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25 Alleged Anonymous Hackers Arrested By Interpol 256

Posted by Soulskill
from the ddosing-a-jail-cell dept.
PatPending sends this quote from an AFP report: "Interpol has arrested 25 suspected members of the Anonymous hackers group in a swoop covering more than a dozen cities in Europe and Latin America, the global police body said Tuesday. Operation Unmask was launched in mid-February following a series of coordinated cyber-attacks originating from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain,' Interpol said. The statement cited attacks on the websites of the Colombian Ministry of Defense and the presidency, as well as on Chile's Endesa electricity company and its National Library, among others. The operation was carried out by police from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain, the statement said, with 250 items of computer equipment and cell phones seized in raids on 40 premises in 15 cities. Police also seized credit cards and cash from the suspects, aged 17 to 40."
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25 Alleged Anonymous Hackers Arrested By Interpol

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  • Fail (Score:5, Interesting)

    by xenobyte (446878) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:26AM (#39195341)

    What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

    Do they really think that Anonymous pays people for performing attacks or what? - They seriously need to look up what Anonymous is.

    • Re:Fail (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:54AM (#39195461)
      It's standard procedure in policing to sieze anything and everything for which even the slightest excuse exists. There are three reasons:
      - Because it's easier to take the lot at arrest and work out later what is actually relivant rather than get that done beforehand.
      - Intimidation value. The most miserable the suspect, and the more their life is ruined, the more other potential offenders will fear the police.
      - Profit! Much of the equipment is never returned even if the suspect is later found innocent, or even released without charge, and eventually gets sold at police auction.
      • Re:Fail (Score:5, Interesting)

        by gl4ss (559668) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:25AM (#39195573) Homepage Journal

        It's standard procedure in policing to sieze anything and everything for which even the slightest excuse exists. There are three reasons:
        - Because it's easier to take the lot at arrest and work out later what is actually relivant rather than get that done beforehand.
        - Intimidation value. The most miserable the suspect, and the more their life is ruined, the more other potential offenders will fear the police.
        - Profit! Much of the equipment is never returned even if the suspect is later found innocent, or even released without charge, and eventually gets sold at police auction.

        this is especially true in countries not so well off. like all the countries mentioned.

        also the intimidation value is for the suspect in the case.. so that he'll fess up and confess. because the chances are the cops questioning the suspects have no fucking idea what they're trying to get the guy to confess to!

      • Re:Fail (Score:4, Interesting)

        by gmack (197796) <gmack&innerfire,net> on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:29AM (#39195593) Homepage Journal

        Anon/lolsec made it much easier for the police to do this by bragging that they engaged in credit card fraud(used stolen card numbers for charitable donations).

    • by Pax681 (1002592)

      What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

      Do they really think that Anonymous pays people for performing attacks or what? - They seriously need to look up what Anonymous is.

      i know what you mean but it happens here in Scotland and, i suppose, in England,Wales and Northern Ireland and in the US too!
      the credit card, bank details and,in Scotland, items of value bought within the last twelve years. If it is proven that you are guilty then the resultant items can be sold as "proceeds of crime".
      i would however contest that there were no "proceeds of crime" in these cases as it wasn't some tax evasion, drug dealing, gun running or other profitable criminal activity
      it may however b

      • by Pax681 (1002592)
        argh.. damn my craptastic typage! a verdict of "NOT" guilty.....
        NIT GUILTY.. the fleas did it sir!" :P
    • by Shavano (2541114)

      Because there's usually a financial angle to fraud networks. They probably suspect them of using computers for.more than vandalism.

    • What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

      I have no idea.

      Also, shouldn't they be called El Anonimoto (or something), since this group only seems to be limiting itself to Spanish-speaking countries and Spanish-related current events?

    • by gsslay (807818)

      What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

      What does DoS and Anonymous have to do with the arrests? Anonymous is not an illegal organisation.

      These people were not arrested because they are allegedly members of Anonymous (membership in this case being a vague concept), but because they were allegedly involved in crime involving computers and communications. Therefore it is not unreasonable to investigate whether they were involved in computer crime involving bank account, cash and credit cards. The police would be foolish not to take what may

  • It won't help. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:34AM (#39195369)

    Legio mihi nomen est, quia multi sumus.

    • by robably (1044462) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:49AM (#39195439) Journal
      "Lego is available to all men, and what a multitude of things you can do with it."

      Those Latins, they knew a thing or two.
    • Choose your quote wisely.

      Then Jesus asked him, "What is your name?" "My name is Legion," he replied, "for we are many."

      And he begged Jesus again and again not to send them out of the area. A large herd of pigs was feeding on the nearby hillside. The demons begged Jesus, "Send us among the pigs; allow us to go into them." He gave them permission, and the evil spirits came out and went into the pigs. The herd, about two thousand in number, rushed down the steep bank into the lake and were drowned.

      So you are

  • by GmExtremacy (2579091) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:36AM (#39195373)

    Surely they've been completely defeated. What a good use of time and resources.

    Anonymous is a national security threat.

    • by Corbets (169101)

      Surely they've been completely defeated. What a good use of time and resources.

      Anonymous is a national security threat.

      Well, that really depends. Most of Anonyomous, according to your various news sources, consists of script kiddies willing to "bot" their PC out to a couple folks with actual hacking expertise. Despite the "we're all equal, there are no leaders here" mantra, it appears that these efforts are coordinated from a reasonable discrete number of sources.

      If they've got those sources, then the capabilities of Anonymous will indeed go down.

      As for them being a national security threat, no more so than your average van

      • by durrr (1316311)

        Obviously the coordinators need some IT security (breaching) experience. There is likely quite a few more than 25 of those however.

      • As for them being a national security threat, no more so than your average vandal or thief - but we toss them in jail, too.

        It all depends on how much effort and resources we're putting into it. Spending billions of taxpayer dollars to catch jaywalkers would be a complete waste of time.

        Of course, I don't think this situation is as bad as it is with piracy (so much time, effort, and draconian laws over people copying data).

      • Those ad-hoc leaders are transient though, so they'll have to lock up every skilled hacker in existence to take down Anonymous.

    • by Hentes (2461350)

      When the risk of participating becomes too high, most members will abandon Anonymous.

      • by durrr (1316311) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:11AM (#39195517)

        Anonymous is more like a publishing and public rage outlet. There's hardly a member card required for it either, if I went to some random secret document repository, tossed everything in a photocopyer, escaped and then published it as "Anonymous", all on my own, it's quite unlikely that someone would pop up to claim "Oh he's not Anonymous, we are!".

        The standard meaning of the word still applies even though there's a lot of internet and 4chan memes associated to it also nowdays.

      • by biodata (1981610)
        Anonymous is an adjective describing the 99%. Lots of people try very hard to leave anon and never succeed.
        • by Hentes (2461350)

          Which is why I capitalized it to mean the group and not the adjective, yet many are still keen to misunderstand it, preventing meaningful conversation.

          • by ultranova (717540)

            Which is why I capitalized it to mean the group and not the adjective, yet many are still keen to misunderstand it, preventing meaningful conversation.

            Seeing how both membership and identity of the group Anonymous is defined through the concept of anonymity, it is probably impossible to meaningfully separate them.

    • by Ihmhi (1206036) <i_have_mental_health_issues@yahoo.com> on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:19AM (#39195547)

      Anonymous is a national security threat.

      They are, but not in the way you or I would think.

      Are they a threat in the sense of "getting control of nuclear missiles by whistling over Skype?" Absolutely not.

      Are they a threat in the sense of making our government look as corrupt and incompetent as it really is? Absolutely, and that's why Interpol and the like are so hardcore about stopping them.

      • Are they a threat in the sense of "getting control of nuclear missiles by whistling over Skype?" Absolutely not.

        Oh don't be so sure, mister president...

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=fnd0qg4I_MM#t=113s [youtube.com]

      • Also, it's easier to capture a bunch of script kiddie front line 'cyber-solders' (I doubt they caught anyone of significance but maybe, who knows) than to stop the real threats like those coming from certain other countries that have organized crime funded teams or who have no boundary between commercial and government applications and thus use military tech to industrially invade the rest of the world.

        The real problem, of course, being that the western agencies are neither competent enough to go after the

  • Sad for the naive (Score:5, Interesting)

    by igb (28052) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:42AM (#39195399)
    There is something slightly sad about kids being convinced that their elite skills mean they are undetectable finding that actually national agencies are not totally ineffective. It's a sort of hacker Dunning-Kreuger effect: people who might be able to convincingly shield their identity on-line aren't confident about it and therefore take additional precautions, while those who are confident may find their confidence is misplaced.
    • by msobkow (48369) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:49AM (#39195671) Homepage Journal

      No, it's not "slightly sad". It's seriously disgusting that anyone claiming to be technically literate at all about the internet doesn't understand how easy it is to be traced by three-letter agencies who have the connections and resources.

      The people who got caught were egotistical fools, not "elite hackers."

      Hell, they aren't even "hackers" or "crackers" -- the vast majority of them are uneducated script kiddies and fools turning their machines over as bots to be run by someone else.

      • by igb (28052)
        I presume I needed <irony> tags around "elite".
      • by Hentes (2461350)

        What's really disgusting are not the misguided kids but the core that promised them anonymity, while knowing very well that it was a lie which have landed many of their members in jail.

  • Once identified them, they weren't Anonymous anymore. They arrested just hackers.
    • by PhilHibbs (4537)

      They weren't anonymous any more, but they were still Anonymous. You capitalise it, it becomes a proper noun.

  • by Gonoff (88518) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:53AM (#39195457)
    I have seen stuff recently asking people to let Anonymous use their computers for a DDOS on Interpol. In the past I have seen similar notices to DDOS other targets and have commented that it was a really stupid idea. This time, I never got round to saying how bad an idea it was.
  • hah (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @05:56AM (#39195471)

    The thing is that Anonymous is really just an idea. and as we all know, you can't just arrest an idea and throw it in jail.

    Yeah. Next, let's arrest a revolution, or a book and other stuff like that. Congrats for wasting taxpayers money!

    • by Viol8 (599362)

      Or perhaps you thought kidnap, extortion etc were instinctive? Perhaps in your utopia we shouldn't arrest any criminals because you can't destroy their ideas?

      Grow up.

    • by Shavano (2541114)

      You can't arrest the idea of driving too fast either. The arrests are for deterrence.

      Hoe is it that slashdot is populated with so many people who think messing with somebody else's computer is acceptable and shouldn't be a crime?

    • by halivar (535827)

      They're not arresting an idea. They're arresting a bunch of script-kiddies who broke the law.

  • by Sqr(twg) (2126054) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:06AM (#39195491)

    While it would be cool if they were an international police force arresting cybercriminals, Interpol is really just an organisation for information exchange between national police forces. The arrests were made by the ordinary police in the respective countries and according to local laws.

    • I just logged on to say exactly that. Claiming that Interpol arrested anyone is like claiming that the local police administrative clerk who happened to send/receive cooperation requests from/to any other police force is the one responsible for doing any of the arrests.

      So, the question which must be asked is who exactly is behind these arrest warrants? And why did anyone tried to pass the idea that there is an international police body with global jurisdiction that is dedicated to attacking this elusive a

      • And why did anyone tried to pass the idea that there is an international police body with global jurisdiction that is dedicated to attacking this elusive anonymous group?

        Promoting the idea - or in this case fear - that there is an international anti-crime bogeyman who can come get you across borders? I guess it's the same as many other "for the good of the people" campaigns: If we help just one kid say "No" to Anonymous then it was worth it.

        Fear of getting caught, and/or being punished, is a major deterrent to committing most types of crime. The more Anonymous related arrests the authorities claim to make the greater the deterrent to those who haven't decided to participa

  • by WindBourne (631190) on Wednesday February 29, 2012 @06:10AM (#39195507) Journal
    until they gave out information on the Mexican drug lords.
  • good riddance (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    filthy nosepicking miscreants

  • or compromised PCs running HOIC. I would be surprised if the bagged anyone of importance but they sure make it sound good.

  • Here is a short video of a lesson in a German school: http://www.dw.de/dw/0,,12165,00.html [www.dw.de] "Schulbesuch im Knast" ("Visit of a prison").

    The video is in German, but one can get the sense of it. Kids visit real prison, real cells, eat with real inmates. After that the romanticism of a crime diminishes significantly.

    Crime is not a game. The law is slow, sometimes very slow, but it will get one sooner or later anyway.
  • by J'raxis (248192)

    ...is Interpol's website down yet?

  • by Tom (822)

    ...for the next Anonymous statement.

    Seriously, someone said it very well recently: He thinks Anonymous is a small group of really capable people, surrounded by lots of wanna-be-hackers and teenagers wanting to be cool, basically the script kiddies of today.

    My guess is they've arrested a couple of the later. There are lots more where they came from, and we've been doing this dance with the police ever since the first (floppy-disc) copying parties.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137)

      Seriously, someone said it very well recently: He thinks Anonymous is a small group of really capable people, surrounded by lots of wanna-be-hackers and teenagers wanting to be cool, basically the script kiddies of today.

      My guess is they've arrested a couple of the later. There are lots more where they came from, and we've been doing this dance with the police ever since the first (floppy-disc) copying parties.

      People on slashdot will hate me for this comparison, but in effect Anonymous' structure is exactly that of your standard terrorist organization. Now, before anyone goes off on me, hear me out. In both cases you have a small, central core of motivated (ideology, power, ego, etc), persuasive leadership surrounded by a large, willing, ideologically motivated cadre and an even larger support base from which to recruit new cadre and derive support (PR, public opinion, money, etc). The leadership may identify

  • They weren't Anonymous!

    It's obvious - if they were, they wouldn't have been arrested. You can't find someone who is actually anonymous! Duh.

    Just how stupid are reporters these days?

  • ...is money in the bank for the people declaring the war. By treating an abstraction like "Anonymous" as if it were something fungible instead of the complex nexus of behaviors, motivations, and means that actually characterize the Anonymous collective, it allows them a lot of freedom to switch targets at will to demonize anything Anonymous does. It's worked wonders for the neocons with their "War on Terror" in the US. By declaring war on what amounts to a tactic, it allows the neocons to ignore the legitimate differences in methods and motivations between various anti-American groups, and lump them all together as "terrorists." To put not too fine a point on it, the "War on Terror" allowed the neocons to generate enough fear of being branded anti-American to get the heinous Patriot Act passed with just a single nay vote. Declaring wars on abstractions is turning out to be a very powerful political tool, and you can be certain that it will continue to be used by anybody who wants to accrue political power.

You see but you do not observe. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes"

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