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Government United States Politics

Speaker of the House Boehner Announces Resignation 406

halfEvilTech writes: House Speaker John A. Boehner announced Friday morning that he will resign at the end of October. The Washington Post reports: "The resignation will end a nearly five-year reign as speaker, allowing House Republicans to approve a short-term government funding bill that will avert a shutdown of federal agencies. Boehner's hold on the speaker's gavel had grown increasingly unsteady amid threats from more than 30 Republicans that they would force a no-confidence vote in his speaker's position, which would have forced him to rely on Democratic votes in order to remain in charge. Several GOP members told The Washington Post that Boehner would step down from Congress Oct. 31."
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Speaker of the House Boehner Announces Resignation

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  • He might have been Republican in name but seemed to vote more like a democrat.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:18PM (#50597863)

      He might have been Republican in name but seemed to vote more like a democrat.

      If you're not with us you're against us, eh? If you look at a graph [govtrack.us], he's moderate. "More like a Democrat"? You can be moderate, you know. For a site that rails against the two party system, the comments seem to want to reinforce it.

      • by mrchaotica ( 681592 ) * on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:23PM (#50597947)

        Don't you know? If you're a moderate, then you are like a Democrat. The Republican party is far-right extremist, and "the left" no longer exists. Even "socialist" Bernie Sanders is only about as far left as Eisenhower.

        • I'm slightly intrigued by the proximity of this announcement to the Papal visit. I know Boehner's said he wanted to quit last time, but only stayed on because Cantor got the boot. And the hardliners in his own party have been circling like wolves to unseat him as Speaker. But is there a chance that he was wavering on this decision, and something about the Pope's visit prompted him to get off the fence?

          • by creimer ( 824291 )
            He's probably leaving on his own terms to get a nice lobbyist job on K Street, as the papal visit makes for a good cover story. If he waited until he got dragged through the mud in a leadership fight, his compensation from K Street would be substantially lower.
            • I understand all that, my question is why announce it now? Is he trying to "bury the story" under the Papal news cycle? (Fat chance!) I suspect he'll pitch it more as a "come to Jesus" moment, inspired by the Pope. Not that it matters much, he's leaving in any case. I'm just curious to see how it plays out.

              • Is he trying to "bury the story" under the Papal news cycle?

                wait, papal split from ebay a month or two ago, didn't they?

                why is this news, now? did something happen?

          • According to the news reports the Pope did whisper something to him. No one knows what was said except for the pope and Boehner.

      • That graph does show him to the left of literally every other Republican, though, however they measure "ideology". I didn't read through the methodology.

      • For a site that rails against the two party system, the comments seem to want to reinforce it.

        This site rails against the two party system only in that they find the other party (ie, the democrats) to be an inconvenience that they need to rid the nation of. Around here if you stand to the left of Genghis Khan you're a goddamned socialist.

        This is of course particularly funny when you see slashdotters twist themselves into knots trying to align themselves with Reagan (who is far too far to the left to be welcomed in today's GOP) while still pushing their extreme conservative agenda.

      • by HiThere ( 15173 ) <(charleshixsn) (at) (earthlink.net)> on Friday September 25, 2015 @03:12PM (#50599863)

        Being a moderate would require being to the left of most elected Democrats. If you'd said he was a mean politician, however, it would be hard to argue.

        (Possibly median, but it seems to me to be closer to the mean. And by politician I'm only considering elected legislators in the Federal Government.)

    • by creimer ( 824291 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:20PM (#50597885) Homepage
      You mean like President Ronald Reagan who raised taxes 11 times, cooperated with Tip O'Neil and the Democrats to get things done, negotiated with the Soviets and the Iranians, and granted amnesty to illegal immigrants?
      • by caladine ( 1290184 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:31PM (#50598043)
        Too many repubs conveniently gloss over the facts with their vaunted Reagan. Someone with his record would be considered the worst kind of RINO by the repub base today. If could, I'd be +1'ing this.
      • by tomhath ( 637240 )

        cooperated with Tip O'Neil and the Democrats to get things done

        That's the important part. Neither party can get anything done unless they sit down and and cut deals. Obama, Pelosi and Reed proved that.

    • He might have been Republican in name but seemed to vote more like a democrat.

      Hardly. He did tend to vote moderate though, which extremists tend to find uncomfortable.

    • It is a good day.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by romanval ( 556418 )

      Exactly how does a "real" Republican vote in a way that's in the best interests for all?

      Real politics is one of compromise... and I haven't seen a TPR (Tea Party Republican) do that in a long time.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Yeah, or he was trying to do that thing called 'governing.'

      After the elections are over, the Congress needs to actually work together and compromise in order to enact legislation to keep government working. You can't just stamp your feet and demand you always get your way - that's not governing, and results in the completely dysfunctional shitty government we have today.

      Oh, I know what you're thinking: "I'd rather have a gridlocked government than one that passes this socialist marxist yadda blah blah" - k

  • Therapeutic (Score:3, Funny)

    by DigiShaman ( 671371 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:09PM (#50597755) Homepage

    Finally, he can devote more time to those A.A. meetings. It's both good for him and America.

  • So which corporation will now fork over the board positions and stock bonuses that they've been promising? It's called cashing in. Politicians are doing it younger these days so that they have more time to enjoy their ill gotten wealth.

  • I'm afraid (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rlwhite ( 219604 ) <rogerwh AT gmail DOT com> on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:18PM (#50597867)

    that this will leave the insane tea partiers in charge of the asylum that is the House of Representatives. It's like the last adult is leaving the room.

  • by schwit1 ( 797399 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:22PM (#50597929)
    Reid has already announced his departure. Too many career politicians. We need new blood.
  • I look forward to our new, even less reasonable speaker.
  • by dywolf ( 2673597 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:31PM (#50598045)

    Boehner is a devout Catholic.
    Boehner invited the Pope to speak before Congress.
    During the Pope's address to the Congress, an address that specifically rebuked many Republican stances* Boehner has supported, Boehner was visibly crying.
    The day after the Pope's address, Boehner announces his resignation.

    We should wait and see what he actually does next following his resignation, but a part of me can't help but hope that he saw the light finally, that he saw the discrepancies between the faith he claimed, and the party he was part of for so long. One can hope.

    (*yes I know he chastised both sides)

    • by cdrudge ( 68377 )

      My money is on he finally got a clue of the upcoming train wreck that will be the GOP and decided he didn't want to be one of the engineers driving the engine.

    • by tnk1 ( 899206 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @01:02PM (#50598407)

      Possibly, but Boehner tends to cry at the drop of a hat.

      Certainly, there may have been a causal link between the pope's message and the timing of his resignation, but I'm guessing that its mostly cover so that he can resign with dignity before the imminent infighting in the Republican caucus caused him to get fired.

      He did suggest that he was planning on resigning until Eric Cantor got beaten. I can believe that because Cantor's loss was a big upset and it was likely that Cantor would have been an immediate front runner for the Speaker job. Boehner could certainly have decided to ride it out after that in the interests of continuity. I'm just not sure that it ended up helping, but it may have given him some more time to get someone else lined up who isn't a Tea Partier.

    • Boehner to Pope: "Holy Father, I can't take this anymore."
      Pope to Boehner: "Life is short, my son. Dump these idiots and learn to drive a truck."

    • by quonsar ( 61695 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @02:13PM (#50599311) Homepage

      Boehner is a devout Catholic. Boehner invited the Pope to speak before Congress. During the Pope's address to the Congress, an address that specifically rebuked many Republican stances* Boehner has supported, Boehner was visibly crying.

      Boehner has invited THREE Popes to speak before Congress. It is something he has hoped to facilitate for many years. He finally succeeded, and I suspect that was a greater source of his emotion than any sort of crisis of conscience you may imagine.

    • by T.E.D. ( 34228 )
      I was going to disagree with you here. However, I just heard Boehner's statement. He said he made the decision last night, and he specifically mentioned the Pope's exhortation to compromise and work together (which to my mind was the most damning thing the Pope said to Congress yesterday). Also, there's this report [cnn.com] from when he announced it privately to his conference:

      Boehner also told the lawmakers that Pope Francis' visit to Congress the day before was a crystallizing moment, according to the lawmaker. Boehner then read the prayer of St. Francis to the conference after announcing his decision.

      So yes, it looks like you were actually right on the money. It was going to happen eventually, but as to why today? The Pope did this.

  • Good Riddance (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Streetlight ( 1102081 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:34PM (#50598089) Journal
    Oh, wait. His replacement might be worse and the House of Representatives may get even less done. Now, it'll be interesting whether Boehner has lined up a job with an existing lobbying company or will form his own company. He'll likely make many millions, if not tens of millions, of dollars per year no matter what he does.
    • His replacement might be worse and the House of Representatives may get even less done.

      Is that actually possible? Seems like the only thing they do is have repeated pointless votes to repeal the Affordable Care Act and de-fund Planned Parenthood along with periodically trying (and even succeeding once) to shut down the federal government over the spending cap.

      • by cdrudge ( 68377 )

        If they do shut down the government, does that count as doing something? Or even more not doing something? It's so confusing.

  • by jd.schmidt ( 919212 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:50PM (#50598283)
    I probably wouldn't agree with Boehner 100% on a lot of issues, but is was pretty clear he didn't believe lots of the nonsense that came out of the far right wing of his party. I think it became too much for him to deal with.
  • by sootman ( 158191 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:53PM (#50598327) Homepage Journal

    "... amid threats from more than 30 Republicans that they would force a no-confidence vote in his speaker's position..."

    Wow! I never knew politics could be as exciting as a Star Wars movie!

    I mean, yeah, the most boring part of the most boring one, but still...

  • by Kennon ( 683628 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @12:59PM (#50598385) Homepage
    I would cheer but you know there's just another warmonger in an expensive suit standing behind him to take his place.
  • by ThatsNotPudding ( 1045640 ) on Friday September 25, 2015 @01:09PM (#50598481)
    He learned just a one cannot herd cats, one cannot reason with the outright psychotics that the Teabagging Koch Brothers, et al loosed on the Republican party (and the entire country).
  • "The resignation will end a nearly five-year reign as speaker"

    Translation: "The resignation will end a nearly five-year reign as a lame, inept, orange-colored buffoon who couldn't get his own fucking party to back his loopy ideas."

    His "leading by resigning" strategy follows that of Sarah Palin and Scott Walker.

  • He wasn't as bad as Pelosi, but he came pretty close.

    This is the best thing he's ever done for this country, and he could do us an even bigger favor by resigning his congressional seat as well.

    -jcr

  • Goodbye House, Welcome Solarium!

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