generation Typewriter are removed from the voting constituents, perhaps Digital Issues will become more important and we will finally see copyright term reductions. Of course, retroactively, and without compensation as well.

    PS why wasn't this included in the Canadian Government's "TPP summary"?

  • by Beeftopia ( 1846720 ) on Friday October 09, 2015 @10:42PM (#50697233)

    The Economist is a very pro-business magazine. Here's what they said about patents and the TPP:

    "The cost of the innovation that never takes place because of the flawed patent system is incalculable. Patent protection is spreading, through deals such as the planned Trans-Pacific Partnership, which promises to cover one-third of world trade. The aim should be to fix the system, not make it more pervasive."

    -- The Economist, "Time to fix patents", 8 August 2015 [economist.com]

    • by 0123456 ( 636235 )

      The only people surprised by this are the useful idiots who actually believe--get this--that patents encourage innovation.

      I mean, I know it's hard to believe anyone would fall for that crap, but some really do. We even get some posting around here now and again.

      • Patents can actually serve their purpose. Most of the pharmaceutical industry is built around patents - companies spend vast amounts of money on research to get them. They are evil greedy mega-corps, of course, but that doesn't matter: Their drugs still keep people alive regardless of the motivation for their creation.

        Part of the reason patents do more good than harm is their duration - it's long enough to be beneficial, but not so long that the costs outweigh the benefits. Copyright, on the other hand, has

        • by delt0r ( 999393 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @08:07AM (#50698373)
          Having worked for big pharma, that is more than enough proof that patents should be abolished. Oh but it cost so much to get a drug to market you say. They don't pay for that, government grants and university "collaborations" do. But who will make our drugs? Well for a start we may actually get drugs that are useful and help, and will even be given only to patients that need them. Secondly we will get rid of the "Shut up and take our fucking pills" pharma medicine. It is like homeopathy. Only with real side effects.

          http://dilbert.com/strip/2009-... [dilbert.com]

          Burning all the big pharma to the ground would increase the health of the general public.
        • by fnj ( 64210 )

          Patents can actually serve their purpose. Most of the pharmaceutical industry is built around patents - companies spend vast amounts of money on research to get them. They are evil greedy mega-corps, of course, but that doesn't matter: Their drugs still keep people alive regardless of the motivation for their creation.

          But at what cost? To the unfortunate individual, and to society?

          I won't buy that, forgive me, pablum. The capitalist system with patents does indeed get the development money spent - but then

  • Millions spent by 487 organizations to influence TPP outcome [opensecrets.org]

    Kneel before the god of free trade.

    I look forward to discovering the unexpected surprises in this thing.

  • by bug1 ( 96678 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @01:19AM (#50697613)

    Copyleft uses the power of copyright to subvert its common intent.

    By giving copyright holders more powers, maybe we can now do more savage things to corporate violators, like send them jail.

    Perhaps we need an anti-TPP software licence to take advange of this new power.

    The harder they squeeze....

    • by sconeu ( 64226 )

      Aren't they cute when they're naive?

      Laws are to be used by the $BIGCORPS against ordinary people, not the other way around.

  • by SuricouRaven ( 1897204 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @03:49AM (#50697899)

    https://birds-are-nice.me/musi... [birds-are-nice.me]

    I show how the concept of the public domain has been crushed by demonstrating just how little popular music exists in it.

    I'd call this shameless self-promotion, but I make about £0.03 a month in advertising off that. Factor in that everyone uses ad-blocking here and I might make £0.06 this month if it gets slashdotted. No, I just want to flood the internet with public-domain music in open-standard format.

  • by Spinalcold ( 955025 ) on Saturday October 10, 2015 @04:35AM (#50697987)
    And Japan. It's not just IP to worry about, it's a whole host of things. Under NAFTA Canada became the most sued country [huffingtonpost.ca] and most of those were to remove our environmental protections. At least we're in an election right now and if we can get the Conservatives out we have at least a HOPE of at least renegotiating it. Then again, a guy I work with just voted (advanced voting) and somehow accidentally checked the wrong box...sometimes I want to give up...

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