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Republicans Databases Security United States Politics

Valuable Republican Donor Database Breached -- By Other Republicans (politico.com) 73

Politico reports: Staffers for Senate Republicans' campaign arm seized information on more than 200,000 donors from the House GOP campaign committee over several months this year by breaking into its computer system, three sources with knowledge of the breach told Politico... Multiple NRSC staffers, who previously worked for the NRCC, used old database login information to gain access to House Republicans' donor lists this year. The donor list that was breached is among the NRCC's most valuable assets, containing not only basic contact information like email addresses and phone numbers but personal information that could be used to entice donors to fork over cash -- information on top issues and key states of interest to different people, the names of family members, and summaries of past donation history... Donor lists like these are of such value to party committees that they can use them as collateral to obtain loans worth millions of dollars when they need cash just before major elections...

"The individuals on these lists are guaranteed money," said a Republican fundraiser. "They will give. These are not your regular D.C. PAC list"... The list has helped the NRCC raise over $77 million this year to defend the House in 2018... Though the House and Senate campaign arms share the similar goal of electing Republican candidates and often coordinate strategy in certain states, they operate on distinct tracks and compete for money from small and large donors.

Long-time Slashdot reader SethJohnson says the data breach "is the result of poor deprovisioning policies within the House Republican Campaign Committee -- allowing staff logins to persist after a person has left the organization."

NRCC officials who learned of the breach "are really pissed," one source told the site.

Valuable Republican Donor Database Breached -- By Other Republicans

Comments Filter:
  • "NRCC officials who learned of the breach "are really pissed,"

    And then they drowned their sorrows and got really pissed all over again.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Your solicitations will read something like, "Dear Jack. You and I both realize the importance of keeping our borders secure. But if Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, and George Soros have their way..."

    OTOH if you are one of the 200,000, it'll be more like "Dear Jack: Congratulations on [Jack's daughter] Sheri placing second in the state tennis tournament! ..."

  • There is no honor among thieves...on any side of the aisle!

  • Sounds a lot like someone may have "knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or exceeding authorized access" per 18 U.S. Code 1030. The literal text of this statute and its successors (parts of the Patriot Act, as well as the CFAA) wouldn't seem to apply to non-governmental systems; however, in practice, pretty much any computer system (including phones) is now covered by it, due to the interstate nature of the internet.

    What's good for the goose...right? Maybe they'll be dumb enough to persec--

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Sounds a lot like someone may have "knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or exceeding authorized access" per 18 U.S. Code 1030. The literal text of this statute and its successors (parts of the Patriot Act, as well as the CFAA) wouldn't seem to apply to non-governmental systems; however, in practice, pretty much any computer system (including phones) is now covered by it, due to the interstate nature of the internet.

      What's good for the goose...right? Maybe they'll be dumb enough to persec--i mean, prosecute them under the CFAA!

      They should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law, including those that knowingly used the information. The only reason they probably won't be was that it was a republican. Were it a democrat they would have fired up the outrage machine and turned it up to the max.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I mean, their logins weren't deprovisioned. So they just kept logging in. How is that a "data breach"? I mean I get the legal definition, but this is a cockup, rather than hacking or something.

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