Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Australia Politics Your Rights Online

E-Crime Police Raid Melbourne Newspaper 52

Posted by samzenpus
from the e-police-they're-coming-to-arrest-me dept.
beaverdownunder writes "Police from the 'E-Crime Squad' have raided The Age's offices in Melbourne today, executing a warrant in relation to an investigation following allegations of illegal access to the ALP (Australian Labor Party) database. 'Victoria Police E-Crime Squad is investigating the allegation personal details of Victorians were electronically accessed by a media outlet via a confidential political party database without authorization,' a police spokeswoman said. Last November, The Age revealed the Labor Party held the personal details of thousands of Victorians — including sensitive health and financial information — in a database that was accessed by campaign workers before the Victoria state election."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

E-Crime Police Raid Melbourne Newspaper

Comments Filter:
  • Witchhunt (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sociocapitalist (2471722) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @06:27AM (#38381410)

    Whether or not the allegations are true I guess we can expect such attacks to happen on any media publicist that isn't friendly to the government..

    • Re:Witchhunt (Score:4, Interesting)

      by martinX (672498) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @07:01AM (#38381544)

      The Age is friendly to the government*. Maybe they aren't friendly to the police.

      (The Age and other Fairfax papers are generally considered to be friendly to the ALP and the Greens. The ALP is currently in power federally. At the time The Age published the story, the ALP was also in power in Victoria, though they were recently replaced there by the Liberals. The story was about the state ALP database, though it is widely acknowledged that the Libs also use a database system to collate information they gather from correspondence and surveys.)

      • Re:Witchhunt (Score:4, Interesting)

        by rust627 (1072296) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @07:16AM (#38381604)

        The age is generally considered to be unfriendly by whichever party is in power although the general perception is that they tip the scales a little towards the ALP (Labour Party)

        However, the Liberal (read Conservative) Party is in power in the state of Victoria, so even by your logic, even though they are 'Friendly' to the Federal Government, They are considered 'unfriendly' to the state government.

        as someone once said, "The best laid plans of mice and men are filed away around here somewhere......"

        • by wisty (1335733)

          Adapting off Yes, Minister:

          The Herald Sun and The Daily Telegraph are read by people who think they run the country; The Age is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Australian is read by the people who actually do run the country; The Sydney Morning Herald is read by the wives of the people who run the country; The Australian Financial Review is read by people who own the country; The Green Left Weekly is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; and Llo

        • by wisty (1335733)

          Adapting off Yes, Minister:

          The Herald Sun and The Daily Telegraph are read by people who think they run the country; The Age is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Australian is read by the people who actually do run the country; The Sydney Morning Herald is read by the wives of the people who run the country; The Australian Financial Review is read by people who own the country; The Green Left Weekly is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; and Llo

      • a turf war fought through other means?
        http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-11-23/holmes-hacking-scandal-overblown/3687192 [abc.net.au]

        "As recently as last Friday, The Australian featured a front page story by its media diarist, Nick Leys, sub-headed, in lurid red, "The Age Hacking Scandal". It's a story which The Australian and the Melbourne Herald Sun have been following off and on for months. To read about it in those newspapers, you would think that this is a case of 'hacking' similar to the News of the World phone-hacki

  • Police raids involving data are like eviction from physical buildings and should be done with some guarantee, but I can't say if they were right or too harsh from here. OTOH a database with such data ought to be encrypted and put offline short after it is not needed.

  • by ibsteve2u (1184603) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @06:35AM (#38381440)
    Ain't nothing that says "Labor Party held the personal details of thousands of Victorians" like a police raid because it is apparent that the Age had to have accessed that data to know about it.
    • by martinX (672498)

      The ALP acknowledges it. The Libs have a similar database. This is like the filing cabinet for correspondence in the local member's office, but electronic.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 15, 2011 @06:43AM (#38381482)

    This is hilarious. There have been many reports of hundreds of cases of corruption in the Commonwealth Public Service which the AFP has refused to investigate.

    http://www.smh.com.au/national/public-service-keeps-fraud-cases-private-20110923-1kpdr.html

    http://www.smh.com.au/national/corruption-claims-dog-foreign-bureaucrats-20110923-1kpc7.html

    http://www.smh.com.au/national/federal-agencies-lack-firepower-to-deal-with-fraud-20111003-1l5dt.html

    A guy reported corruption in the reserve bank but the AFP wouldn't investigate until he went on TV and forced them. Even now the Reserve Bank is being dragged to an investigation kicking and screaming.

    http://www.smh.com.au/business/reserve-officials-in-evidence-coverup-20111004-1l7dr.html

    http://www.theage.com.au/national/fresh-corruption-claims-rattle-rba-20111123-1nv2l.html

    http://www.theage.com.au/national/rba-scandal-to-force-bribery-law-change-20110702-1gw9t.html

    But the Labor Party has a leak and suddenly the cops are raiding the newspapers. What a joke!

  • by MichaelSmith (789609) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @07:10AM (#38381582) Homepage Journal

    Well The Age are claiming that a whistle blower from the ALP logged them in to the database [theage.com.au], so they didn't use stolen credentials and can't be be said to have stolen the information. I think they were pretty silly to access the database from their office systems. If they had viewed the database from the home of their informant would a case exist at all?

    • by SJ2000 (1128057)
      If that's the case, Unauthorised access to or modification of restricted data [austlii.edu.au] requires states "A person who-causes any unauthorised access to or modification of restricted data held in a computer; and... knows that the access or modification is unauthorised; and... intends to cause the access or modification- is guilty of an offence"
      Doesn't causation indicate that the whistleblower is the one who committed an offence against this section? Not the paper?
      • by stiggle (649614)

        But in order to find out who the whistleblower is they need the reporters info.
        They probably used a multi-user shared login account into the database so they can't identify the whistleblower by their login details.

        • by EasyTarget (43516)

          They probably used a multi-user shared login account into the database

          I suspect that 'mediareps@*' had no password and very open privileges.

          Like the US diplomatic papers the idea behind this sort of Db is that it's widely and easily accessible to those 'on message' but hidden and secret to 'enemies'.

    • by mjwx (966435)

      Well The Age are claiming that a whistle blower from the ALP logged them in to the database [theage.com.au], so they didn't use stolen credentials and can't be be said to have stolen the information. I think they were pretty silly to access the database from their office systems. If they had viewed the database from the home of their informant would a case exist at all?

      Just as illegal as if they actually gained the credentials illegally in Oz.

      Unauthorised access is still unauthorised access regardless of if the person who gained the credentials gained them via legal means, they were still used illegally.

      Now if they had of been given the information, not the credentials by the alleged "whistle blower" (sarcastic air quotes) they might have a leg to stand on. Even in the home of the informant, they are still expected to do the right thing and not rifle through someone

  • Injuction made (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Xiroth (917768) on Thursday December 15, 2011 @07:51AM (#38381690)

    The latest is that The Age has prevented the police from taking the computers through legal injunction [theage.com.au]. Nice to see that occasionally this kind of madness can be stopped sometimes.

  • Am I the only one who saw the "allegation personal details of Victorians " bit and thought , 'but whats the deal they'll all be long dead by now'..before I read the whole article and realized it meant present day Australians , and not people living in 19th century Britain? Yes? Fair enough
  • ...at least they had a warrant unlike some other countries we know...

  • "E-Crime Squad" Yes!!!! It can continue for another 20 years.

Wherever you go...There you are. - Buckaroo Banzai

Working...