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Security The Media Politics

Syrian Electronic Army Takes Credit For News Site Hacking 24

New submitter ddtmm writes The Syrian Electronic Army is claiming responsibility for the hacking of multiple news websites, including CBC News. Some users trying to access the CBC website reported seeing a pop-up message reading: "You've been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA)." It appears the hack targeted a network used by many news organizations and businesses. A tweet from an account appearing to belong to the Syrian Electronic Army suggested the attacks were meant to coincide with the U.S. Thanksgiving on Thursday. The group claimed to have used the domain Gigya.com, a company that offers businesses a customer identity management platform, to hack into other sites via GoDaddy, its domain registrar. Gigya is "trusted by more than 700 leading brands," according to its website. The hacker or hackers redirected sites to the Syrian Electronic Army image that users saw. Gigya's operations team released a statement Thursday morning saying that it identified an issue with its domai registrar at 6:45 a.m. ET. The breach "resulted in the redirect of the Gigya.com domain for a subset of users," the company said. Among the websites known to be hacked so far are New York Times, Chicago Tribune, CNBC, PC World, Forbes, The Telegraph, Walmart and Facebook.
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Syrian Electronic Army Takes Credit For News Site Hacking

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  • Syrian Electronic Army has truly shown that they are a force to be reckoned with by inconveniencing a handful of websites.
    I haven't really heard of them, but apparently they are a thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Electronic_Army [wikipedia.org]
    • by ladoga ( 931420 )
      But hey, it runs Linux. :)
      http://sea.sy/article/id/2048/... [sea.sy]
    • by Anonymous Coward

      This is script-kiddie level of hacking, and nothing to really be concerned about.

      Point 1: None of the news sites were hacked, and the browsers were redirected using javascript inserted into an advertising unit
      Point 2: Only people "logged in" to said news sites saw it. Thus the implication of the user management.

      Any actual "hacking" was isolated to one site, the site being used by all these news sites user management. This is akin to the same kind of malware "update your flash player" redirects. The problem

      • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
        I had the backed message pop up once for me, and I was never logged into any of the affected sites.
  • http://www.oprah.com/ [oprah.com]

    Since hours actually and seems no one has noticed there yet or they are unable to fix it, or I get a cashed version of the site.

    (And please don't ask me why I visited that site ;) )

  • http://www.independent.co.uk/n... [independent.co.uk]

    (how could I not click on that one?)

    Hack relies on Javascript.

  • Gigya.com, a company that offers businesses a customer identity management platform

    A "customer identity management platform".

    That means, you're not the consumer, your the consumable. Could it sound any more sinister?

  • "claiming responsibility for the hacking of multiple news websites, including CBC News" - CBC being the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "suggested the attacks were meant to coincide with the U.S. Thanksgiving on Thursday" - which had very little effect on us Canadians, seeing as our Thanksgiving was a month ago. Smooth move, morons.
  • Headline corrected for accuracy ...

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