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Canada Microsoft Politics

Canada Waives Own Rules, Helps Microsoft Avoid US Visa Problems 122

Freshly Exhumed writes Citizenship and Immigration Canada has granted an unprecedented exemption to Microsoft that will allow the company to bring in an unspecified number of temporary foreign workers as trainees without first looking for Canadians to fill the jobs. No other company in any other field has been granted such an exemption, and it does not fall within any of the other categories where exemptions are normally given, according to a source familiar with process, effectively creating a new category: the Microsoft Exemption. Microsoft Canada did not immediately respond to questions about the deal, but in an interview earlier this year with Bloomberg Businessweek, Karen Jones, Microsoft's deputy general counsel, said the deal will allow Microsoft to bypass stricter U.S. rules on visas for foreign workers. The entire issue of temporary foreign workers has been as blisteringly hot a topic across Canada as it has been in the USA.
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Canada Waives Own Rules, Helps Microsoft Avoid US Visa Problems

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  • by iCEBaLM ( 34905 ) <icebalm&icebalm,com> on Saturday December 13, 2014 @04:18PM (#48590597)

    We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country, we have a surplus, and with some provinces having over 10% unemployment rates Harper is seemingly doing everything he can to keep Canadians out of Canadian jobs.

    Fucking neocons.

    • do American workers now displaced from places overseas get waved across the border to work in Canada, then, eh?

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 13, 2014 @05:46PM (#48591019)

        It sounds more like a way to get more overseas workers into the US.

        "The source said that means the company will take advantage of rules governing intra-company transfers, which require employees to work for at least one year at a company subsidiary before being transferred to the U.S."

        Sounds like they'll import cheap labor to Canada. Have them work there for a year and then import them into the US.

        • Exactly. The two talking heads on the TV news both said it was about getting more foreign workers into the US.

        • by Cyberax ( 705495 )
          Unlikely. L1 transfers can work just as well for companies in Europe or Asia. A couple of my friends immigrated in the US by creating a company in the US and a local subsidiary in Ukraine, then they simply transferred to the US after 1 year (and it's totally legal). So why Microsoft would need to move workers to Canada first if any other country is sufficient?

          More likely Microsoft said something like: "Either we cut 1000 positions in Canada or you allow us to bring temps. Your choice."
    • by davecb ( 6526 ) <davec-b@rogers.com> on Saturday December 13, 2014 @04:28PM (#48590667) Homepage Journal
      I fear the neo-cons want us back in the day of William the Conqueror, where there were Normans and the peasants they owned.
      • by fahrbot-bot ( 874524 ) on Saturday December 13, 2014 @07:30PM (#48591423)

        And the rich get richer and the poor get poorer [nytimes.com] -- America where the Walton family (majority shareholders in Walmart) has wealth equal to the wealth of the bottom 42% of Americans combined. [politifact.com]

        • by sycodon ( 149926 ) on Saturday December 13, 2014 @09:41PM (#48591863)

          When people get their panties in a twist about how much "wealth" the Walton family has it just shows they don't understand what wealth is.

          Their "wealth" is paper. They could be worth X millions one day and X - a butt load of money the next. It has no impact on how much they can spend at lunch or whether they get the premium cable package or the standard. It's not cash. They'd have to sell or take out loans against their shares if they wanted to go buy a Private Jet or something like that.

          So the fact they are worth a few billion in paper doesn't diminish your pay check at all.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            But they have more money than us and clearly we work harder because our jobs are dirty manual labor or services that will be replaced by robots within the next 50 years. How will support ourselves when we have nothing of use to offer to the world?

          • by NoKaOi ( 1415755 )

            It has no impact on how much they can spend at lunch or whether they get the premium cable package or the standard.

            Right, I'm sure they have to budget their lunches very carefully. I'm sure they have to make decisions about which days they have to bring lunch from home and how many days they can afford to eat out. I'm sure it's also a huge decision about whether to splurge for the premium cable package, or save money and get standard cable so they can afford a few more days of eating off the dollar menu.

            They'd have to sell or take out loans against their shares if they wanted to go buy a Private Jet or something like that.

            Oh. My. God. You mean they can't just order another private jet online, they actually have to fill out some paper

            • No, they couldn't find the entire wealth of their employees in their couch cushions. It is impossible to find a negative amount of money. Their employees total wealth is a very large debt which most of them will never be able to pay off.
              • No, they couldn't find the entire wealth of their employees in their couch cushions. It is impossible to find a negative amount of money. Their employees total wealth is a very large debt which most of them will never be able to pay off.

                What's even more irritating is that the richest and largest company in the world staffs itself through subsidies that come out of your pocket and mine. Most of the people working there are barely scraping by, and when the hours get cut after Christmas, they go file for welfare and unemployment benefits to supplement their meager income. People can afford to work there because we make up for their pathetic salary through taxes. This seriously pisses me off.

                • Yea, no joke. Our system is fucked, and it is only going to get worse before we have no choice but to destroy the system.
          • Walmart pays a healthy dividend. If one owned, say, $10B worth of the stock, they'd have to scrape by on a mere $229M per year in cash. That's not even a million dollars a day! What's a person to do?
          • Well, it does actually impact things like what they pay for lunch, since, oddly, the more money a person has "on paper," the less they're expected to actually pay for.

          • When people get their panties in a twist about how much "wealth" the Walton family has it just shows they don't understand what wealth is.

            Their "wealth" is paper. They could be worth X millions one day and X - a butt load of money the next. It has no impact on how much they can spend at lunch or whether they get the premium cable package or the standard. It's not cash.

            On the contrary, it is very definitely cash. Walmart Corporation pays dividends [walmart.com] to the tune of $0.48 per share every quarter for the past four quarters. Walmart has raised their dividend every year for the past 41 years. That amounts to $3.1 billion in cash paid to the Waltons this year. The Walton family still controls a simple majority of the company, owning more than 50% of the 3.223 billion shares outstanding.

            That's cash money. No loan, no promissory note, no sale of shares. Of course the Waltons

          • Unlike Capitalism, Globalization is Zero-sum and a giant Ponzi/Pyramid scheme.
            http://www.businessinsider.com... [businessinsider.com]
          • When people get their panties in a twist about how much "wealth" the Walton family has it just shows they don't understand what wealth is.

            Their "wealth" is paper. They could be worth X millions one day and X - a butt load of money the next. It has no impact on how much they can spend at lunch or whether they get the premium cable package or the standard. It's not cash. They'd have to sell or take out loans against their shares if they wanted to go buy a Private Jet or something like that.

            So the fact they are worth a few billion in paper doesn't diminish your pay check at all.

            Cash is also 'paper' and wealth doesn't need to be cash anyway.

            That being said, they probably also have more cash on hand than the lower half of Americans combined as well.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism
          http://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/aug/29/ha-joon-chang-23-things

          Ferdinand Pecora
          http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-man-who-busted-the-banksters-932416/

          The Hellhound of Wallstreet (Ferdinand Pecora)
          https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.amazon.com/The-Hellhound-Wall-Street-Investigation/dp/B004LQ0EDM&sa=U&ei=gPuMVP2KGcSyogSY1YCACA&ved=0CAsQFjAA&usg=AFQjCNEiPCKQVF56wqnQzu8Lnm4D8XkctA

          Labor is labor. Capital seeks the lowest cost. Borders

        • That's because the bottom 42% doesn't save. If you don't save, you have no wealth by definition.
          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by Anonymous Coward

            That's because the bottom 42% doesn't save. If you don't save, you have no wealth by definition.

            I know this may come as a shock to you, but it's very likely the bottom 42% can't save in order to build wealth.

            And quite often it comes down to simple math and nothing else.

          • To be fair, a great many of that 42% have little opportunity to save based on the value of the work they're doing. When you're making $18k a year, even if you have no kids, it's nearly impossible to save anything. Now I know what you're going to say - get a better job - but ultimately, someone has to clean the toilets at your office building and that someone isn't going to make more than $18k because that work just isn't that valuable. Increasing everyone's pay is also not a solution as that merely increas

            • It's always boggled my mind how a person can say that toilet-scrubbers don't deserve decent pay because they aren't necessarily 'valuable,' in the very next breath after saying "someone HAS to scrub the toilets."

              I know that's not what you were getting at, just making an observation.

              • by jd2112 ( 1535857 )

                It's always boggled my mind how a person can say that toilet-scrubbers don't deserve decent pay because they aren't necessarily 'valuable,' in the very next breath after saying "someone HAS to scrub the toilets."

                I know that's not what you were getting at, just making an observation.

                We can build a spaceship and load it up with all of the telephone sanitizes and marketing consultants and such then ship them off to another planet. What could possibly go wrong?

              • by pnutjam ( 523990 )
                I was pondering this very topic during my morning shower. How easy it is for someone to say, skip lunch, don't get cable, live on beans and rice, walk to work, etc...

                It's simple to make a temporary sacrifice, when you can see the light at the end of the tunnel and your probably coming off a pretty nice existence.
                It's not so simple to make a sacrifice that leave's you treading water, in the same miserable existence. Human nature makes it seem better to enjoy yourself while you can.
            • Now I know what you're going to say

              No you don't. But in passing we can mention that even janitors make more than $18k.

              When you're making $18k a year, even if you have no kids, it's nearly impossible to save anything.

              No it's not, you have horrible personal finances.

              • But in passing we can mention that even janitors make more than $18k.

                Depends on where you live.

                When you're making $18k a year, even if you have no kids, it's nearly impossible to save anything.

                No it's not, you have horrible personal finances.

                Depends on where you live.

            • > someone isn't going to make more than $18k because that work just isn't that valuable

              In some places, the minimum wage is US$15.00 per hour.
              For a full time job, that means an annual income of US$30,000.

              >Perhaps part of every welfare program should include some money and financial management counseling.

              If your gross monthly income is US$1,500:
              * Tax: US$180;
              * FICA: US$180;
              For a take home check of US$1,140:
              * Prudence dictates that one spend no more than 25% of one's gross income on shelter, including ut

              • by ixidor ( 996844 )
                yes, exactly. in places where the min wages is over the federal, it is almost always because the cost of living is so much. like DC, or San Fransisco. try to find somewhere to stay in DC for less than $900/month, i dare you. or how about this... im hourly, $18/hr, about 36-38 hours per week. now take out taxes (i usually figure it at about 25% for all of it), child support $440/mo, and the company health plan im forced to get ( due to custody and paperwork from the state) at $220/mo, im left with what some
      • by John G ( 3509575 )
        We never really left the feodal system. It been relabled, and reshaped more than once, and over the centuries the aristocracy gave us a bone or two to keep the general population from going all revolutionary again. We just taded land baron for rail baron. From rail baron to heavy industry baron it was only the logical step that we moved on to financial and high technology baron. Sure education will open you some doors now. At least it use to but look how they are working on stacking the lowest steps in the
    • by lgw ( 121541 )

      We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country

      What's a "CS worker"? Is that like help desk? IT support is not a career with much of a future, unless you're a packethead or have some other backend specialty.

      But if you meant "software developer", skilled devs are deeply in demand in the US in Silly Valley, and closer in Seattle - come on down, the weather's nice^W sucks less. Heck, I know my company's been hiring aggressively in Canada as well.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        You need to define what "skilled" means to you because there seems to be a mismatch between what skilled means to people looking for work and what skilled means to people looking for workers, ahem, by workers I mean passionate people looking for opportunities they're passionate about, such as web button design.

        • by lgw ( 121541 )

          You need to define what "skilled" means

          Well, what really matters is able to perform well in the job interview. But in theory that's coding skill, design skills, and leadership skills. And not locking up due to nerves during the interview, but it's an imperfect world. With the growth of cloud, it back-end and infrastructure specialties that seem most in demand (as long as you think at scale).

          there seems to be a mismatch between what skilled means to people looking for work and what skilled means to people looking for workers, ahem, by workers I mean passionate people looking for opportunities they're passionate about, such as web button design.

          Indeed, you hit the nail right on the ... button.

        • by mikael ( 484 )

          From the job descriptions available now, a software developer, software engineer or senior software engineer will consult with clients and other engineers, write design specifications, write, design and implement unit tests using Microsoft or Google Test frameworks, do task breakdowns, provide accurate time estimates, implement software modules, provide code reviews, keep bug lists up to date, mentor software engineers through techniques such as pair or extreme programming, participate in Agile and Scrum me

      • "CS worker" = people with a degree in computer science. I feel it's pretty self-explanatory, since when are computer science grads working in IT support?

        By the way, American companies tend to hire quite a bit in Canada and plenty of people go, but eh, there's an implicit (and now explicit) tension in American society (racism, class-ism, not to mention gun violence, lack of healthcare, etc.) that tend not to sit well with some Canadians.
        • by lgw ( 121541 )

          "CS worker" = people with a degree in computer science

          Not a single person I was friends with in college went on to work in the same field as their major - well, I guess there was one guy who got a CS degree and went on to code, but in a very different role than the specialty he got a masters in.

          When people use these ambiguous phrases like "IT" or "CS worker", I always wonder: why the euphemism? If you mean software developer, say software developer. It's the best job you can get (as far as working for other people without being a star entertainer) in many na

    • by BarbaraHudson ( 3785311 ) <barbarahudson@gm a i l.com> on Saturday December 13, 2014 @04:33PM (#48590699) Journal

      It's not just a surplus in CS - in some areas it's a HUGE surplus. This is just a continuation of the exemptions granted to the banks to bring in foreign workers and have the current workers train them to do their jobs and then get laid off, ditto fast-food chains who don't want to hire Canadians who know their rights and as such are "too uppity", etc.

      FTFA:

      Karen Jones, Microsoft’s deputy general counsel, said the deal will allow Microsoft to bypass stricter U.S. rules on visas for foreign workers.

      "The U.S. laws clearly did not meet our needs. We have to look to other places," she told the wire service. She went on to say Microsoft didn’t choose to expand in Vancouver "purely for immigration purposes, but immigration is a factor."

      The source said that means the company will take advantage of rules governing intra-company transfers, which require employees to work for at least one year at a company subsidiary before being transferred to the U.S. He says the result will be a net disadvantage for Canada.

      Bad enough the Burger King - Tim Hortons deal was a blatant tax dodge at a time when governments everywhere are trying to get corporations to behave more responsibly ... I guess the Harper government decided to "double-double down."

      Blame Canada.
      Shame, Canada.
      Oh, Canada.
      Oh-oh Canada.

      • interesting - I've been saying the same about americans in the US - they are 'too uppity' and know their rights, so therefore, they can't be bullied as much as indi^H^H^H^Hforeign workers holding h1b's.

        that's yet another elephant in the room; its not so much about huge difference in wages (in the US, the h1b's get pretty close to what the USians make; not 50% and not 30%, but close to 80 or 90%) but its more about 'getting more hours out of them' with less complaining. fear of being shipped back home is en

    • by WarJolt ( 990309 )

      We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country, we have a surplus

      CS workers is an ambiguous term, since a lot of CS jobs require vastly different skills. Even if your statement is based on real data, I don't think it's telling the whole story. Employment statistics are incredibly easy to spin. Not every CS worker has the skills necessary to work for Microsoft.

      Not being a Canadian myself I don't have any first hand experience. The ictc article from 2013 seems to contradict your statement.
      http://www.ictc-ctic.ca/?p=184... [ictc-ctic.ca]

      • by BarbaraHudson ( 3785311 ) <barbarahudson@gm a i l.com> on Saturday December 13, 2014 @05:15PM (#48590885) Journal
        The article is bogus. If you'll note, the article was written to attack a study by the TD Bank that debunked the whole "skilled shortage" myth. It was written by an employer lobby group, without citing a single statistic to back it up. As has been pointed out many times since, there is no skills shortage - just a shortage of people willing to work for far less than they used to under the threat of "we'll replace you with someone off-shore/with a visa/whatever".
      • by ILongForDarkness ( 1134931 ) on Saturday December 13, 2014 @05:38PM (#48590985)

        Agreed. People quickly specialize just like any profession. I think I'm pretty comfortable learning new stuff but my experience and expertise lies with C# and tsql development. So for example going with a recent posting I've looked at: when Google posts a job wanting a javascript and Python coder with 5 years experience with each I'm not that guy. I might be able to talk myself into a shot but it isn't exactly like the recruiter is going to be jumping up and down saying "obviously that guy will figure it out quickly". I need a great resume, have good real world (if not directly related) experience, and solid references to get an interview. Then I need to sell myself like hell to convince the hiring manager to give me a chance. Similar with MS: a lot of people don't have C/C++ experience any more. Some areas of the company that might be fine, others it won't be it all depends on what they want you for.

        Most commenters seemed to be missing the point of the linked article though: these are for trainee positions. MS might be using it as a way to weasle around HB-1 requirements (people getting foreign subsidary experience to get around limits) but it might be that it is a training centre to ultimately send people back to their home countries. It could be hard to scatter around say Office development and have the true experts with the code base mentor junior devs in each of the countries MS operates in. Easier to have them nearby Redmond for a couple years then push them out already relatively up to speed back to India, Ireland, wherever.

        It really depends what MS's intent is with the workers that are "trainees". If they are meant to go back "home" then they probably weren't jobs Canadians were qualified for anyways: language/culture reasons, presumably their home countries have similar hire local first rules, or are otherwise unappealing to most Canadians: earning $10,000 a year in India for example. Similar to H1-B rules if I understand them correctly (I'm Canadian not American) for those workers that MS is allowed to bring in they should mandate that they get comparable wages compared to Canadian workers so as not to drop the market price for "IT" workers in Vancouver down to Indian wage levels. Vancouver is one of the most expensive cities in the world, I moved away from there because of it: earning a programmers salary there is about equivalent to being a college student elsewhere in the country: ie one bedroom apartment and enough money left over at the end of the week to order a pizza. Not my thing, but I guess people make equivalent choices when they live in San Fran or whatever.

        • by wiredlogic ( 135348 ) on Saturday December 13, 2014 @06:42PM (#48591245)

          MS might be using it as a way to weasle around HB-1 requirements (people getting foreign subsidary experience to get around limits)

          That's exactly what it is. There's no point in sugar coating it with the presumption of that they're trying to help out the little guy. This is all part of the orchestrated plan by the elites to create an oversupply of labor with foreign workers and drive wages down. Their proximity to Vancouver makes this a slam dunk for Microsoft. Why sink money into lobbying for more H1Bs when L1Bs are unlimited and NAFTA greases the bureaucratic wheels.

        • It's a visa dodge. FTFA:

          The source said that means the company will take advantage of rules governing intra-company transfers, which require employees to work for at least one year at a company subsidiary before being transferred to the U.S. He says the result will be a net disadvantage for Canada.

          How much will these trainees cost our universal health care system? It's not like, as trainees, they're going to be making beaucoup bux.

          • I kind of ignored that comment in the article I'm not really clear who the source is and lets face it immigration issues will always have people interested in looking at the worst possible outcome and explaining it that way. It isn't Mexican farm workers doing jobs Americans don't want to do, it is Mexicans, some with cartel ties ... Yeah some do but the vast majority.

            Not going to happen but the least they could do is since they are immigrating to work for a foreign companies benefit force MS to pay for the

    • You want to block companies from hiring the best workers at the best price? If a Canadian company can't hire the best workers for the best price, a foreign company will. What's your plan for blocking Canadians from buying the best software (which will be foreign if you get your way) at the best price? What about blocking them from buying the best cars, tvs, phones, etc at the best price?

    • by Toth ( 36602 )

      Here is what I read:

      Microsoft is building a training center.
      They will be training folks from Canada as well as folks from other countries.

      Microsoft Obscuristan has a young person they would like to train so they send him to the Microsoft training center in Canada.

      They are not bringing them here to sew shirts in a sweatshop (or any IT equivalant) they are bringing them here to train.

      It is a net benefit to Canada. It has a net positive effect on jobs available to Canadians.

      From:
      http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/r [cic.gc.ca]

    • "We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country, we have a surplus, and with some provinces having over 10% unemployment rates Harper is seemingly doing everything he can to keep Canadians out of Canadian jobs."

      If you think anyone of the parties in government gives a damn about you then you need to learn about the myth of "balance" in capitalist societies

      http://homepages.law.asu.edu/~... [asu.edu]

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C... [wikipedia.org]

      Overthrowing governments

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

      http://www.amazon.com/W [amazon.com]

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      First rule of a government leaning towards authoritarionism is making exceptions for those that they like.
      It's often about putting some people above the law, and they frequently find a group to demonise to put below the law as well. It's against the entire idea of western civilisation of justice for all. However they don't care, they just don't get this civilisation thing. Fucking barbarians in suits.
    • ...Harper is seemingly doing everything he can to keep Canadians out of Canadian jobs.

      Fucking neocons.

      Fucking neocons? Fucking traitors, I say. I also despair for our country under Harper's dict - er, leadership. His ultimate goal seems to be to turn Canada into America's bitch and/or the stooge of any multinational corporation wanting to bend us over and take advantage of us. We used to have a good reputation internationally and some influence on the world stage - hell, we used to have *autonomy*. Now we're increasingly sticking our nose into other countries' business at the behest of our cousins north of

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country, we have a surplus, and with some provinces having over 10% unemployment rates Harper is seemingly doing everything he can to keep Canadians out of Canadian jobs.

      Incorrect. Harper is a skilled politician that does things he knows about. Like oil. He knows a lot about oil. He knows oil provides jobs, and good paying ones at that. He knows anything that threatens oil will make it less profitable, and thus, make it less money and hurt Canada.

      Of course, Ha

    • by lazarus ( 2879 )

      Ya. Fucking neocons... I say bring back the stripper visas [owjn.org] that the Liberals put in place!

      Seriously, you should try removing your head from your ass. All politicians are criminals. The Conservatives want more foreign techs, the Liberals want more foreign strippers. That's the way the world works -- try not to get so polarized about it.

    • We do not have a shortage of CS workers in this country, we have a surplus, and with some provinces having over 10% unemployment rates Harper is seemingly doing everything he can to keep Canadians out of Canadian jobs.

      Fucking neocons.

      There is probably some clauses in the deal that state that they will allow two for one. Two foreign for one domestic. Not fair you say? Well, it will cause a depletion of jobs from Silicon valley as permanent jobs move north. For northerners (we Canadians), there should be an increase in jobs for domestically qualified software developers. Why, we may even see an immigration of US citizens to Canada because of it. The net benefit will, of course, be corporate tax revenue for Canada. If MS comes to Que

  • Someone's getting a nice big bribe!

  • By changes made by the same government that has now opened yet another back door. Can you say "never let your left hand know what your right hand is doing"? Or other phases about hands...
  • by X!0mbarg ( 470366 ) on Saturday December 13, 2014 @04:46PM (#48590749)

    Until recently, McDonalds and Tim Horton's in the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) have been doing this sort of thing for years. Usually in the form of 'minority hiring' that shuns the citizenry. They got their hands smacked soundly over it, and now are being watched like a hawk.

    URL Reference here:
    http://www.vancouversun.com/li... [vancouversun.com]

    Now Microsoft is going to do it en masse, taking away the positions from Canadian citizens that have been training here...

    There will be a reckoning over this one.

    • The biggest issue is that older people - who often either don't understand or don't care about much of this - vote for the conservative government that's currently in power. The younger demographic - who are getting thoroughly screwed by the current government in terms of less jobs, selling off of domestic natural resources, and increasing cost of education/housing/etc - don't seem to get out to vote. Now to be fair, some of this is due to the government screwing with the rules around voting (particularly a

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Plenty of Vancouver Microsoft-Nokia staff were layed off or terminated in the period just before this announcement. Many are not yet even back on their feet.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    That big MS office in the Bay Area was really expensive to operate. Steve Balmer was OK with it but the new CEO no.

    Now it's mostly gone but the need is still there. So the solution is simple: off-shore (or off-border) the positions to Canada and bring in the Indians, Chinese, and laid-off Americans. All for a fraction of the initial cost!! Canada is also more pro-employers than the US in many ways (ex. taxes in some areas, free healthcare, etc)...

    Now, Harper is pro-immigration (numbers are hitting the r

  • Even in Canada, sadly.

    Rope, tree, politician. Some assembly required.

  • After a move like that, is it any wonder that Microsoft gets so many contracts with the government of Canada? It's another sad day for open source in Canada when it is so obvious that the GoC is in Microsoft's pocket.

  • Buffett's secretary Bosanek pays a tax rate of 35.8 percent of income, while Buffett pays a rate at 17.4 percent on profit.
    http://news.yahoo.com/warren-b... [yahoo.com]
    You're paying Income tax on your salary, not savings.
    Tell Govt to impose tax on Company revenues, not profits.
    http://wh.gov/iCfVS [wh.gov]

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