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VC Likens Google Bus Backlash To Nazi Rampage 683

Posted by timothy
from the naw-it's-more-maoist-or-khmer-rouge dept.
theodp writes "Valleywag reports on legendary Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tom Perkins' WSJ op-ed on class tensions, in which the KPCB founder and former HP and News Corp. board member likens criticism of the techno-affluent and their transformation of San Francisco to one of the most horrific events in Western history. 'I would call attention to the parallels of Nazi Germany to its war on its "one percent," namely its Jews, to the progressive war on the American one percent, namely the "rich,"' Perkins writes. 'There is outraged public reaction to the Google buses carrying technology workers from the city to the peninsula high-tech companies which employ them. We have outrage over the rising real-estate prices which these "techno geeks" can pay...This is a very dangerous drift in our American thinking. Kristallnacht was unthinkable in 1930; is its descendent 'progressive' radicalism unthinkable now?"'"
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VC Likens Google Bus Backlash To Nazi Rampage

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  • Pathetic (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gweihir (88907) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:30AM (#46072183)

    People like that will use any "argument" to justify what they are doing, no matter how remote or unrelated. They will not care whether they cheapen other things that have happened. The only goal is to pull the discussion on an emotional level, because they know the facts are not on their side...

    • Re:Pathetic (Score:5, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@NOspAm.world3.net> on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:37AM (#46072215) Homepage

      A better comparison would have been the French revolution. A corrupt overclass that has little regard for the suffering happening beneath them, and actively working against the common good for their own benefit. Of course, that might not have supported his point so well since those guys mostly ended up at the guillotine.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by c0lo (1497653)

        A better comparison would have been the French revolution. A corrupt overclass that has little regard for the suffering happening beneath them, and actively working against the common good for their own benefit. Of course, that might not have supported his point so well since those guys mostly ended up at the guillotine.

        I fail to see how this would be a better comparison, would you be so kind to enlighten me?
        Specifically, how are the "technology workers" a "corrupt overclass"? Again, how come working for Google is "working against the common good"?
        A bit more: is "working for their own benefit" imoral now? ('cause illegal is not)
        Like... what?... they don't pay for their groceries enough/at all? Or are they able to avoid sale taxes on those groceries?

        • Oy (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:19AM (#46072469)

          Taking this a bit personally, are we?

          For one, the protestors are just going after an easy target - the employees of the companies that were using the public bus stops as their own private stops. If those protestors could, I'm sure they'd rather go after Perkins and his buddies.

          These protests are just a symptom of the anger the lower classes at the fact their real incomes and standard of living is declining while being told that they're too stupid to work in the well paying fields while people like the op-ed author are actively lobbying to bring in people overseas that are really no better than they are. (Please, I''ve personally had to train H1-Bs on what a pointer was and what memory locations are. Don't give me this BS that they are smarter or better trained than we are.)

          We have an upper class that is trying to turn our education system into a jobs training program for their exploitation. Our education system is for having an educated electorate and not about creating worker drones. Our kids should be learning reading, writing, math, science:chem,phys, biology, critical thinking skills - NOT how to be a code monkey; which is all high school level CS classes teach.

          In short, these corrupt people are trying to force THEIR training expenses onto the public while PROFITING off of the potential results.

          We DO NOT need more programmer we NEED more people who can think and communicate. And with this World getting more and more integrated, our kids need to learn foreign languages MUCH more than a computer language that will go out of style in a few years.

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by sandertje (1748324)
            Well, I think your kind of people are exactly the problem. Companies have been screaming for years that education does not align with the work field. It's all very nice for the student to learn how to write beautiful academic essays and what not, but that's all bullshit to companies. They just want people that know how to do X - without having to entirely re-educate these people. I think the western world has been living far too much in the "oh, i can do everything I want, and still be rich"-fantasy world.
            • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:10AM (#46072779)

              When you train and educate for current technology and current needs of business, they will be unqualified when things change.

              Companies' needs are for the short term. Technology, business and the markets change very quickly and if we train people to be one trick ponies they will have to be retrained again anyway.

              And we're not talking about ancient Babylonian or Greek here - we're talking about reading, writing, math, basic science and critical thinking here - as well as civics; which I think has been completely forgotten by everyone. Those are basic things and more important than the programming language du jour; which after going out of style, those people will be unemployable - even if they do retrain inanother language du jour - because they have no on the job experience and the companies will just go and hire some CHEAP new grads who were trained in the language/tech du jour.. The system is gamed to screw the people and enrich the rich even more.

              If a company needs a worker they SHOULD train that person to do the job that THEY need. TO demand that my taxes go to pay for vocational training for some high tech company that off shores their profit so that they don't have to pay taxes is a complete ripp-off.

              These companies want it all their way: the public pays for their worker training while they keep all the profits and pay little or no taxes. [forbes.com]

              Google and the rest of Silicon Valley is actually harming our country. They are importing poor people to work for less, not paying taxes, ripping off the system, and all the while keeping the money for themselves.

              • by russotto (537200)

                When you train and educate for current technology and current needs of business, they will be unqualified when things change.

                Google isn't looking for people who know "current technology" or the current needs of business. Google is looking for (at least in the software engineering role) intelligent people who know the fundamentals of computer science and software and system design. Nobody's going to ask questions in a Google interview about esoterica of Mapreduce or Bigtable or even Go.

                (In case it isn't ob

            • Re:Oy (Score:5, Insightful)

              by RedSteve (690399) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:36AM (#46072929)

              What you are describing is training.

              training is not Education.

              Education makes it easier to train someone, but training is not - and should not be - the sole point of Education.

              • Re:Oy (Score:5, Insightful)

                by thej1nx (763573) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @11:48AM (#46073379)
                Completely agree with you on this. However, that does not explains why higher education is so expensive in USA. What is the government doing to fix that? The few American folks that do manage to get higher education are indeed usually much superior in knowledge and skills than most of the H1B hires, but why are there not more of them? Why is state funding for education being reduced, while military funding is way more that America actually needs and keeps increasing actually, if not just staying stable. In effect, why should you need to get yourself neck-deep in debt for years what should actually be subsidized by a government that has its priorities wrong for decades?
            • Re:Oy (Score:5, Interesting)

              by whoever57 (658626) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @12:50PM (#46073845) Journal

              Well, I think your kind of people are exactly the problem. Companies have been screaming for years that education does not align with the work field. .....The Germans have found an elegant solution to this problem, ....The company pays all the bills (the student even gets paid)

              I think that you described what needs to change. Companies are not doing their part in creating an educated workforce. Instead of companies screaming that the education system isn't turning out the job-trained people they need, companies should pay to train the people they need .

              And then there are the unpaid internships, but let's not go there ......

          • Re:Oy (Score:5, Insightful)

            by JWW (79176) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:05AM (#46072731)

            is for having an educated electorate and not about creating worker drones.

            You really really need to look at the history of public education. What you're stating is more like what existed before the 20th century. Government based public education was built by the industrialists specifically to train workers.

            Its very well documented.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P... [wikipedia.org]
            http://www.stgeorgeutah.com/ne... [stgeorgeutah.com]

            • Re:Oy (Score:5, Funny)

              by Luckyo (1726890) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @11:30AM (#46073231)

              You're forgetting something - the attitudes of industrialists in that time. They viewed their workers as their proteges, someone to educate to proper ethics, morals and so on.

              Did you know that Ford, for example, required his workers to adhere to a very strict moral code, down to having inspectors whose sole job was to visit families of workers to ensure that they were living a moral life?

              Education was built by the same people. So while it took job training as a part of it, much of it was about that particular form of patriotism.

              Nowadays elite's ethical code is completely demolished and slaved to pure (self) destructive egoism.

          • Re: Oy (Score:3, Insightful)

            by kittylu (705146)
            The stated issue and victim of obfuscation in this argument is that Google as a private company has been (knowingly) violating the law by using public bus stops in transporting employees without formal permission, let alone any discussion of compensation and guidelines to offset disruption of the public. Secondarily, the city of San Francisco was essentially letting Google get away with doing so until they could no longer ignore the outcry over the situation. Transportation is highly regulated, and Google h
        • Re:Pathetic (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Bob9113 (14996) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:37AM (#46072539) Homepage

          Specifically, how are the "technology workers" a "corrupt overclass"? Again, how come working for Google is "working against the common good"?

          I believe the poster is talking about Perkins and the other 0.01%ers, not the 10%ers that ride the Google Bus. Perkins is disingenuously attempting to draw the technology workers onto his side by calling them 1%ers, but the reality is that very few of them are, or ever will be. The misdirected attacks by the uninformed lower class against the buses are a symptom of a very real problem that Perkins and his peers are creating (I actually believe their intentions are good for the most part, but exceedingly misinformed). Perkins is hoping to get some of the members of the labor class whose wages he and his peers have been intentionally, consciously, premeditatedly suppressing to join his side in the fight as a result of the misdirected but justified anger by the poor.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          Google is like Microsoft now. They can do whatever they want. Nobody wants Windows 8. But Microsoft sells a lot of Windows 8 licenses, because that's what PCs come with. People don't have any choice.

          While it is an interesting technology with cool potential, a lot of folks don't want to be constantly filmed by Google Glass wearers for privacy issues. Like, the thought that all that Google Glass data will belong to the NSA on a whim of a secret court judge. Google doesn't give a rat's ass about people'

      • Re:Pathetic (Score:5, Funny)

        by shikaisi (1816846) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:11AM (#46072427)

        A better comparison would have been the French revolution.

        "Let them eat Apples"

      • Re:Pathetic (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:17AM (#46072455)

        A better comparison would have been the French revolution

        No. Just no.

        Come on people, this is not the government trying to take action against a group it doesn't like. These "bus riders" are in danger of being rounded up and put in prison, put in camps, or put to death.

        If we as a society can't deal with the fact that a company provides transportation for its employees as a perk then we are a lost cause. These "bus riders" are probably all working while in the bus. Less traffic for everyone, less stress for the employees and more productivity for the company.

        These "bus riders" are not forced to ride the bus, and are not in danger of being burned at the stake or facing a guillotine, or being shoved into ovens or gas chambers.

        Just get a fucking grip. Your hyperbole is utterly wrong and ridiculous!

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by ganjadude (952775)
          correction. They are not in danger of the government doing that to them. They are in danger by their own neighbors doing it. The original point comparing it to the treatment of the jews in germany, while hyperbole, is more apt
        • Re:Pathetic (Score:4, Insightful)

          by runeghost (2509522) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @12:48PM (#46073819)

          What you're missing is that these private buses are using public stops. It's a very minor thing, yes. But it's also a perfect symbol of what's been happening in America: Private companies enrich a tiny fraction of the population, while moving as much of the costs of their personal enrichment onto the public, often damaging the public interest in some way or another while enriching themselves.

          Again, this is not a big deal in the grand scheme of things, and in a country that did not have levels of wealth inequality comparably to Imperial Rome it would never be an issue. But it represents the problems of 21st Century America so perfectly, I'm not surprised it has ignited something of a firestorm.

          • Re:Pathetic (Score:4, Insightful)

            by ApplePy (2703131) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @06:23PM (#46076059)

            What you're missing is that these private buses are using public stops. It's a very minor thing, yes. But it's also a perfect symbol of what's been happening in America:

            Or, it may simply be that existing places where public buses stop to load and disgorge passengers -- happen to be someone's crazy idea of good places for private buses to do the same.

            I've seen places where bus stops have a pullout area so as to be out of a traffic lane while stopped. Don't know if that applies here, but think about it... what sense would it make to deliberately stop somewhere other than a bus stop, for the express purpose of avoiding bus stops?

            If you think the private companies should put in their own bus stops, grand. But they can't just go out and tear up streets without permission from city and/or state governments, which may or may not ever accomplish anything anyway.

            We put up public infrastructure for people to use. I'm reasonably certain we can't discriminate against people with too much money.

  • Godwin's law (Score:5, Insightful)

    by maxwell demon (590494) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:31AM (#46072189) Journal

    Maybe someone should have told him about Godwin's law.

    By invoking a Nazi comparison, he already lost.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:40AM (#46072235)

      Godwin's Law states: "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1" It doesn't mean you automatically lose a debate, it just means that Hitler/Nazis will inevitably get dragged into the conversation.

      • by Shimbo (100005) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:57AM (#46072331)

        It doesn't mean you automatically lose a debate

        Not as originally stated, although that is often assumed to follow. For example, the Jargon file has:

        “As a Usenet discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one.” There is a tradition in many groups that, once this occurs, that thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress.

      • by maxwell demon (590494) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:00AM (#46072347) Journal

        From Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] (emphasis by me):

        "For example, there is a tradition in many newsgroups and other Internet discussion forums that once such a comparison is made, the thread is finished and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever debate was in progress.[7] This principle is itself frequently referred to as Godwin's law."

        That's what I've known as Godwin's law since I've first heard the term, and this is how I used it above.

    • Re:Godwin's law (Score:4, Insightful)

      by dfenstrate (202098) <dfenstrate@gmail ... minus herbivore> on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:14AM (#46072805)
      The fascist actions of the Government lately cannot have escaped your notice. In case they have, I'll paste a summary for you:

      Coincidence: Hollywood’s only conservative group is getting close IRS nonprofit scrutiny

      Another Coincidence: James O’Keefe Group Being Audited by NY. Again.

      Yet Another Coincidence: Dinesh D’Souza Indicted For Election Fraud

      Still Another Coincidence: IRS Proposes New 501(c)(4) Rules That Just Happen to Cover Most Tea Party Groups

      Judge Strikes Down Wisconsin’s ‘John Doe’ Subpoenas

      Secret investigations targeted coincidentally at most prominent conservative groups in WI who can only now legally talk about their harassment. If you want to see what American fascism would look like, well this is it.

      quote source: Here, with more links. [ace.mu.nu]

      The power of the federal goverment, and some state governments, is being turned against those who oppose the powerful. If you don't have a problem with that, you're no better than a Nazi, regardless of Godwin's law.

  • by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:33AM (#46072197) Homepage Journal

    What actually led to the third reich's rise to power? Economic imbalance.

    What actually fueled the war? Economic benefit to the very richest people. You can't make war without materials. They didn't have all the materials they needed, and they were able to buy them from other countries. The US government knew that an american was making fuel sales to the reich, but permitted them to continue for quite some time, then later seized the profits. Mitsubishi Zeroes were made out of ALCOA aluminum.

    What's leading to any possible progrom-like activity against the rich? The actions of the rich.

    Can't feel sorry for the wealthy. Share your wealth with us, or we will share our poverty with you. Signed, the world.

    P.S. If you have a job, a roof over your head, and lighting and refrigeration, you are a member of the eight percent.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by amiga3D (567632)

      At first I thought he was an idiot.....but after reading that rant I can't help but think he might have a point.

    • by NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:08AM (#46072409)
      Here's a shocking stat I came across just yesterday: the richest 85 PEOPLE have as much wealth as the bottom HALF the world population. That's 85 == 3.5 BILLION. citation [oxfam.org][PDF warning]

      Almost HALF of the world's wealth is owned by one percent of the population.

      In the US, the wealthiest one percent captured 95 percent of post-financial crisis growth since 2009, while the bottom 90 percent became poorer.

      Unfortunately, I have somewhere to be, or I'd be writing a much longer epistle.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by _Sharp'r_ (649297)

        My 9 year old daughter is debt free, but doesn't really have any income. That places her as wealthier than 2 BILLION people (with negative net worth) using your methodology!

        There are "lies, damn lies, and statistics." Your use of statistics falls into that category.

        It doesn't matter how wealthy people are compared to each other, unless your overwhelming consideration is jealousy. It matters how wealthy people are compared to how wealthy they used to be.

        Also "the bottom 90 percent became poorer" is an inaccu

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        "Income inequality" is a fraudulent, rhetorical device, a red herring. The correct measurement, from a scientific point of view, is outcomes analysis in the average person's changes in health, longevity, and wealth, the loaves of bread and tvs on their shelves.

        If you include China, India, and most of the former eastern bloc countries, the average quality of life is skyrocketting. Because of freedom-based capitalism. Your class warfare rhetoric has had its day and been found murduringly lacking in compari

  • Uh right. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sg_oneill (159032) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:34AM (#46072201)

    Theres a big difference between the Nazis arguments on the Jews and the OWS argument on the 1%.

    The OWS believe the ultra rich are ultra rich because they are ultra rich

    The nazis thought the jews where ultra rich because the nazis where racist fanatics.

    Kind of a difference.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by wisnoskij (1206448)

      I am pretty sure the Nazis thought the Jews were rich, because they were rich. They hated them and thought they were trying to take over the world because they were bat-shit crazy, and needed someone to blame for all their problems.

      • Re:Uh right. (Score:4, Informative)

        by ddtstudio (61065) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:16AM (#46072815)

        Citation, please. Snark aside, I'm not sure why you are "pretty sure" of this.

        There were rich and high-profile Jews, to be sure. As there were rich and high-profile Christians, Austrians, etc., at the time. But if you even took a few seconds to look up what Kristallnacht was, you'd realize that the thousands and thousands of Jewish businesses that were targeted were shops: small commercial places such as storefront butchers, shoemakers, bookstores, etc. Just in that, you'd realize that these people who were hauled away, often to death camps, were not the 1%, but working class.

        Hey, I'm not just irritated at your "pretty sure" statement because this happened to my own family members. Go look things up before you make a public statement. Don't be a Perkins.

    • Theres a big difference between the Nazis arguments on the Jews and the OWS argument on the 1%.

      The OWS believe the ultra rich are ultra rich because they are ultra rich

      The nazis thought the jews where ultra rich because the nazis where racist fanatics.

      Kind of a difference.

      OWS thinks that the rich get that way by cheating or stealing from ordinary people.

      The Nazis believed that the Jews got rich by cheating [ushmm.org] or stealing from ordinary people (Germans in that case).

      The Nazis drew inspiration from Marx. OWS draws inspiration from Marx.

      "The classes and the races, too weak to master the new conditions of life, must give way.” - Karl Marx

    • by MtViewGuy (197597)

      Except for one thing: does the OWS crowd understand what happens when Socialism--the aim of many OWS supporters--runs amok? Ask the elderly survivors of the former Soviet Union under Stalin and China under Mao what happened--unfettered mass shootings, labor camps, forced exile and deliberate famine that may have killed (by scholarly estimates) at minimum 100 million people, with some estimates as high as 150 million people. In short, 10 to 15 times what the Nazis achieved between 1933 and 1945.

      Now you know

  • Wild exaggeration (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Coward Anonymous (110649) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:36AM (#46072213)

    The comparison is inappropriate.

    At the same time, I do understand the disgust with the neo-luddites of SF and their alarming witch hunt - it is a mob.

  • Never was so much owed by so many to so few bankers.

  • Brazil (Score:4, Interesting)

    by sobolwolf (1084585) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:44AM (#46072251) Journal
    I have lived in Brazil for quite some years now. Here the gap between rich and everyone else (there is no middle class here so to speak) is to such an extent that if you have money you are a target. This means that you must live in a gated community in constant fear that you or your kids might be kidnapped. You need to own a cheapo car so you won't stand out too much when driving around. Of course you will have a nice car too, but this is only for weekends or maybe travel to places where other rich people go. In the end it is easy to become a prisoner of that wealth that is supposed to make you more free. I would prefer to live middle class in a 1st world country than rich in Brazil. The sad thing is that the erosion of the middle class in the 1st world countries means that they soon might resemble Brazil, and this is not good, even if you are rich.
    • Re:Brazil (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mean pun (717227) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:09AM (#46072419)

      The sad thing is that the erosion of the middle class in the 1st world countries means that they soon might resemble Brazil, and this is not good, even if you are rich.

      Which is exactly why it is so shortsighted to cut on welfare programs and generally treat the poor as the enemy, as is the trend in the US and many european countries nowadays. When the poor start to starve, they will not die quietly, they will get violent. Keeping the masses reasonably well off is a good investment, even for the most psychopathic rich.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by phmadore (1391487)
        I think a scientific study might show that welfare, truly, solves poverty in the same way that arsenic solves cancer. We have to deepen our understanding of the problem. Instead of welfare, give people a nice, clean place to live and a guarantee that they will have food in their refrigerator and an economy which will produce a job for them if they are willing to become equipped to do a job. The very small number of CHARITIES which do things along these lines that I have seen have stunning results in compari
        • Re:Brazil (Score:5, Insightful)

          by iluvcapra (782887) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:32AM (#46072909)

          I think a scientific study might show that welfare, truly, solves poverty in the same way that arsenic solves cancer.

          Arsenic is an effective treatment for leukemia [alphamedpress.org].

          Empirical econometric studies of direct government transfers, "welfare," are generally favorable, at least compared to other popular alternatives, such as "nothing." Critics generally don't attack welfare with "scientific evidence," they attack it on moral and anecdotal grounds.

        • Replacing entitlements with charities is exactly the wrong thing to do. The fact that a person meeting certain criteria is -entitled- to assistance is almost as important as the assistance itself.

          There is a psychological element to this, and whether someone feels entitled to assistance or needs to go on bended knee to -ask- is a pretty big deal.

          Studies supporting this have been posted to Slashdot in the past, but I have to start a 5 hour drive and don't have time to google for you. Relative income vs Abso

  • perspective? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by inode_buddha (576844) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:47AM (#46072263) Journal

    Somehow I think that actual holocaust survivors would be insulted by this comparison. Also I think the yahoo has lost all sense of perspective and proportion.

    I think what angers everyone else is that "the rich" are playing by a different set of rules. Fix that and you'll fix most everything else.

  • You are rendered irrelevant.

  • One Percent (Score:4, Insightful)

    by oldhack (1037484) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:57AM (#46072329)

    First of all, I'm sure Google/Apple/etc. get to pull some of the cream of the crop, but these guys still don't make the kind of money the Wall St. Assholes make - they are hardly One-percenters.

    The dude is truly out of touch with the rest of society.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @08:59AM (#46072339)

    1. The Holocaust

    I also have a list of things that are like slavery if anyone is interested.

  • by mrsam (12205) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:00AM (#46072349) Homepage

    I do agree that the "99% versus the 1%" movement in American politics has some striking historical parallels. However, I don't think that Nazi Germany is the best comparison. A more appropriate historical equivalent would be the Bolshevik/Communist movement that culminated in the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolshevik_Revolution).

    The contemporary rhetoric from the left wing of America politics: i.e. "the 1%", "make the rich pay their fair share", etc... Is nearly word-for-word the same rhetoric heard on the streets of Russia, adjusted for a century's worth of elapsed history, urging the "proletariat", the working people to rally against the "bourgeoisie", i.e. the rich, and the "kulaks", the ultra-rich. Led by the Bolshevik movement, it culminated in the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. The word "Bolshevik" is directly translated as "ones belong to the majority". In other words, "the 99%". All the great unwashed I saw on the boob tube at various "Occupy " events, in the last couple of years, are the sons and daughters of the Bolsheviks a century ago. Whether they realize it, or not.

    • by PvtVoid (1252388) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:03AM (#46072719)
      People riding the Google Bus [glassdoor.com] are not the one percent. Hell, most likely not even the top five percent [wikipedia.org]

      Why the fuck anybody would have a problem with companies providing middle-class workers with traffic-reducing, environmentally friendly transport to work us utterly beyond me. But, oh please, successful people: lay off the victimhood schtick. It's silly and unbecoming.
      • by gnoshi (314933)

        One possible reason (and I'm not in SF so this really is just speculation) is that it is seen as Google using its money to buy its way out of the limitations imposed on the rest of the community - in this case, in transport - rather than contributing to resolving the underlying problem of inadequate general public transport.
        Whether that is a fair perspective or not is another matter, but that is a possible reason.

    • by Trepidity (597) <(gro.hsikcah) (ta) (todhsals-muiriled)> on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:23AM (#46072855)

      The word "Bolshevik" is directly translated as "ones belong to the majority". In other words, "the 99%".

      You might want to check a history book? The word doesn't have anything to do with "the 99%" or population groups at all. The Bolshevik, or "majority" faction was a split with the Menshevik, or "minority" faction within the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party primarily over issues of tactics. Both sides of the split were Marxists. You have probably also heard of some Mensheviks, such as Leon Trotsky.

  • by GrumpySteen (1250194) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:05AM (#46072387)

    It's not war until weapons come out and people start dying.

  • you know, kristallnacht was bad, but the u.s. had its own pogroms during world war I against Germans in America. German businesses were smashed up, German printing presses were destroyed by mobs, etc.

    http://historymatters.gmu.edu/... [gmu.edu]

  • bah (Score:4, Interesting)

    by skipkent (1510) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:13AM (#46072443)

    at a time when income disparity is at an all-time high in about the last 100 years. tom perkins is worried about some future backlash against the rich, while the political system has already sold out most of the public if anything does happen, when push comes to shove, he'll be able to take his money with him to singapore or hong kong like the russian oligarchs took theirs to london.

    lol, he's written books
    http://www.amazon.com/Sex-Sing... [amazon.com]
    how self-absorbed do you have to be to write this?

  • by Karmashock (2415832) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:18AM (#46072459)

    These people are dangerous radicals if not in action then in concept. Their way of thinking... entitlement... and presumptions are dangerous.

    We have people in SF that feel they're entitled to stop traffic to promote bicycles with some frequency. We have people that feel they're entitled to pour sugar in the tanks of industrial machinery for pretty much any construction project.

    There is a strain of radical leftism in the SF area that really needs to get its public respect pulled. I am not saying pass a law. I am not saying persecute these people with government power. Rather, I am saying that they depend on a basic level on our acceptance of their behavior and we don't have to accept it.

    Their actions are not respectable. It really should stop. Stop granting them respect for their behavior. Its unacceptable.

    • by Nyder (754090)

      These people are dangerous radicals if not in action then in concept. Their way of thinking... entitlement... and presumptions are dangerous.

      We have people in SF that feel they're entitled to stop traffic to promote bicycles with some frequency. We have people that feel they're entitled to pour sugar in the tanks of industrial machinery for pretty much any construction project.

      There is a strain of radical leftism in the SF area that really needs to get its public respect pulled. I am not saying pass a law. I am not saying persecute these people with government power. Rather, I am saying that they depend on a basic level on our acceptance of their behavior and we don't have to accept it.

      Their actions are not respectable. It really should stop. Stop granting them respect for their behavior. Its unacceptable.

      I don't agree. They are protesting what they think is unfair. How do you protest stuff you think is unfair, bitch about it on forums?

      • Protesting is fine. Obstructing is not.

        Its the difference between saying you disagree and getting in my way to stop me. It is the difference between holding a sign up and slashing my tires.

        I have no problem with protesting. Protesting is fine.

        My problem is with their belief that they can do more then protest.

        They have rights... I agree. They have a right to protest.

        I have a right to ignore them. That is my right. My right to not agree with them. They want to promote bicycles for example. I don't agree. I wa

  • Holy shit! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:19AM (#46072471)

    I'm Jewish, and even I, or actually exactly because of that, am appalled!

    What happened in the 3rd Reich was a low point in human history. Maybe _the_ lowest point, in that all semblance of humanity and compassion were foregone.

    What's going on in California is class warfare with some misguided tactics. I can't blame the residents of the neighborhoods that fear from gentrification, even though I may (or may not, I can't really say for sure, as I don't have a better idea, to be honest) or may not have used their tactics.

  • Today's capitalists are so all-consumed with greed that it's hard to imagine somebody like Henry Ford actually raising wages to his workers could buy mor stuff. Mister Super-Genius Tom Perkins probably can't even imagine an act like that, or imagine reducing the national workweek to 36 hours to force employers to broaden income distribution, which is really how the Great Depression was fixed (48-hour workweek reduced to 40).

    Cry me a river when the government takes your obscene wealth away, Tom.

    • by khallow (566160)

      that it's hard to imagine somebody like Henry Ford actually raising wages to his workers could buy mor stuff.

      Ever wonder why society got to the state where shortsightedness is so amply rewarded? It's real simple. Get rid of the risk, which is what has been done on multiple levels, from welfare (both of the personal and corporate sort) through to Keynesian-style economics and publicly funded R&D, and you get rid of the incentive to think long term.

  • From A Working Man (Score:3, Interesting)

    by phmadore (1391487) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @09:49AM (#46072617) Homepage Journal
    Look, I've been, in one way or another, poor for most of my life. I have had money at various points and lost it doing stupid things. I intend to have money again now that I have a family. I believe that anyone with enough grit can make it. My wife and myself, we were both homeless travelling hippies when we met. In fact, she recently wrote a short blog [crunchymama.us] about this. We wouldn't have gotten off the street without some help from others, so I doubt we'll ever be as ungrateful as the typical wealthy are. I do not consider the rank and file at Apple, Google, or any other major tech firm to be wealthy, ruling class, or rich. These same progressives who are bitching about their perceived affluence would also shit their pants if these tech companies were to pay them wages comparable to the folks protesting. The more a company makes, the more a society makes, the more its lowest level members should make. That is the way capitalists have always said it should be, and it's really only when they pervert their own notion by giving CEOs 500 to 10,000% of what they pay their janitors that the corruption and bad decision-making begin to take place. Society rewards hard work but it too often rewards asskissing and outright lying, as well. Just my thoughts. I know my family will be fine no matter what; I always seem to figure something out. Still getting on our feet, now, but I'm willing to bet my income will be 300-450% of what it was last year. It takes faith, it takes grit. If I hadn't done it before, though, I don't think I'd feel equipped to do it now, so I recommend anyone who really wants to change their life to take a business class or something along those lines, because you will truly never break the economic chains as long as you have a boss profiting enjoying the fruits of your labor.
  • by TarPitt (217247) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @10:38AM (#46072941)

    If you think there is something wrong with historically unprecedented income and wealth inequality, if you fear for the future of democracy when 85 individuals control more wealth than 3.5 billion people [latimes.com], if you are alarmed at the influence of this wealth on politics (to the point where a single individual can bankroll an entire presidential campaign [slashdot.org], then you are a Nazi.

    No further discussion necessary.

    A few individuals have vandalized buses, therefore an entire subject is off limits.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by stenvar (2789879)

      If you think there is something wrong with historically unprecedented income and wealth inequality, if you fear for the future of democracy when 85 individuals control more wealth than 3.5 billion people [latimes.com],

      You are one of that select group of people who control more wealth than 3 billion people, because half the world has no wealth at all. Don't you feel evil yet?

      And do you know how that distribution has been historically? Of course not.

      If you're doing anything tech related in the US, there's a

      • by Guy Harris (3803) <guy@alum.mit.edu> on Sunday January 26, 2014 @04:37PM (#46075383)

        No further discussion necessary.

        Well, obviously not with you! You have already made up your mind and won't let facts get in the way of your ideology or your bigotry.

        When the poster you're quoting says "No further discussion necessary", he's saying that this is what Perkins is implying, i.e. "hey, this protest is just like Kristallnacht, hence evil and unworthy of discussion". Read the posting, and its title ("He's trying to shut down debate", "he" being Perkins) more carefully.

  • by prefec2 (875483) on Sunday January 26, 2014 @11:36AM (#46073283)

    The Jews in Germany were killed because they belonged to a specific group of people who had a reference to Jewish religion. All the accusations against them were wrong and just used to form a common enemy. This especially is true for the Reichsprogromnacht (Kristallnacht is Nazi vocabulary).

    The attacks on Google employees is wrong, but they are triggered by a real impact these people have. Due to their high income they can pay more for houses, which triggers an increase in house prices. Therefore, other people are pushed out of the same area. The term for this is gentrification. This results in pressure on poorer people. So they get angry. A result of the gentrification in SF is also that the Google-people are destroying the very environment they want to join. Similar things happened in Germany's capital Berlin where the Prenzlauer Berg was former a by artists and other creative but poor people inhabited district, but is now occupied by richer "hip" people. There are also such conflicts in Hamburg.

    The problem is a class based discrimination through money power. With the widening gap between low and middle/high class income, these problems increase. Cities have to cope with this by limiting the potential to squeeze out poor peoples of districts. The big money bubble presently floating around the world is also steering up house prices causing gentrification resulting in more violence in the end.

    • by bkmoore (1910118)
      Best post of the day on this topic... When rents go up, people's incomes down, especially those living on a fixed income. Most people on the driving side of the market don't know what it's like to be on the wrong side of the deal. So when people have their lives uprooted and are forced from their homes, they chalk it up to class envy or some other overly simplistic assumptions to make them feel better about themselves.

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