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United States Politics

Is Daylight Saving Time Worth Saving? 646

Posted by Soulskill
from the either-that-or-it's-not dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "In politics, health, and academia, there are plenty of detractors that say daylight saving might not be worth saving. One vocal opponent is Missouri State Representative Delus Johnson, who wants to end the watch and clock switchery altogether. In short, he says we should spring forward this one last time, without ever falling back. He wants Missouri – and other states willing to join a pact – to permanently adopt daylight saving time and call it Standard Time. He's sure that it'll increase economic development in the later part of the year; giving people a little more daylight to do their Black Friday shopping. Matthew J. Kotchen and Laura E. Grant at the National Bureau of Economic Research have argued that DST has had adverse effects on energy spending. They calculate some extra $10-16 million spent by Indiana due to time changes. Their research concluded it's probably a much bigger loss in other states. A year ago, Motherboard's Kelly Bourdet reported on a health study that concluded DST might actually kill you. Chances of heart-attack were stated to increase by 10 percent on the days following the spring change, and to decrease by 10% after gaining the hour in the fall." There's even a We The People petition about it.
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Is Daylight Saving Time Worth Saving?

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  • by jimbolauski (882977) on Friday March 08, 2013 @03:57PM (#43120243) Journal
    Why is it so important to have sunlight in the morning, give me evening sunlight that I can enjoy after work. I don't need sunlight for my morning deuce.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Overzeetop (214511)

      Maybe you should either get to work earlier? Why should the rest of us plan our days around your idiosyncracies - or anyone's for that matter.

      You do know that, effectively, that's what you're doing anyway with DST. Solar physics doesn't actually change.

    • by dpdjvan (2551774)
      You do realize the by moving the clock ahead an hour you would have a percived notion of an extra hour of day after work. This is assuming you don't have flexiable hours.
    • by fustakrakich (1673220) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:16PM (#43120483) Journal

      If we do away with daylight savings, we should shift all the time zones about 7 or 8 degrees farther west longitude. The sun sets too early in the eastern half (near the 'leading edge') of each time zone.

      • by xclr8r (658786) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:31PM (#43120703)
        just move it 30 mins and be done with it.
      • by mill3d (1647417) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:44PM (#43120883)
        Wouldn't that just push the problem further by a few degrees?
    • by SeaFox (739806)

      Why is it so important to have sunlight in the morning, give me evening sunlight that I can enjoy after work. I don't need sunlight for my morning deuce.

      Children walk to school early in the morning. The brighter outside it is, the better parents feel (how much this really impacts safety is debatable).
      School ends long before the sub goes down, so having extra daylight at the end of the day is of less importance.

      • by hedwards (940851)

        You could solve that problem by scheduling school in a more reasonable way without effecting everybody else. Ultimately with only 8 hours or so of light at the winter solstice, the only way to avoid that problem is by centering the school day around noon.

        Bottom line is that it makes more sense to just schedule things properly than to kludge things together.

      • by wavedeform (561378) on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:09PM (#43121215)

        Children walk to school early in the morning..

        Ahh the "think of the children" argument. I live in a relatively safe bedroom community near a major city. There's a grade school around the corner from me. I can say with some certitude that kids don't walk to school these days.

        • I beg to differ, sir. You may have heard the aphorism: The plural of anecdote is not data. You have one data point: kids at your school do not walk to that school. Given the difficulty of proving a negative, I'll even grant you the possibility that you are correct even for hours you have not held the school under observation.

          I, however, have seen kids walking to schools near me, within the last school year.

          Your statement thus cannot be extended universally. The issues of children walking to school in t

      • by pla (258480) on Friday March 08, 2013 @07:41PM (#43122685) Journal
        Children walk to school early in the morning. The brighter outside it is, the better parents feel

        Fuck how parents feel. The kids don't really care.

        And I don't give a damn about the candy industry or the amount of light on Halloween, either. We, as a society, need to move beyond pandering to the whims of these "helicopter" parents turning their "precious and unique snowflakes" into a generation of helpless losers unable to grasp the idea of "don't stand in the road" and "don't get into the van" and "don't believe Mr. Timmons when he says he has a roll of dimes in his pocket for you".

        And if you take this as humor, I feel sorry for you, you've already gone too far over to "their" side.
    • by arobatino (46791) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:23PM (#43120587)

      I remember walking to the school bus stop in the dark when Nixon implemented year-round daylight savings time as a result of the oil embargo. It was just starting to get light by the time the bus arrived. From 1973 oil crisis [wikipedia.org] :

      Year-round daylight saving time was implemented from January 6, 1974, to February 23, 1975. The move spawned significant criticism because it forced many children to commute to school before sunrise. The pre-existing daylight saving rules, calling for the clocks to be advanced one hour on the last Sunday in April, were restored in 1976.

  • NO. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fyngyrz (762201) on Friday March 08, 2013 @03:57PM (#43120245) Homepage Journal

    No! It's a royal pain in the ass. Get rid of it!

    • Re:NO. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mattventura (1408229) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:04PM (#43120327) Homepage
      Lots of things are a pain in the ass. US measurement system, silly date notation systems, IPv4, the two party system, etc. Unfortunately none of those are going anywhere anytime soon.
      • Re:NO. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by pixelpusher220 (529617) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:11PM (#43120415)
        Indeed, but there's literally about zero effort to just not fall back. This is low hanging fruit on the pain-in-the-ass fruit tree.
        • by Obfuscant (592200)

          Indeed, but there's literally about zero effort to just not fall back. This is low hanging fruit on the pain-in-the-ass fruit tree.

          Except for changes to every computer, embedded or otherwise, that would normally "fall back" and thus have the wrong time for half the year, there is zero effort involved. If you have zero responsibility for maintaining anything, yes, there's zero effort.

          It would be somewhat less effort to fall back one more time and then stay there, since it is somewhat easier to set up systems to stay on standard time year-round than to stay on daylight saving time.

    • Re:NO. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Freshly Exhumed (105597) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:06PM (#43120361) Homepage

      UTC with NTP... that's the way to go. Goodbye local time forever!

      • by lart2150 (724284)
        Every time I have to deal with timezones I wish everyone was UTC I know for a lot of people including my self the next day would change part way through the day but it's so annoying to deal with as many time zones as we have today. While we are at it can we fix it so no month has less than 30 days or more then 31?
        • Re:NO. (Score:5, Informative)

          by hawguy (1600213) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:51PM (#43120987)

          Every time I have to deal with timezones I wish everyone was UTC I know for a lot of people including my self the next day would change part way through the day but it's so annoying to deal with as many time zones as we have today. While we are at it can we fix it so no month has less than 30 days or more then 31?

          Things would be worse without timezones since it's not like everyone will go to have a 09:00UTC - 17:00UTC workday, they'll work based on the local solar time (which is why timezones were invented in the first place). So without timezones you'd have to remember "Let's see... it's 14:00 UTC here now and I just got to work, so is my west coast colleague awake yet? Hmm.. let me look up the sunrise. Oh yes, here it is, his local sunrise is at 14:30UTC so he's probably still in bed, I guess I better call him later. I wonder when he'll get off work...hmm...if sunrise is at 14:30, he probably starts work around 16:30, so maybe he'll be home around 01:30UTC.

          Fixing the calendar is hard since (like timezones), years are tied to natural phenomena and 365 is only evenly divisible by 5 and 73. So you could have five 73 day months (plus a leapday), or maybe could go with 13 months of 28 days to give 364 days. Just make the extra 1.25 days a holiday.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by FuzzNugget (2840687)

            How is that any worse than...

            OK, he's in two tone zones over, it's two hours later... or is it earlier? Or is he in one of those places that's only a half hour difference? Or is it an hour and a half? Err, wait, it's one of those places that doesn't do DST, so it's actually three ... no one ... no two and a half... oh, fuck it already, I'll just leave a message.

            No, life would be WAY easier without DST and timezones, where everyone was on UTC. Who cares if the sun sets at 1800 or 0300? It would be a litt

  • by DarthBling (1733038) on Friday March 08, 2013 @03:58PM (#43120249)
    No.
  • Just in time (Score:5, Informative)

    by mwvdlee (775178) on Friday March 08, 2013 @03:58PM (#43120257) Homepage

    This article just in time for the yearly "Should we keep DST? No, but we'll keep it anyway" cycle.

    • by Rob the Bold (788862) on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:16PM (#43121307)

      This article just in time for the yearly "Should we keep DST? No, but we'll keep it anyway" cycle.

      I was starting to get worried that we weren't going to get to have this little twice-a-year bitchfest here on Slashdot this Spring.

      Some traditions are important. They help keep you grounded and define your culture.

  • by MrEricSir (398214) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:00PM (#43120271) Homepage

    There was a time when it was very, very dark at night, and it made sense to adjust the schedule so you could actually see.

    But with electric lighting, it's pretty much never dark in areas where people live and work. The benefit to daylight savings is much less than it was 100 years ago.

    • by jxander (2605655)

      I never understood this argument... turning our clocks back and forth doesn't actually change the amount of sunlight per day. Just moves the hour from morning to evening, and back.

      If you have a job that requires sunlight late in the day, just wake up an hour earlier. Does a farmer get more daylight hours working from 7am - 8pm, as opposed to working 6am - 7pm?

      • by pixelpusher220 (529617) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:20PM (#43120535)
        Since 'most' people work 9-5, significant daylight time after 5pm is a pretty attractive concept. The farmer works outside, so as you say it doesn't matter when it's light to him.

        To the working stiffs, it does because if it's dark in the morning and on the way to work it doesn't affect them, but multiple hours of light after work is very beneficial.
      • by bws111 (1216812)

        Many people seem to enjoy doing things outdoors, in actual sunlight, after they get done with work. So, you say, just go to work an hour earlier. Well that is OK if your employer, customers, etc also agree to that shift. But then the customers also have the same problem with their employers and customers. But since most people are fine with having an extra hour of sunlight during the after work hours most people will agree to it. Now all we have to do is agree on when exactly this shift will happen. H

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      Electric lighting isn't free.

    • Close but not quite. Lighting was one of the most expensive household utilities. Back in the 1700s it cost significant money to make and transport candles everywhere. Today lighting is basically an after thought on the home expense charts.

      That said, it would actually make more sense to leave it at EST rather than DST. On DST we're home earlier in the evening and thus usually will run the AC unit more, increasing energy usage.

      In a future world where a majority of thermostats adjust based on househo
    • But with electric lighting, it's pretty much never dark in areas where people live and work.

      That argument works if you are indoors, but if you are outside gardening, cycling, etc, more hours of post-workday daylight are a real boon. Of course we could also solve the problem by adjusting the clock time start/end of work days or adopting more flex time working, but that seems to be just as controversial.

  • We should also call breakfast lunch, lunch dinner, and dinner breakfast when we do this. As it is, most high schools are so crowded the first lunch period starts as early as 10 AM. With permanent daylight saving time, it will still be dark or just breaking dawn in winter when this time rolls around.
  • Cut all the whiny human 'cry, cry, I'm all worked up about where the abnormally close star is right now' crap and just adopt TAI across the board. Now that is proper time.

  • The summary says that we should 'spring forward' without 'falling back.' However the end of the summary says that 'springing forward' increases risk of heart attack, so wouldn't it be better to wait till we 'fall back?' Picking the wrong one would mean a 2-hour shift (or maybe an overlap) between zones (somewhere over an ocean.)

    • Presumably it's that springing forward makes people late more than falling back, which increases stress, thus the heart attacks. Falling back, likewise, makes people early and reduces stress. However, the effect is only for immediately after a clock change... so it makes no sense to "wait until we fall back". The only way that logic would make sense would be to fall back every year and never spring forward... of course that won't work for obvious reasons.

      Personally, I'm in favor of abolishing time zones alt

  • Missouri (Score:5, Interesting)

    by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:04PM (#43120331) Homepage Journal

    It's nice to see a mention of one of my great state's reps that, for once, doesn't involve them doing/saying something unspeakably stupid...

    Yea, I'm talking about you, Todd Akin [policymic.com] and Rory Ellinger. [ky3.com]

    • I would mod you up if I had points. Agreed, finally something sensible from a Missouri politician that doesn't make us the laughing stock of the country.
    • by geekoid (135745)

      Yes, if you agree clearly it isn't stupid~

      sheesh.

      OTOH, you publicly display how ignorant you are about Capitalism and feudalism in your sig. So I guess I shouldn't be surprised by ignorant people thinking there opinion on the matters is valid.

      • Yes, if you agree clearly it isn't stupid~

        sheesh.

        Never knew you were a Todd Akin fan. What a piece of shit.

        OTOH, you publicly display how ignorant you are about Capitalism and feudalism in your sig.

        Yea, sure thing buddy... 'cause expecting you to have the capacity for critical thought is just going waaay too far...

        So I guess I shouldn't be surprised by ignorant people thinking there opinion on the matters is valid.

        Didn't your mother ever tell you, if you don't have anything constructive to add to the conversation, keep your self-aggrandizing, masturbatory petulance to yourself?

  • Kill it (Score:2, Interesting)

    by onyxruby (118189)

    Kill it dead, bury it in the textbooks of history and let daylight saving stand as a testament of the folly of man that he thought he might outwit mother nature. Incredible amounts of money and aggravation are wasted every year on this leftover from the age of agriculture.

    In a modern world where clocks are set by the atom this archaic throwback to the days of the steam locomotive has gone from quaint to foolish expense. No one will miss it and society has long since moved on with these wonders we call light

    • Re:Kill it (Score:5, Interesting)

      by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland AT yahoo DOT com> on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:22PM (#43120577) Homepage Journal

      I will miss it, as well many people in the north.
      Some things you should probably consider:
      1) No one is trying to trick mother natures, if you think it's about that, then you are fucking stupid and STFU
      2) There is no indicator that, overall, money is wasted
      3) "In a modern world where clocks are set by the atom "
      This underscores how ignorant you small minded you are. It has nothing to dodo the the accuracy of a clock.

      More daylight in the evening is beneficial and enjoyable.

      Yo do know we live on a globe, right? and that northern states are impacted more by the shifting about of daylight? And there aren't a lot of places that get an exact amount of day and night every year? and that not everyone gets to pick there work hours? and people do more outside in the evening then in the morning? People use more electricity for lighting in the evening then they do in the morning?

      Most people get up just in times to shower, eat and then go to work. Not a lot of relaxing hang around tyime. and if there where it would be colder anyways
      Bunch of short sighted morons.

    • Incredible amounts of money and aggravation are wasted every year on this leftover from the age of agriculture.

      Speaks someone who has no idea where their food comes from. Hint: agriculture.

      Here's one simple example: Every morning the cows come in around dawn to be milked. Several hours later the milk tanker arrives to collect the milk and take it to the bottlers to get it ready to put on the trucks to go to the supermarket for you to buy tomorrow.

      The cows will come in a little later in winter. Which pushes the schedules for the tanker drivers and bottlers back by an hour. Now the bottlers who used to work 9-5 ar

  • If I remember correctly from history classes, the original purpose of it was to preserve daylight for farming. Think about how light it is during the summer time (at night).

    However in the current "Non Agrarian" society we live in, it make no sense. Having a 23 hour day and a 25 hour day makes certain companies have a nightmare for their computer systems. Was that hour ending 02 the first or second hour ending 02 (on the 25 hour day) or "what happened to 02 on 03/10/2013 ? Oh yeah DST.."

    It really doesn't

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      The farmer has the same amount of daylight to use regardless of what hour it is labelled...
    • Related to this, before time zones estimating what the time in another city was very hit-and-miss. Different municipalities simply set clocks according to the sun's position in the sky, resulting in utter chaos for railroads.

      As railways and telecommunications improved, however, timekeeping became more baffling. Each railroad would use its own standard time, usually based on the local time of its headquarters, and their schedules were published in accord with their own time. Some railroad junctions even had a separate clock for each railroad. The main station in Pittsburgh, for example, kept six different clocks. In 1883, there were twenty-seven different local times in Illinois alone. Railroad users were inconvenienced and confused by the lack of uniformity. The difficulty came to an end in 1883 when U.S. and Canadian railroads adopted four standardized time zones which replaced the multiplicity of local times.

      Daylight Saving Time: When, Where, and Why? [psu.edu] The adoption of DST was an outgrowth of the experiences with time zone adoption.

  • by NaCh0 (6124) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:09PM (#43120387)

    I can safely say moving your clocks is idiotic. If you want to work 8-4 or 9-5, it really don't matter at all. Just pick one and make it happen.

  • Just stop DST alltogether, don't go on it "permanently." That's just plain stupid. Businesses can have hours of 8-4 instead of 9-5, (or whatever) if they wish - but the government should just be out of it. DST doesn't save anything - it just screws with people's sleep patterns and causes missed appointments a couple of days each year
    • by sjames (1099)

      But inertia from PHBs inevitably gets in the way. It is actually easier to change every clock in the timezone than it is to get a sensible decision out of a PHB in time for it to still matter.

  • by geekoid (135745)

    Yes, it
    's worth saving.

    There, never ask it again.

  • We should just use standard time as standard time. Seriously, it is nice living in a place that doesn't adjust. It is always UTC -7 here. Playing with the clocks is silly. If we want to get up earlier or later part of the year, just do that.

    Also I really question if an hour either way makes any economic difference at all.

  • by Qubit (100461) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:11PM (#43120411) Homepage Journal

    Seriously -- let's just all use GMT, and get rid of Daylight savings, and all use 24 hour time.

    Want to schedule a meeting with your coworker 1 cubicle over? How about with your coworker over in the Paris office? Awesome: Let's meet on Monday the 22nd, at 17:34 via (insert voice/video chat system of choice).

    Time zones?
    Daily savings time?
    AM/PM?

    Ain't nobody got time for that!

    • Seriously -- let's just all use GMT, and get rid of Daylight savings, and all use 24 hour time.

      Want to schedule a meeting with your coworker 1 cubicle over? How about with your coworker over in the Paris office? Awesome: Let's meet on Monday the 22nd, at 17:34 via (insert voice/video chat system of choice).

      Time zones?
      Daily savings time?
      AM/PM?

      Ain't nobody got time for that!

      Obligatory Nationalist response:

      FUCK GREENWICH!

      lol

  • Screw DST (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tyler Durden (136036) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:12PM (#43120431)

    Twelve AM was set up to be defined as the middle of the night; 12 PM the middle of the day. (Or 00:00/12:00 if you prefer the 24 hour clock). Don't like how dark that makes the usual active hours during the Winter? Fine - switch the hours that businesses are active. But please stop arbitrarily changing time-keeping.

  • Chances of heart-attack were stated to increase by 10 percent on the days following the spring change, and to decrease by 10% "after gaining the hour in the fall" I've found a cure for all heart attacks! Set the clocks back an hour once a month! (I'll accept my Nobel Prize award in Bitcoins please).
  • by FudRucker (866063) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:21PM (#43120553)
    only the US Govt thinks you can cut one foot off the top of a blanket and sew it on to the bottom of a blanket will make the blanket longer
  • Health effects (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jeffb (2.718) (1189693) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:21PM (#43120555)

    So, heart attacks go up by 10% in the wake of spring-forward, but fall by 10% in the wake of fall-back? The solution is clear, then -- we need to adopt an official 25-hour day.

    The twice-yearly clock shift really is a silly, silly exercise. Not so silly as a uniform, one-size-fits-all, year-around schedule for work, school, and entertainment, but silly all the same.

  • The only time we talk about this is the few days around DST changing. No one actually cares enough to carry on the conversation longer than that. Replies to this are only allowed to include examples of people putting forth a real effort to get rid of it.
  • by SeaFox (739806) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:25PM (#43120619)

    One vocal opponent is Missouri State Representative Delus Johnson... He's sure that it'll increase economic development in the later part of the year; giving people a little more daylight to do their Black Friday shopping.

    LMAO.

    Ignoring the fact people shop indoors, where there's this marvelous invention called electric lights and they can't even tell how dark it is outside oftentimes, the real Black Friday Rush people are either at home on their computers buying online or had to go out and stand in line at the store all through the night to get the doorbuster deals anyway.

  • by coldmist (154493) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:25PM (#43120623) Homepage

    My wife looked into this, from a legal standpoint.

    Daylight savings is simply a federal standard for which days of the year participating states will change their times.

    Read that again.

    It's really a state-by-state issue, where any state can voluntarily not participate.

    Talk to your state reps if you want to make a difference.

  • by sjames (1099) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:40PM (#43120829) Homepage

    In January 1974, the U.S. went to DST early to conserve energy. It did mean we went to school in the dark. It also meant school kids had an excuse to play with flashlights (entirely unnecessary, but a good enough excuse and fun for the younger kids). It was a great novelty, and it was nice to have more sunlight after school when it was actually useful. Due to fear of kids getting hit by cars (in spite of the flashlights to make them visible), we went fell back again the next fall.

  • by PhotoJim (813785) <jim.photojim@ca> on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:40PM (#43120835) Homepage

    Saskatchewan permanently went on DST, in most of its territory. Saskatchewan straddles the 105th parallel so it should be in the Mountain time zone, except for the easternmost strip. However, in 1966, it went onto mountain daylight time - and stayed there. (Technically, it went off but changed to Central time, where it has been ever since.) To this day Saskatchewan remains on CST year round.

    In my city local noon is at 12:57 pm each day - solid evidence that we should be on Mountain time. But we aren't.

    It's a huge nuisance, to be honest, since television schedules, airline schedules, and meetings between people in multiple time zones change (and the habit of people who are really on daylight time to continue to call their time standard time can be very confusing - witness the Winnipegger who tells a Saskatonian about an 11 am CST meeting when she really means CDT - the Saskatonian will be an hour late because he'll actually attend to the call at 11 am CST).

    It would be a lot more convenient if the entire continent were ST or DT - but if there is all this evidence that DT has issues, maybe we should just, effectively, be on DT year-round.

    The stupid thing is, if we had 8-4:30 workdays in winter and 7-3:30 in summer, we'd effectively *have* daylight time. But society apparently needs government to make that happen.

    • I live in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.

      I can't say I'd ever want DST after growing up here. I'm 24 years in age.

      A lot of my family lives in Alberta, and I do a lot of business all over Western Canada. I can't say its ever really been an issue.

      Oddly enough, as ass backwards as some things are here, this is one thing I like about Saskatchewan.

  • by VAXcat (674775) on Friday March 08, 2013 @04:57PM (#43121069)
    My lawn is dry enough already! With the extra hour of sunlight the whole year 'round, I'll never be able to keep it alive! ;-)
  • by TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:05PM (#43121173)

    not really ancient, but its the 21st century and we don't need to change time for stupid reasons like saving energy or for farmers. Actually the farmers need for DST is a myth as well, so nobody has a fucking clue why we still due this.

    Saving energy is a farce because I live in Canada, so either the lights are on either in the morning when its still dark at 8am or at night when its dark at 4pm. Doesn't make a fart's difference in the amount of energy I use because we are screwed one way or another with DST. The majority of business and retail centers have lights on all day long, so who the hell is saving energy when dusk or dawn is pushed back or forward an hour?

    Not to mention Apple still hasn't gotten DST working properly on iOS, nearly every time change my alarms get all screwed still after 6 versions of iOS, I am hoping with my new Nexus 10 Google figured out that if ( 8am alarm == 8am current time) then ring the fucking alarm regardless of what fucking timezone or DST option is enabled, Apple hasn't figured out that logic yet; iOS probably has 5000 lines of code involved in figuring out how to ring an alarm to ensure it doesn't offend some religious cult or something by not respecting the alignment of planets or some archaic calendar cycle or something.

  • by kilodelta (843627) on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:09PM (#43121227) Homepage
    Would welcome Standard Time. If only because it'd be UTC-4 for us permanently instead of having to flip twice a year.
  • by acroyear (5882) <jws-slashdot@javaclientcookbook.net> on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:16PM (#43121311) Homepage Journal

    A few years back, the Russians went to DST-365(.25) - locked the clocks forward 1 hour and stayed that way.

  • by markdavis (642305) on Friday March 08, 2013 @05:21PM (#43121353)

    >"Representative Delus Johnson, who wants to end the watch and clock switchery altogether. In short, he says we should spring forward this one last time, without ever falling back. "

    I have been saying this for many, many years. Go on daylight savings and then NEVER CHANGE AGAIN. Give us light when we can *USE* it in the winter.

    The second best solution is to go on standard time and NEVER CHANGE AGAIN.

    But remaining on this INCREDIBLY STUPID system of changing time twice a year is just INSANE. It does NOTHING to save energy. In fact, it does almost nothing positive at all. Yet it causes tons of lost productivity, sleep problems, irritation, confusion, and inconvenience.

  • by Livius (318358) on Friday March 08, 2013 @06:49PM (#43122257)

    Daylight Savings Time makes perfect sense at higher latitudes, where there is little value in having daylight at 3:00am or 4:00am so it would be worthwhile to move it into the evening.

    But there is a cost and an inconvenience, and there are lots of places where the change in daylight pattern is not a sufficient benefit to justify it, and it's done mainly out of inertia.

    Sadly, the time change dates in the US are hopelessly unsuited to Canada, but Canada imitated the US rules because too many people have lives that revolve around the schedules of US television.

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