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Actual Results of Crimean Secession Vote Leaked 557

Posted by timothy
from the not-quite-as-advertised dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Forbes reported on Monday that The President of Russia's Council on Civil Society and Human Rights very briefly and supposedly by accident posted the actual results of the Crimean secession vote. According to the blog post, which has since been taken down, only 30% of Crimeans participated in the vote instead of the 83% participation officially advertised by Russia, and of that 30% only half voted for secession, which means that 15% of all Crimeans voted for secession rather than the 82% officially reported by Russia. There is no way for this claim to be verified as no foreign observers were allowed during the voting process. The vote is reportedly being conducted again during the 'May 11 referendum on the status of the so-called People's Republic of Donetsk.'" We've had a lot of discussion over the years about election methods and transparency; it would be interesting to hear from Ukranian readers in particular on this topic.
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Actual Results of Crimean Secession Vote Leaked

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  • Again? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jbmartin6 (1232050) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @12:56PM (#46930273)
    Given how many lies and half-truths have been circulated by the press about this, I am not sure I believe this at all.
  • by Dachannien (617929) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:04PM (#46930403)

    Seriously, DICE? I'm sitting here looking at the first few comments, hoping for a little clarity and maybe even some insightful discussion - you know, Slashdot style - when the window contents scroll up and a video ad, with sound, starts playing.

    I am done with this piece of shit website. How do I delete my account?

  • by Bacon Bits (926911) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:04PM (#46930405)

    Sometimes the only person who stands up to a bully is another bully.

  • Re:Again? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:11PM (#46930511)

    Is it any easier though? Sure, the Russians are probably fiddling everything they can, but do you think the west isn't?

  • by sharknado (3217097) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:12PM (#46930523)

    Why bother voting at all?

    Because we have to maintain the illusion of a democracy, that's why.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:13PM (#46930543)

    You're a Slashdot user. How can you possibly be so Internet-illiterate as to not be running an ad-blocker?

  • Re:Again? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:15PM (#46930579)

    It is, since it is well known that Crimea is heavily pro Russian. If you know anything about Crimea you would find it impossible to believe that they would vote to stay with Ukraine rather than join Russia or even that the result would be close like TFA claims.

  • Re:Again? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nexus7 (2919) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:16PM (#46930605)

    Most people in that region identify with Russia. They were looking at an EU austerity regime vs free money from Russia.

    Yeah, I find the original results easier to believe.

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by n1ywb (555767) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:18PM (#46930623) Homepage Journal

    One last thing that just about no one knows about. All of the major news outlets proclaimed Florida to Gore before voting was finished in Florida. Florida resides in two time zones and the northwest "handle" of Florida is heavily Republican. Many voters left lines while voting was open once Florida was called for Gore. IF that hadn't have happened, the recount wouldn't have been close at all.

    If that's really true, well, those folks who walked out have nobody to blame but themselves.

  • Re:well (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:21PM (#46930669)
    Wow. You really are never going to get over it. This stuff isn't new in the US, and JFK won in 1960 thanks almost entirely to the Daley family in Chicago. Nixon new it, and one of the handful of decent things he ever did was to let it go.

    ALL recounts showed Bush winning by a larger margin but Gore and his team of lawyers won't let it go. SCOTUS got involved at the request of Gore. He wouldn't let it go... just like you won't let it go.
  • by bigpat (158134) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:21PM (#46930679)

    There is a blatant information war going on on both sides of this.

    Here is basically what is going on:

    1. 1) US/EU has been actively trying to keep Russia from forming an Eurasian Union with some of the members of the former Soviet Union. (most probably because the people running US/EU foreign policy grew up with the Soviet Union and are afraid of repeating the cold war)
    2. 2) Russia pressured/bribed Ukraine to move towards the Russia side after a brief foray towards the EU.
    3. 3) The EU/US fomented an overthrow of the government in Ukraine probably facilitated by covert operations in order to prevent the Eurasian Union from coming together with Ukraine as its economic crossroad to Europe.
    4. 4) Russia tried to salvage something out of this collapse of the pro-Russian government by grabbing Crimea with its majority Russian population.
    5. 5) Russia is now fomenting separatists in Eastern Ukraine using the same tactics the CIA used in Kiev and the US/EU doesn't like it.

    ....

    Next) Either Russia invades and annexes Eastern Ukraine following the Crimea model or they simply foment separatism which either succeeds in splitting the country or causes a bloody crackdown by Kiev which further de-legitimizes that interim government.

    - Probably China is cheer leading this US/EU/Russia split on because if the EU and Russia are forced further apart, then it forces resource rich Russia towards China which needs all the wood/oil/natural gas/mining that Russia has to offer to sustain its manufacturing economy and China doesn't want a strong Eurasian Union coming together either. This has already started with announcements of greater cooperation with China.

    I think the bitter irony in all this is that the foreign policy leaders in the West that are so afraid of repeating the Cold War are precipitating something like it now because of that fear. Russia has every right to be concerned that it is stuck between a growing EU and China and that it needs to build up its own alliance in the middle. Their historical lesson is that a Europe united under Germany is a threat. It seems to me that the EU and US are being very shortsighted to have undercut Putin so blatantly and overtly in Ukraine. The US and EU needs a strong Russia and something like a Eurasian Alliance to counterbalance China to the East. If anything the EU should have invited Russia to join it to form an even greater Union that would be a direct counterbalance to China instead of just leaving Russia as a buffer state.

  • Re:Again? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:22PM (#46930685)

    The results of Crimea is not hard to believe. They had similar referendum with just as much support for Russia in the past. They voted in overwhelming majority to support greater autonomy and dual citizenship with Russia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crimean_referendum,_1994

    Note the date: 1994. No imaginary Russian troops to allegedly pressure Crimeans.

    Obama ain't fooling anyone with his propaganda. Sorry.

  • Re:well (Score:3, Insightful)

    by scubamage (727538) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:26PM (#46930781)
    Russia is seeing a country that is essentially on the brink of civil war right next to its borders. On top of that, that country happens to control many of the major resource pipelines into and out of Russia. They have a vested interest in keeping Ukraine stable. Do you expect that the US would do any differently if Juarez or Tijuana truly became a Narco-stronghold? Don't rush so quickly to judge. The media on both sides of the pond spins the story to make their respective side look good.
  • Re:well (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ericloewe (2129490) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:31PM (#46930853)

    [Citation Needed]

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PortHaven (242123) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:34PM (#46930889) Homepage

    Mexico is a country on our border that's been near at civil war and a drug and crime mecca. So um, yes...we haven't invaded Mexico....(not sure on vice-versa)

  • Re:Misleading (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:36PM (#46930919)

    The question of the referendum was posed as:
    [ ] Do you support Crimea joining Russian Federation?
    [ ] Do you support Crimea returning to its 1992 constitution and being part of Ukraine?
    Exactly one box must have been ticked for the ballot to be considered valid. Under the 1992 constitution Crimea was almost an independent state, with its own diplomatic relations etc, and it would have the power to secede from Ukraine anyway. So there was no option for status quo, no option to vote "no" at all, the only way to express such opinion was to boycott the referendum.

    It's as though the referendum was "Mind if Crimea joins Russia?" -- "OK" / "No, I don't mind".

  • Re:well (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:37PM (#46930929)

    You really need to more work in educating yourself beyond what Putin tells you to post.

  • by ericloewe (2129490) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:37PM (#46930939)

    3) Deserves a massive [Citation Needed] sticker. The only covert operations of which there is any proof is the massive Russian involvement.

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MightyMartian (840721) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:37PM (#46930941) Journal

    If the actual poll results are true, it suggest Ukraine is not that divided fundamentally at all, and that a small group of pro-Russian agitators lead by Russian military personnel out of uniform are creating this civil war.

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by smooth wombat (796938) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:43PM (#46931013) Homepage Journal
    They have a vested interest in keeping Ukraine stable.

    So why are Russian troops and Russian-trained operatives fomenting the unrest we're seeing? Don't you think Russia would want Ukraine to avoid what's going on? Why lie about ethnic Russians supposedly being targeted when they could provide not a single shred of evidence to show this was happening?

    Russia started this because the people of Ukraine got fed up being used as a pawn by Russia and all the corruption their former leader was doing. That is why they opened up his former residence to show where the Ukrainian people's money was really going instead of for roads, electricity, etc.

    Russia is the one who is causing the problem and the lies of the Crimean vote show the reality of the situation. Putin has become a modern day Stalin, though without the gulags. From dictatorial control of the media, the false imprisonment of political rivals and those who oppose his authoritarian rule, manipulating vote counts and election qualifications, goon squads to rough up and kill opponents, he has taken Stalin's playbook and updated it for the modern era.
  • Re:well (Score:4, Insightful)

    by scubamage (727538) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:44PM (#46931039)
    Not so fast. [npr.org] We have aided Mexico militarily by sending special forces for training, and also bringing Mexican troops to the US for training. Russia itself has not invaded Ukraine. Russian loyalists however have occupied several government buildings/regions because they're not a fan of the Pro-NATO, Pro-West stance taken by the Kieven government. I'm not going to say Russia is entirely innocent here, after all there were supposedly photos of Russian special forces training Eastern Ukrainians [cbsnews.com], but that behavior is nearly the same as what the US has done with Mexico in the drug war. We picked the side we liked and benefitted us the most, we gave them equipment and training, and told the other side that if they spill over our borders we will christen them with hellfire missiles.
  • Re:Again? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MightyMartian (840721) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:47PM (#46931069) Journal

    How could the West have fiddled the Crimean referendum when the Russians controlled the territory, ran the polls and had a willing and colluding agent in the government of Crimea?

  • by Improv (2467) <pgunn@dachte.org> on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @01:48PM (#46931081) Homepage Journal

    Without consent of the Ukrainian government, such a vote would not mean anything more than, say, if my neighbourhood in Brooklyn voted to secede. The current Russian occupation of Crimea is not valid.

  • by guacamole (24270) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:09PM (#46931377)

    Forbes reported on Monday that The President of Russia's Council on Civil Society and Human Rights very briefly and supposedly by accident posted the actual results of the Crimean secession vote.

    Forbes is one of the primary neo-con internet mouthpieces. They have posted an incredible amount of ridiculous, 100% emotionally driven, and 0% fact-based articles on the Ukraine conflict.

    Moreover, the claim that's based on a website that was taken down is pure garbage. At least give us an archive version, please?

    There is no way for this claim to be verified as no foreign observers were allowed during the voting process.

    Foreign observers were allowed in Crimea, and I have seen many on TV, from Finland, Serbia, etc. If Americans, Germans, or British refused to attend, that's their problem.

    The vote is reportedly being conducted again during the 'May 11 referendum on the status of the so-called People's Republic of Donetsk.'"

    The vote is NOT conducted AGAIN. That's a different referendum, concerning a different territory and has nothing to do with Crimea.

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jklovanc (1603149) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:09PM (#46931383)

    Ukrainian new unelected leadership is more like Hitler.

    First all the current leaders were elected to Parliament. The only "unelected" part is the post of acting President. That was done when the previous president abandoned his post and fled. Second the main political party is Batkivshchyna [wikipedia.org] which looks like a pretty progressive party. Show me how they compare to Hitler in what they have actually done. If you mean the few radical outliers the same thing could be said for the Republican Party.

    Aggressively moved right away to abolish equal rights for Russian and Russian-speaking population who make up almost half the country.

    You might want to look at the demographics [wikipedia.org] of the Ukraine. The Russian speaking percentage is 30%. The Ukrainian speaking percentage is 67%. So the less than 1/3 Russian speaking portion is nowhere near half. Take a look at this map [wikipedia.org]. Most of the Ukraine is primarily Ukrainian speakers. Notice how much of the Russian speaking population is concentrated in the Crimea. I agree that should have been a referendum in the Crimea but it was done improperly under vary shady circumstances. Democracy does not work very well during political upheaval. The only thing close to a rights issue was a bill to make Ukrainian the only official language. The bill was passed by the parliament but vetoed by the President. It is not in effect. Do you have any other examples?

    Russia has no choice but to get involved.

    There are other way to "get involved" than sending in special forces, supplying arms to insurgents, holding large military exercises on the borders and threatening invasion. Those are the tactics of an uncivilized bully. Russia won't even admit that the Holodomor [wikipedia.org] happened.

  • by gman003 (1693318) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:09PM (#46931387)

    There is a blatant information war going on on both sides of this.

    Here is basically what is going on:

    1. 1) US/EU has been actively trying to keep Russia from forming an Eurasian Union with some of the members of the former Soviet Union. (most probably because the people running US/EU foreign policy grew up with the Soviet Union and are afraid of repeating the cold war)
    2. 2) Russia pressured/bribed Ukraine to move towards the Russia side after a brief foray towards the EU.

    With you so far.

    1. 3) The EU/US fomented an overthrow of the government in Ukraine probably facilitated by covert operations in order to prevent the Eurasian Union from coming together with Ukraine as its economic crossroad to Europe.

    I have seen little evidence of US/EU covert operations in the revolution, and I've been following it closely. There was definitely propaganda support, maybe political pressure, perhaps even covert advisors trying to make sure that the revolution was successful, but it was by and large a Ukrainian revolution.

    The thrust of the revolution was forcing out a government that was blatantly corrupt and increasingly dictatorial, not to join up with the EU. While I usually frown on getting involved in other country's problems, I don't think I could get too upset about lending a hand to a revolution that was forcing out such a government, particularly when the support is only aiding a revolution that would have happened anyways, not forcing a revolution that the people did not really want

    1. 4) Russia tried to salvage something out of this collapse of the pro-Russian government by grabbing Crimea with its majority Russian population.

    Crimea is "majority Russian" only because Stalin forced out the native Tatars. And while there was a separatist movement (nonviolent) before the revolution, it was a secessionist movement, not a Russian one. There was no way they got the numbers they claimed legitimately.

    1. 5) Russia is now fomenting separatists in Eastern Ukraine using the same tactics the CIA used in Kiev and the US/EU doesn't like it.

    Russia's tactics are different. Even if you assume CIA involvement in the revolution, they let the actual people perform the revolution - which means a good number of people had to be ready to fight for it.

    Russia is sending in their own military. They are the ones fighting this counter-revolution - not the people they claim to be helping. This is by and large a Russian military intervention.

    The western revolution was fought with molotov cocktails by students and retired veterans. The eastern revolution is being fought by armed and trained soldiers, following radio orders from Moscow. It's impossible to claim they're the same tactics, which means it is completely valid to treat them differently.

    The CIA isn't mad that Russia is using the same tactics - they're mad because Russia is unable to find enough people to actually fight this war in Ukraine, so they're just sending in soldiers and pretending it's a popular rebellion.

    ....

    Next) Either Russia invades and annexes Eastern Ukraine following the Crimea model or they simply foment separatism which either succeeds in splitting the country or causes a bloody crackdown by Kiev which further de-legitimizes that interim government.

    - Probably China is cheer leading this US/EU/Russia split on because if the EU and Russia are forced further apart, then it forces resource rich Russia towards China which needs all the wood/oil/natural gas/mining that Russia has to offer to sustain its manufacturing economy and China doesn't want a strong Eurasian Union coming together either. This has already started with announcements of greater cooperation with China.

    I think the bitter irony in all this is that the foreign policy leaders in the West that are so afra

  • Re:Again? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Katatsumuri (1137173) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:25PM (#46931649)

    First, any public poll with close to 90% outcome should be suspect.

    There are 10% Crimean Tatar and 25% Ukrainian nationals in the Crimea, that makes Putin's figures unbelievable.

    And even people who identify with Russia do not necessarily all want to actually join it under Putin's regime.

    So, even though there are no proofs for this story and you are right to doubt it, too, you should doubt the official results more.

    Also, regardless of any poll results, the poll was illegal under Ukrainian law, and you cannot legally come to another country, conduct a regional poll, and take a part of the territory.

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Rich0 (548339) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:27PM (#46931693) Homepage

    If the actual poll results are true, it suggest Ukraine is not that divided fundamentally at all, and that a small group of pro-Russian agitators lead by Russian military personnel out of uniform are creating this civil war.

    And if actual poll results are true, it would make them like a lot of US elections, where most people sit it out and the fringes determine how the country will be run.

    If this were just about electing a mayor I'd agree. However, the referendum was controversial and many boycotted it.

    If the local KKK had a referendum on whether black people should be placed in concentration camps or just shot on sight, and only 0.001% of the population turned out, would the conclusion be that most people don't care about black people being shot on sight?

  • Re:well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rahvin112 (446269) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @02:28PM (#46931705)

    Russian intelligence operatives along with Spetnaz Russian special forces out of uniform are occupying Ukrainian government offices. They are doing so with the assistance of several prominent Ukrainian oligarchs that backed and supported Yankovitch. It's been estimated that fewer than 15% of the "protestors" are actually even Ukrainian and many of those that are Ukrainian are being supported (and paid) by those oligarchs.

    When US special forces out of uniform but still acting at the direction of the US government are seizing Mexican government offices by force let me know.

  • Re:Bullshit (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Katatsumuri (1137173) on Tuesday May 06, 2014 @03:17PM (#46932313)

    Once again, the "abolishing" did not happen. Imagine people who felt that Ukrainian unity and sovereignty was under threat from that law, people who felt repressed by the previous administration and promised to their voters to fight. I am not advocating one way or another, but I understand why they tried to revoke that law. I'm also glad that they managed to moderate themselves.

    I also don't want to delve into whether Crimea was a "gift". In any case, Russia recognized Ukrainian borders in the 90s, and even promised to protect them. And now we have an aggressive takeover.

    It is sad to see how some people support revising of historical borders using military force. If this becomes popular, the world will be a very violent place. There are so many regions that changed owners throughout history.

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