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Canada Government Transportation United States Politics News

Canadian Agency Investigates US Air Crash 84

Posted by timothy
from the sounds-like-a-law-school-hypothetical dept.
knorthern knight writes "When 2 light civilian planes collide in U.S. airspace in Virginia, the usual response includes calling in the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) to investigate and make recommendations based on their results. But what do you do when the crash involves two planes piloted by a crash investigator with the FAA and the chief medical officer with the NTSB? In order to avoid conflict of interest by American investigators working for these agencies, the investigation has been turned over to to the Transportation Safety Board of Canada as a neutral 3rd party."
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Canadian Agency Investigates US Air Crash

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  • Amazing! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by amiga3D (567632) on Sunday June 03, 2012 @05:54AM (#40200035)

    A rare moment of common sense for an American agency. I didn't think it possible.

    • Re:Amazing! (Score:5, Funny)

      by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Sunday June 03, 2012 @06:01AM (#40200053)

      Yeah, it's aboot time.

    • by jbwolfe (241413)
      Do you mean "an American agency" in the general sense (this I could understand), the FAA (again, I could understand, but this agency is woefully underfunded) or specifically the the NTSB (the agency solely and independently responsible for investigating this accident)? The NTSB, though not perfect, has an excellent reputation for "an American agency", and IMHO has historically demonstrated considerable "common sense". Their recommendations, however are too often ignored or delayed by political maneuvering.
    • Re:Amazing! (Score:4, Insightful)

      by CrowdedBrainzzzsand9 (2000224) on Sunday June 03, 2012 @02:47PM (#40202989)

      Kind of heart-warming. Americans genuinely like Canadians and share a relatively peaceful border with them. Conflicts are few...the odd fishing-rights shouting matches and, well, ice-hockey skirmishes. Fairly rare on the planet.

  • I am surprised that they didn't get the TSA to do it...

    [/SARCASM] (added just in case someone can't see the humour in this)

  • by SageMusings (463344) on Sunday June 03, 2012 @12:19PM (#40201979) Journal

    Now, I would like to see a disinterested, neutral 3rd-party investigate the rest of our three-letter-agencies.

    I'd also like to see that same level of oversight on three branches of our Government.

    • by identity0 (77976)

      Or regular local police as well. How often do you hear of a police-involved shooting being investigated by the same agency that was involved?

  • by Kernel Kurtz (182424) on Sunday June 03, 2012 @02:47PM (#40202991) Homepage
    They are, in effect, the safety police.

    Just like any other police force, they should never be allowed to investigate their own. Even having a separate "independent" police force investigate does not eliminate "thin blue line" bias.

    Picking one from another country is as good as it gets from an objectivity perspective.
  • But does anyone else find it funny (in a sick way) that the two agencies involved in flight safety had a mid-air collision? At that point calling in the TSB is like calling in the triads to sort out what happened between the crips and bloods :-) Somehow we need non-biased people in this incident but when it comes to professions we let them police themselves (doctors, accountants, lawyers etc).

    • > Somehow we need non-biased people in this incident but when it comes to
      > professions we let them police themselves (doctors, accountants, lawyers etc).

      Not only do you need an impartial 3rd party, they also have to have the necessary expertise. Who else do you know of who is qualified to and capable of conducting the air crash investigation? It's a specialized field with a very limited number of qualified people. And the vast majority of them work for either the FAA or NTSB.

  • by unitron (5733) on Monday June 04, 2012 @02:00AM (#40206363) Homepage Journal

    ...and there are enough worthy candidates here to burn through 15 easily, so I''ll just say

    ...the crash involves two planes piloted by a crash investigator with the FAA and the chief medical officer with the NTSB...

    is something even Clancy wouldn't think he could get away with as a plot device, even if he had dreamed it up.

  • Whoever ponies up a double double with a maple dip donut wins this one.

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