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Healthcare Reform Act Prediction Market

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  • by martin-boundary (547041) on Tuesday April 03, 2012 @07:54PM (#39567061)
    The first known bubble occurred in 1637 over tulips [wikipedia.org], when the US federal government was still considered a very remote possibility.
  • Re:prediction (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 03, 2012 @08:05PM (#39567183)

    I live in Massachusetts. Based on when Romney-care went into effect, you're 100% correct.

    I personally know people who were forced out of the state because their employer simply couldn't afford to buy them health care, and they couldn't afford to buy it on their current salary.

    End result: they're out a job, and were forced to move to a state with sane laws.

    Oh, and other fun factoids from Romneycare: when it went into effect, emergency room care skyrocketed, and the number of people able to see their doctors (and, therefore, receive preventative care) plummeted. It had exactly the opposite of the intended effect. I think 2011 was the first year since Romneycare that the number of people being treated by the emergency room stayed STABLE, let alone dropped. However, even so, the number of doctors in the state has fallen as they've fled the results of state-run health care.

    Now I should give Romney partial credit: Romneycare, as implemented, isn't his plan. It's his plan after being butchered the Democrat party. Plus, when he originally proposed it, it hadn't been tried and proven to fail before. By the time Obama copy-pasted it, Massachusetts had already proven it to be a horrible idea. And that's ignoring things like the Massachusetts law being Constitutional while Obama thinks of the Constitution as "mere words."

  • by rjh (40933) <rjh@sixdemonbag.org> on Tuesday April 03, 2012 @09:53PM (#39567881)

    Either go to a common law based system (the French have that...)

    The French do not use the Common Law system. They use the Civil Law system, which is derived from the Napoleonic Code, which is derived from the Code of Justinian, which actually dates from well before the fall of the Roman Empire.

    The United Kingdom uses the Common Law system.

    The United States uses both. The federal system uses Common Law, as do most of the states: but Louisiana in particular uses a Civil Law-based system, in keeping with its heavily French heritage.

    I don't see that either one is clearly superior. If you take a look at what comes out of Louisiana state courts, you'll see they're just as crazy as any other system. It's just crazy of a slightly different flavor. You might think that flavor tastes better, but I don't.

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