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United States Politics Your Rights Online

Real-World Roadblocks To Implementing CISA 31

An anonymous reader writes: The recent approval of CISA (the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act) by the US Congress and Senate is paving the way for broader security collaboration. If and when CISA is ratified into law, the chief obstacles to cybersecurity collaboration within the private sector will remain. CISA promotes sharing – but when dealing with cyber threat data companies are also concerned about other mandates which may govern the information being shared. These include anti-trust, privacy, sectorial directives and data protection regulations that affect many multi-national organizations.
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Real-World Roadblocks To Implementing CISA

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 01, 2015 @01:49PM (#50842887)

    The recent approval of CISA .. by the US Congress and Senate is paving the way for yet more surveillance of the civilian population under the pretext of national security.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      "The recent approval of CISA .. by the US Congress and Senate is paving the way for yet more surveillance of the civilian population under the pretext of national security."

      Correct.

      The (mass surveillance) by the NSA and abuse by law enforcement is just more part and parcel of state suppression of dissent against corporate interests. They're worried that the more people are going to wake up and corporate centers like the US and canada may be among those who also awaken. See this vid with Zbigniew Brzezinski,

  • by whoever57 ( 658626 ) on Sunday November 01, 2015 @01:52PM (#50842897) Journal
    CISA isn't about sharing, it's about spying on our communications. [wired.com]
  • Wanna cyber?

    Show me everything baby, I wanna see it ALL. :D

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Congress probably wants to get as much data about multi-national corporations so that they can leverage that data to tax more money out of them. Meanwhile, customers are watching to see if those corporations are giving their private data to government and what that will mean for them and their families. So it's a lose-lose for corporations. Then the NSA is paying security experts and mathematicians and stockpiling all of that information for itself, while other government agencies (which are huge stockpi

  • That's why I'm urging my Congressman to vote for this, and for the Copyright Violation Persecution and Snuggling Act!
  • by koan ( 80826 )

    My opinion is that most everything I have read about CISA is "offering" already exist.
    The sharing already exist, and to date does little to stop the rape of networks.

    The main thing that caught my eye, and perhaps the entire reason for CISA, is too mitigate corporate liability in data sharing.
    That's the only new thing under this toxic sun, immunity for corporations.

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      No more parallel construction. The courts can be presented with clear path to the decrypted material as the company 'helped' from the start.
      Warrant? The users understood if the corporation saw something strange in any database it would, could, has, will share all data with law enforcement.
      This new US legal system really removes the final protections by getting US corporations to report on users by default with out the tricky questions of how or why the government even started looking :)
      Legal teams now
      • by koan ( 80826 )

        But doesn't everything you have stated mean that the "authorities" and "agencies" have become hopelessly dependent on this computer data gleaned from corporate and their own spying.

        This narrowing down of sources means one thing, all one has to do to avoid scrutiny is not use ANY of it.

        If anything, they have crippled themselves.

        • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
          Re "hopelessly dependent on this computer data gleaned from corporate and their own spying."
          Thats what "collect it all" is doing now but with no US legal cover. Re "avoid scrutiny is not use ANY of it."
          A lawyer will have to be found with a security clearance. Can a family afford that private sector cost for long with all reported accounts been frozen at the start of the long, secret investigation?
          That locks out a lot of the more skilled and charismatic legal teams from even been requested.
          So the gov s
  • The phrase "if *and* when" really grates my nerves. Especially when we've just had an article on Boolean logic come through recently. It's one or the other people. It cannot be both. One indicates a conditionality and the other indicates a certainty.

Truth is free, but information costs.

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