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VK CEO Fired, Says Company Under Kremlin Control 149

Posted by timothy
from the finally-those-capitalist-pigs-oh-wait dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The embattled founder of VK, Russia's largest social networking site, said this week that the company is now 'under the complete control' of two oligarchs with close ties to President Vladimir Putin. In a VK post published Monday, Pavel Durov said he's been fired as CEO of the website, claiming that he was pushed out on a technicality, and that he only heard of it through media reports."
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VK CEO Fired, Says Company Under Kremlin Control

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  • by alphatel (1450715) * on Tuesday April 22, 2014 @10:52AM (#46815085)
    In Soviet Russia, status updates you!
  • by xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) on Tuesday April 22, 2014 @10:55AM (#46815121)

    >> He appeared to announce his resignation from the company on April 1st, but later claimed that it was an April Fools' joke, and that he would remain onboard. In a statement issued Monday, however, VK said that Durov submitted a resignation letter on March 21st and never withdrew it within the mandatory one-month window. Because of that, Durov said, he will be "automatically relieved" of his position.

    Politically, it's bad, but I do enjoy seeing someone's stupid April Fools stunt blow up in their face.

    • That's what you take away from the article *blink*
    • Hah, high time for him to apply to have his name changed from "Durov" to "Durakov". ;-)
    • by js3 (319268)

      >> He appeared to announce his resignation from the company on April 1st, but later claimed that it was an April Fools' joke, and that he would remain onboard. In a statement issued Monday, however, VK said that Durov submitted a resignation letter on March 21st and never withdrew it within the mandatory one-month window. Because of that, Durov said, he will be "automatically relieved" of his position.

      Politically, it's bad, but I do enjoy seeing someone's stupid April Fools stunt blow up in their face.

      Wow he's a total idiot. April fools joke means saying it not doing it.

  • Next time Putin is taking questions on Russian TV this guy should submit one about "blah, blah, blah" so Putin can respond with his own "blah, blah, blah...next question?". Seems to work for other people.
  • by nimbius (983462) on Tuesday April 22, 2014 @11:20AM (#46815353) Homepage
    Here in america we certainly dont have anything this ridiculous. Our social networks take careful steps to ensure profits are privatized and personal information is harvested and transmitted to the government quietly and quickly without so much as raising the issue for reasonable discussion. Our media outlets would never consistently report on the legality or morality of such normal operations as theyre both patriotic and in the interest of the people of the united states. Our elected leaders would never pressure private companies to shut down websites and deny financial remuneration for wholesome and informative whistleblower agencies such as wikileaks. For the Russian government to even consider a takeover of a private corporation is bombastic. We've never once taken over an auto industry or a bank, for example. And as for conventional media in america, we have never delivered talking points and restricted journalists in an attempt to control the dissemenation of information.
  • So, does anyone have any ideas where Edward Snowden might be working in Russia these days?

  • Isn't Facebook basically under defacto control of the NSA anyway.

  • by T.E.D. (34228) on Tuesday April 22, 2014 @01:48PM (#46816687)

    That's just how things work in Russia. There's not really any Rule of Law there. So once a company gets lucrative, the government swoops in and takes it over. Any unfortunate owner who tries to stand in the way finds himself in jail [wikipedia.org], or worse [wikipedia.org].

    What I don't understand is why anyone would invest a single dime of their own money in a business operating in a country where the instant an investment starts paying off, someone else will come reap all your rewards. It just makes no sense whatsoever to try to do business there.

    • by ckedge (192996)

      > What I don't understand is why anyone would invest a single dime of their own money in a business operating in a country where the instant an investment starts paying off, someone else will come reap all your rewards.

      They don't. Not any more, not to the same extent. Russia actually took a significant economic hit when the investment money slowly evaporated over the past 10 years, but it's hidden by the rise in the price of oil and gas (at least gas in Europe, still, so far..).

  • This Pavel Durov guy sent a resignation letter on April 1 saying that he resigned. Then a follow-up letter on April 3 stating that this was an April Fools joke and he'd like to recall the resignation letter.
    Now, the VK social is undergoing hostile takeover and there's lots of going on that we don't know about.
    What most don't seem to understand is:
    You don't make such kind of jokes on April 1st without expecting consequences.
    Imagine if
    * Your boss joked "you're fired, pack your shit" and gave you a pink slip o

  • In Russia, the government controls corporations. In USA, corporations control the government.
  • The Russian state demanded that VK release info on (Ukrainian) users who used VK to organize Euromaidan protests. Durov told them to go fuck themselves.

    Now not only he's fired, but he left Russia, and he went on record saying that he has no intent of returning. Can't blame him. I had to go there on a two-week business trip, and I always had that nagging thought of shit hitting the fan while I'm on the wrong side of the border (since I'm still a Russian citizen, it would probably result in me ending up as a

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