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UK's Blair Dismisses Online Anti ID-Card Petition 377

Posted by kdawson
from the no-is-an-answer-too dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Prime Minister Tony Blair has responded personally via email to 28,000 online petitioners opposing the UK's planned identity card scheme, and has closed the online petition. The email reads: 'We live in a world in which people, money and information are more mobile than ever before. Terrorists and international criminal gangs increasingly exploit this to move undetected across borders and to disappear within countries. Terrorists routinely use multiple identities — up to 50 at a time... ID cards which contain biometric recognition details and which are linked to a National Identity Register will make this much more difficult.'"
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UK's Blair Dismisses Online Anti ID-Card Petition

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  • Better link (Score:5, Informative)

    by baadger (764884) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:32AM (#18079056)
    Link to the actual petition -> here [pm.gov.uk]
    • by baadger (764884)
      Anyone got the link to the response?
      • Re:Better link (Score:5, Informative)

        by blane.bramble (133160) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:10AM (#18079246) Homepage
        E-petition: Response from the Prime Minister

        The e-petition to "scrap the proposed introduction of ID cards" has now closed. The petition stated that "The introduction of ID cards will not prevent terrorism or crime, as is claimed. It will be yet another indirect tax on all law-abiding citizens of the UK". This is a response from the Prime Minister, Tony Blair.

        The petition calling for the Government to abandon plans for a National ID Scheme attracted almost 28,000 signatures - one of the largest responses since this e-petition service was set up. So I thought I would reply personally to those who signed up, to explain why the Government believes National ID cards, and the National Identity Register needed to make them effective, will help make Britain a safer place.

        The petition disputes the idea that ID cards will help reduce crime or terrorism. While I certainly accept that ID cards will not prevent all terrorist outrages or crime, I believe they will make an important contribution to making our borders more secure, countering fraud, and tackling international crime and terrorism. More importantly, this is also what our security services - who have the task of protecting this country - believe.

        So I would like to explain why I think it would be foolish to ignore the opportunity to use biometrics such as fingerprints to secure our identities. I would also like to discuss some of the claims about costs - particularly the way the cost of an ID card is often inflated by including in estimates the cost of a biometric passport which, it seems certain, all those who want to travel abroad will soon need.

        In contrast to these exaggerated figures, the real benefits for our country and its citizens from ID cards and the National Identity Register, which will contain less information on individuals than the data collected by the average store card, should be delivered for a cost of around £3 a year over its ten-year life.

        But first, it's important to set out why we need to do more to secure our identities and how I believe ID cards will help. We live in a world in which people, money and information are more mobile than ever before. Terrorists and international criminal gangs increasingly exploit this to move undetected across borders and to disappear within countries. Terrorists routinely use multiple identities - up to 50 at a time. Indeed this is an essential part of the way they operate and is specifically taught at Al-Qaeda training camps. One in four criminals also uses a false identity. ID cards which contain biometric recognition details and which are linked to a National Identity Register will make this much more difficult.

        Secure identities will also help us counter the fast-growing problem of identity fraud. This already costs £1.7 billion annually. There is no doubt that building yourself a new and false identity is all too easy at the moment. Forging an ID card and matching biometric record will be much harder.

        I also believe that the National Identity Register will help police bring those guilty of serious crimes to justice. They will be able, for example, to compare the fingerprints found at the scene of some 900,000 unsolved crimes against the information held on the register. Another benefit from biometric technology will be to improve the flow of information between countries on the identity of offenders.

        The National Identity Register will also help improve protection for the vulnerable, enabling more effective and quicker checks on those seeking to work, for example, with children. It should make it much more difficult, as has happened tragically in the past, for people to slip through the net.

        Proper identity management and ID cards also have an important role to play in preventing illegal immigration and illegal working. The effectiveness on the new biometric technology is, in fact, already being seen. In trials using this technology on visa applications at just nine overseas posts, our officials have already uncovered 1,400 pe
        • Re:Better link (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Slashamatic (553801) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @07:00AM (#18079774)

          Tony Blair is exceptionally intelligent man with absolute faith in his beliefs. He believes in the identity card system. He also believed that Afghanistan was now Taliban free and invading Iraq was a good idea to solve terrorism.

          He seems to ignore the frequency with which the existing Police National Computer system is abused by both civillians and force members. He also seems to ignore the existing government success rate with major IT projects. Lastly he seems to ignore the problems with biometric ID card systems.

          Absolute conviction in your own beliefs is extremely dangerous in a politician. It makes you blind to better counsel.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Hatta (162192)
            Tony Blair is exceptionally intelligent man with absolute faith in his beliefs.

            So what you're saying is, he's a man of contradictions.
        • Misused already (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Frodrick (666941) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @07:36AM (#18079946)

          I also believe that the National Identity Register will help police bring those guilty of serious crimes to justice. They will be able, for example, to compare the fingerprints found at the scene of some 900,000 unsolved crimes against the information held on the register.

          Blair already plans to misuse the data. Suddenly he regards a measure that was meant only to stop terrorists and illegal immigration as a means to solve every open crime of the last 50 years!

          Compared to Tony Blair, Big Brother was a piker.

          Some guy has already submitted a petition to reopen the "scrap Id card" petition. [ReopenIDpetition]

        • Re:Better link (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Catullus (30857) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @08:52AM (#18080376) Journal
          I don't have the energy to refute all of the points in Tony Blair's response, but here are a couple of quick comments.

          it is clear that if we want to travel abroad, we will soon have no choice but to have a biometric passport.

          This is a red herring that is repeated with annoying frequency. ICAO requirements [icao.int] state that the only required biometric is a digitised photo, which new UK passports already contain [bbc.co.uk]. There's no need for fingerprints, retinal scans, etc.

          Secure identities will also help us counter the fast-growing problem of identity fraud. This already costs £1.7 billion annually.

          The majority of fraud reported as "identity fraud" is credit card fraud. ID cards will be no use at stopping this, unless you require people to show their ID when buying anything. In particular, the "£1.7 billion" figure is nonsense [spy.org.uk].

          I also believe that the National Identity Register will help police bring those guilty of serious crimes to justice. They will be able, for example, to compare the fingerprints found at the scene of some 900,000 unsolved crimes against the information held on the register. Another benefit from biometric technology will be to improve the flow of information between countries on the identity of offenders.

          Nice to know that the Government has already gone back on its assurance in 2005 [telegraph.co.uk] that the ID register wouldn't be used for "fishing expeditions" - also nice to know that our details will be shared with some unspecified other countries.

          The additional cost of the ID cards is expected to be less than £30 or £3 a year for their 10-year lifespan.

          Not according to an independent report [lse.ac.uk].
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by mdwh2 (535323)
          As I have said, it is clear that if we want to travel abroad, we will soon have no choice but to have a biometric passport. We estimate that the cost of biometric passports will account for 70% of the cost of the combined passports/id cards. The additional cost of the ID cards is expected to be less than £30 or £3 a year for their 10-year lifespan.

          We already have biometric passports in the UK - and that has already given a hefty increase in the price.

          As for his whinging that the price of an ID c
    • by datafr0g (831498) * <datafrog.gmail@com> on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:40AM (#18079090) Homepage
      27,964 signatures... naaah, we know better right Blair? They're really 559 new and improved terrorists with "up to 50 identities" each!
    • by bad_fx (493443)
      Ah thanks! Anybody see any details of when the petition was created? I'm wondering how long it took to get those signatures. Ff you view all petitions and sort by start date.. despite not really showing any start date... this one is still very close to the bottom. So I think it's been going for quite a while. Perhaps partly killed by apathy. *sigh*
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:29AM (#18079360)
      No one ever questioned if this could be useful for the governments.
      Just like no one ever questioned if DNA registers could at least theoretically be useful.
      This is not what the petition is about. It's about the fact that all registers can and will be mis-used "for the better".

      And that's an awful lot of lets-be-afraid-of-terrorists mumbo-jumbo. I'd say, let's understand what makes terrorists do what they do. Let's analyze and talk about that. Perhaps is it linked with the gigantic abuse of poor people in poor countries led by todays imperialistic crusades.
  • by gd23ka (324741) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:43AM (#18079110) Homepage

    Slaves,

    When your masters gives you something, you take it. I'm giving you a nice
    new collar so you can't hide or run away. The global plantation has
    grown to such a size we just have to have smart chains and collars.
  • Here's a sample (Score:5, Insightful)

    by naich (781425) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:46AM (#18079122) Homepage
    "The petition calling for the Government to abandon plans for a National ID Scheme attracted almost 28,000 signatures - one of the largest responses since this e-petition service was set up. So I thought I would reply personally to those who signed up, to explain why the Government believes National ID cards, and the National Identity Register needed to make them effective, will help make Britain a safer place." Translation: "Sod the petition. We're not listening to you. You are all wrong." No need to read any further really. I didn't really need to read the rest.
    • by CmdrGravy (645153)
      I really wonder why they have set up this on-line petition in the first place when it's clear already that it's not going to make a blind bit of notice to any policies this government actually, attempt, to enact.

      Cynically I might think they are simply using the system to target the most active people opposed to their schemes so they can deluge them with tailored propoganda and try to change their minds and that having a petition on-line will reduce the impact and exposure of having people come to Downing st
    • by rf0 (159958)
      I'm paraphrasing / can't remember where I heard it from but "The goverment should be afraid of the people, not the other way around". The UK is definitely starting to look like we are afraid of the government
    • http://politics.guardian.co.uk/publicservices/sto r y/0,,2012405,00.html [guardian.co.uk]
      Downing Street to send Blair emails to 2 million road pricing protesters
      Furious minister resists policy concessions
      E-petitions site creator hails changing democracy

      Will Woodward, Patrick Wintour and Dan Milmo
      Wednesday February 14, 2007
      The Guardian

      Downing Street will respond to a surge of support for a petition on its website condemning its road pricing plans, which could reach 2m signatures by next week.

      With Douglas Alexa

  • by lupine_stalker (1000459) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:48AM (#18079130)
    The point of the petition was that we don't care that the 'Terrorists' COULD POSSIBLY use our ID details to accomplish their nefarious schemes. However, we do object to the DEFINATE invasion of our privacy in order to prevent something that MIGHT happen.
    Note the difference.
  • And another one... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by welsh git (705097) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:49AM (#18079134) Homepage
    The anti-congestion charge one has racked up over 1.5 million signatures, and that too is going to be ignored.

    Last week I created a petition asking the government to actually pay notice to the petition service that *THEY* set up, and not just give it lip-service when it suits them... That petition request was rejected.

    So much for democracy :(
    • by Cheesey (70139)
      The anti-congestion charge one has racked up over 1.5 million signatures, and that too is going to be ignored.

      Yes. About 2 million [bbc.co.uk] British people went on the anti Iraq war march in London. Blair ignored them. And we all know how well that turned out.

      In any case, the media is working as hard as it can to link ANPR protesters to terrorism [bbc.co.uk]. Some guy has been sending letter bombs to organisations involved with ANPR and congestion charging. The implication? Same as always: "If we don't have $CIVIL_LIBERTIES_VIOL
    • This petition is, as I write this, the #1 petition on the "Most Popular" list, with 1,672,571 signatures. It charges that "The idea of tracking every vehicle at all times is sinister and wrong." Its deadline is "today," the 20th. I'm interested in seeing what happens to it.

      By the way, does that site have any way of verifying that there are actually 1.67M supporters as opposed to three supporters plus non-Brits, multiple clicks, fake names, and spambots?
      • Yes. I believe the petition confirms your details against the electoral role - when I signed it asked for my home address etc.
  • by rj21 (852127) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:50AM (#18079136)
    "Prime Minister Tony Blair has...... closed the online petition."

    There was a deadline for signatures and it has passed. Blair has responded to the petitioners after the petition was complete. That sounds more like he was pissed of with it and closed the petition. The fact that the prime minister personally closed the petition was the item in this story that pissed me off the most and that wasn't even true.

    There's plenty we can moan at Blair for without making things up.
    • Downing Street to send Blair emails to 2 million road pricing protesters Furious minister resists policy concessions E-petitions site creator hails changing democracy Will Woodward, Patrick Wintour and Dan Milmo Wednesday February 14, 2007 The Guardian Downing Street will respond to a surge of support for a petition on its website condemning its road pricing plans, which could reach 2m signatures by next week. With Douglas Alexander, the transport secretary, resisting concessions, No 10 sources ackno
  • by c0l0 (826165) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:50AM (#18079140) Homepage
    But still not impossible. And those who rely on such dubious activities will still have the opportunity to fake their identities, which leads the whole endeavor ad absurdum, and leaves Joe Average stripped off of a great deal of the little privacy people (especially in the UK, spycams everywhere) still have left in our oh-so-great digital age. So let's just implement it anyways, despite 28K people publicly speaking out against it, because it's such a great idea... not.
    • If you lived in the UK, you would realise that the "spycams" are not everywhere, thanks for exaggerating the myth of the all intrusive CCTV camera.
      • >thanks for exaggerating the myth of the all intrusive CCTV camera
        I stood near Southwark Bridge in London recently and did a 360 and counted 27 cameras looking in my direction. Where I used to live (medium sized town) the high street and other major areas are awash with cameras. I now live in a small village and our community police officer asked if we'd be willing to put a hidden camera on our house to watch the local kids getting drunk(which frankly, I'm tempted by).
  • by marcello_dl (667940) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:51AM (#18079144) Homepage Journal
    If terrorists justify everything, terrorists are an irresistible weapon for a dishonest government.

    In Italy the communist BR have appeared in two occasions lately. Some years ago they killed two people, D'Antona and Biagi, the second one was working on a law on new type of flexible work contracts. Result, the Biagi bill gets passed with nobody daring to make a discussion. Same kind of laws in france wrecked the government caused unrest.

    Ten days ago a police operation finds terrorists who were plotting against berlusconi et al. Media start talking about terrorism again and a national demonstration in Vicenza against the planned increase of american military presence in the nearby base, having a sizable percentage of leftists, becomes a terrorist threat.

    People who started protesting because their city, Vicenza, is already too crowded first get commies using the occasion to burn flags, then they are looked upon the police as potential terrorists. Checkmate.

  • Closing the petition (Score:5, Informative)

    by iainl (136759) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:55AM (#18079158)
    Umm, I think Blair is a duplicitous murdering sack of shit as much as the next guy, but the petition was always going to end on the 15th of February as a fixed closing date. From the FAQ page:

    How long will my petition run for? You can decide how long your petition can run for and we will carry it for up to 12 months.
    Besides, telling 28,000 people that they've given the wrong answer, and should go away and think about it until they realise he's right is nothing. He did exactly the same to the more than a million people who marched in London against invading Iraq, and is about to do so to the 1.6 million who have signed the road pricing and car tracking scheme at the top of the "most popular" list on that site as well.
  • by bastard formula (1053804) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:56AM (#18079162)
    It's really easy to say, "Terrorists routinely do this." I suspect there is some truth to it in this case, but I don't like the whole "Take my word for it. The terrorists are always doing this." being a justification for whatever the fuck rights they wish to trample.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by CmdrGravy (645153)
      If Tony Blair hadn't spent most of the rest of his time in office lying through his teeth I might be inclined to believe him now but from what I've seen so far I've come the conclusion that he is a pathological liar and willing to say absolutely anything to anyone provided he thinks it will help him get his own way.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by SamSim (630795)

      It's really easy to say, "Terrorists routinely do this."

      Exactly my sentiments. If terrorism is a problem, where are the terrorists? Where are the endless terrorist attacks and counter-terrorist busts? We got bombed once [wikipedia.org] , like a year and a half ago. America hasn't been attacked at all in half a decade. Is that supposed to constitute a persistent looming threat? Because I, for one, could not care less.

  • The e-petition to "scrap the proposed introduction of ID cards" has now closed. The petition stated that "The introduction of ID cards will not prevent terrorism or crime, as is claimed. It will be yet another indirect tax on all law-abiding citizens of the UK". This is a response from the Prime Minister, Tony Blair.

    The petition calling for the Government to abandon plans for a National ID Scheme attracted almost 28,000 signatures - one of the largest responses since this e-petition service was set up. So

    • by Zocalo (252965)

      I'm actually rather disappointed in the response from the public to this poll. Just 28 thousand signatures after all the efforts of No2ID [no2id.net] and the political posturing, back-tracking and outright changes in tack that it prompted over the last few years? I'd say it was the normal apathy from the UK electorate, except that this is not the petition that has been generating all the fuss - that one has about 1.5 *million* signatures and is over the introduction of per-mile road charging for the most heavily cong

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by alexpage (210348)
        To be fair, No2ID [no2id.net] didn't particularly encourage people to sign this petition; they knew from the get-go that it would be a waste of time, compared to encouraging people to sign up to the No2ID campaign where they will be kept up-to-date with the latest news and given the oppotunity to participate in a local group campaigning to local government and media...
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by CmdrGravy (645153)

      I would also like to discuss some of the claims about costs - particularly the way the cost of an ID card is often inflated by including in estimates the cost of a biometric passport which, it seems certain, all those who want to travel abroad will soon need.

      This is bollocks, first of all there is no requirement from any country in the world for the kind of biometric information they are proposing putting on these ID cards and it would be a lot easier to change the current passports to include what they actually need to include without building this whole ID scheme around it.

    • >Terrorists routinely use multiple identities - up to 50 at a time
      Nice round number - what happens at 51 and who do they stop there?
    • >National Identity Register will make this much more difficult
      How? We already have national drivers license, passports etc and they get cloned routinely. What's so clever about this new one? It also becomes a single point of failure, crack that one and everyone trusts you, wrongly.
  • by iamacat (583406) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @04:58AM (#18079180)
    All 9/11 hijackers had a proper ID with no prior criminal record. I don't see how biometric ID would have solved anything besides making airport security more confident in letting them through. Known terrorists like Bin Laden would rather stay in their air conditioned caves and let grunts do all the work.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Blue Stone (582566)
      Biometric ID, and the ID databases are all about having a stream of data about the various activities of people ('securely linked to each person, hence biometric) so that that data can be trawled for patterns that will reveal suspicious activity.
  • by pembo13 (770295) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:02AM (#18079204) Homepage

    He's just doing the kiddie lie thing of telling a half truth. Of course such a system may/will make what he said harder for terrorist and the other boogey men - I don't doubt that in the same way that I don't doubt that if it is hard for me to breathe in a room due to lack of air a terrorist would also find it hard to breathe. If those things become difficult for everyone who isn't 100% "simon-says" follower then the terrorists will not be exempt.

    However, and I may just be misguided and paranoid, I find myself a lot more afraid of a large governments with massive databanks, financial caches, and military assets powered by men trained to be unquestioning soldiers (for better or worse) that some pissed off and somewhat oprressed (some might say cursed) terrorist.

    So yah I see much more potential for bad than potential for good - from what I hear we as Earthlings have a greater chance of Aophis destroying us than terrorist.

    • I myself am depressed by the idea that the database PM Blair wants set up might contain less info than the average store card, since that means that many of these protests would be moot anyway. This will, for many people, mandate what they're already doing freely, and charge a gov. tax to cover the costs.
      Then again, I seriously hope there aren't any major British stores requiring biometrics for their store cards. ("Signature and fingerprints, please--oh, and please let us gather a saliva sample.")
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Kokuyo (549451)
      I agree with you only partially. In the end, it will makes matters for Non-Simon-Says people much harder while not doing much against the terrorists. Here is why I believe that:

      I am one of those people who love to pose uncomfortable questions and defend unpopular ideas. I might be one of those people who suddenly spend hours checking into a flight overseas. At first it might be considered a coincidence but perhaps I'll rethink that when suddenly every routine traffic inspection takes, like, an hour until I
  • Inconceivable! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Tim Browse (9263) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:11AM (#18079256)
    An online petition has absolutely no effect! Film at 11!
  • One thing the the politicians never explain is how the ID card and biometric database is suppose to stop terrorists. I am sure that the system will allow for government agents, undercover policemen etc. to have multiple identities - ie that a given set of biometrics maps to more than one identity. So if the system allows 'authorised' multiple identities then I am sure that terrorists could subvert it to obtain multiple identities for themselves.
    • by CmdrGravy (645153)
      I don't think the terrorists will even need to go to these lengths. Since the last lot have been UK citizens and actually living here in the first place whether they had an ID card or not is totally irrelevant unless the government knows when they check the card that the person is actually a terrorist.

      I suspect the governments main method of deciding of whether people are terrorists or not is based on whether they've blown themselves up in a suicide bombing lately but even if its more sophisticated than tha
  • This was expected (Score:3, Informative)

    by LizardKing (5245) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:44AM (#18079450)

    Nothing surprising about this move. The petitions were only allowed for the same reason that public enquiries are allowed. They create an illusion of consultation, but because they usually come to the attention of only a few particularly interested people any opposition to the government view can be safely ignored. What the government failed to consider with online petitions are that they can be easily filled in by people once they have been informed of their existence by the same medium - the internet. This is why government sources described the person who came up wih the idea as an idiot last week (I'm not joking).

    In this particular case the comnpanies that stand to make a fortune from government contracts to bring in the ID card are the same companies providing directorships to former ministers, MPs and civil servants. The so called "revolving door". As the right dishonourable Tony Blair MP is soon to be out of a job he's more than likely to go the extra mile to keep these companies happy. He needs a job after leaving office, as his mortgage commitments are astronomical (again, I'm not joking).

  • trust (Score:2, Insightful)

    by bugi (8479)
    We don't trust the government -- simple as that.

    The reasons for implementing this may be noble now, but laws change and what will the data be used for then?
  • by MartinG (52587) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:46AM (#18079456) Homepage Journal
    We don't need you to patrinise us by attempting to explain why we are wrong My Blair. What many of us are trying to say to you is that we fully understand your viewpoint so you can stop explaining it to us. What we are saying to you is that you are wrong. Wrong because you don't have a very good understanding of security. Wrong because you have no ability to clearly judge the value this scheme will give us. Wrong because you have the terror threat out of proportion. Wrong because you are wasting our money on something we don't want or need.

    Your job is to represent our views, not to decide what is best for your self and explain to us why you think it is right.

    Honestly, I don't think you have the understanding of security issues to grasp why biometriecs are a very bad choice for personal security, nor do I think you have the imagination to forsee the abuses that could come of this. Combine these two things with your governments record on large scale IT projects and anyone can see that we are heading for disaster.
  • by alexpage (210348) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:58AM (#18079510)

    No2ID [no2id.net], the UK's leading campaign against the National Identity Card and the Database State, realised even before this petition was launched that the site exists only to encourage "fire and forget" activism from people. People signing up to No2ID are encouraged to subscribe to a fortnightly e-mail newsletter which keeps them up to date with the latest news on ID Cards in Government and across the country.

    The No2ID campaign has encouraged a 30% swing in public opinion against Identity Cards, has encouraged councils and other organisations across the country to oppose the Government's plans, and formed a wide alliance of political parties and unions from all sides of the spectrum in opposition to this scheme. It's unlikely that the Tories would have come out against ID cards (albeit in a half-arsed way) without No2ID's influence.

    If people want to make a difference, joining and supporting No2ID is the best way to do so. There are local groups nationwide, which can always benefit from more supporters.

  • by ettlz (639203) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @05:59AM (#18079518) Journal

    Fuck you all.

    We know best, and you know how to pay for it.

    Sincerely,
    HM Government.

  • Translation (Score:4, Insightful)

    by lisaparratt (752068) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @06:12AM (#18079566)
    We're at war with terrorists. We've always been at war with terrorists.

    The Party is never wrong.

    Big Blair is always watching you.
  • Join No2ID.org (Score:5, Informative)

    by Cally (10873) on Tuesday February 20, 2007 @06:25AM (#18079626) Homepage
    If you're a UK citizen and can see what a bad implementation of a disastrous idea this is going to turn out to be, please join no2id.org [no2id.net] and help in a practical way, as well as moaning about it on Slashdot! :)
  • It would be quite funny if Tony Blair's message was faked. Come to think of it, if it's a real message, sending mail to 28000 addresses was probably not the smartest way to not give spammers good ham fragments to bypass certain UKian spam filtered destinations.

    I'm just sayin'

  • No2ID, the leading anti-ID-Register campaign, have published a response [no2id.net] to Blair's claims.
  • ALL information should be available to everyone. Problem with a scheme such as this ID-card is that it empowers some institutions (like say banks or corporations) to have access to the data, but the man in the street hasn't got the same information available.

The only thing cheaper than hardware is talk.

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