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United States Government Politics

Voters In Many States Must Register By October 6 182

Posted by kdawson
from the there-is-no-late dept.
Will F. Johnston writes "Voters in AK, AR, AZ, CO, DC, FL, GA, HI, IN, KY, LA, MI, MS, OH, PA, TN, TX, and VA must register to vote by tomorrow, October 6, in order to vote in November. Other deadlines coming up soon: IL and NM are October 7. MT is Oct. 6, but you can do same-day registration at the elections office. UT is also Oct. 6, but you can register in person until the 20th."
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Voters In Many States Must Register By October 6

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  • by Hulkster (722642) on Monday October 06, 2008 @02:13AM (#25270237) Homepage
    Hulk for President! [komar.org]

    Vote here [komar.org] for the SMASHING Big Green Guy because you don't want to make him angry - you wouldn't like him when he is angry ... ;-)
    • by Cyberax (705495)

      Why not Cthulhu (http://www.cthulhu.org/)?

      He's certainly less evil than the current president.

  • Please (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Apple Acolyte (517892) on Monday October 06, 2008 @02:14AM (#25270243)
    only register and vote if you have an intelligent vote to cast!
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Alternative: find the stupidest person you know, find out who he or she is voting for, then register with the specific intent to counter that vote with your own.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by DrLang21 (900992)
        This is poor logic. Stupid people do not vote based on any intelligable information, and therefore it can not be assumed that they are not voting for the most qualified candidate. Instead, you should make the decision for them. Find out who they are voting for, and if it is in opposition to your informed decision, hit them with your car right before election day. Since people with informed decisions will be voting for a variety of candidates, this line of reasoning has the benefit of simply removing all
      • by T.E.D. (34228)

        Alternative: find the stupidest person you know, find out who he or she is voting for, then ... counter that vote with your own.

        Hmmm...I wonder who George W is voting for?

    • Looking at the options[0], it looks like, to paraphrase Joshua, the only intelligent move is not to vote.

      [0]Term used very, very loosely.

      • Looking at the options[0], it looks like, to paraphrase Joshua, the only intelligent move is not to vote.

        Or to paraphrase Henry Rollins, "You're never going to be able to vote for your president the way you'd vote for your favorite rock star. It just isn't going to happen. Instead, you need to use your vote against the guy you don't like. Maybe the next guy will be good, maybe he won't, but at least you're working to changing what's wrong now."

        • The problem with that logic, with all due respect to Mr. Rollins, is that "lesser evil" voting doesn't work to change what's wrong now, since it's a huge part of what is wrong.

    • by scenestar (828656) * on Monday October 06, 2008 @09:12AM (#25272143) Homepage Journal

      Mccain 08!

    • by drsquare (530038)

      only register and vote if you have an intelligent vote to cast!

      And of course by intelligent vote, you mean a vote for your preferred candidate?

  • "Voters in AK, AR, AZ, CO, DC, FL, GA, HI, IN, KY, LA, MI, MS, OH, PA, TN, TX, and VA must register to vote by tomorrow, October 6, in order to vote in November.

    What kind of shitty vote-rigging software are they using?! November is over three weeks away ffs!

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by SpacePunk (17960)

      In most states, you can still vote Republican even if your address is a cemetary.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Artraze (600366)

      The only sympathy I have is for people who turn 18 between now and then. People who are just registering now (again, unless then just came of age) are demonstrating a clear lack of interest in politics in general and are voting only because of the hyped campaign and the "get out the vote" efforts. Hell, they didn't even register to vote in primary. I registered to vote less than a month after I turned 18 because I care about these things (including primaries). Did you know that primaries frequently dec

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by icebrain (944107)

        Err, you can register to vote before you turn 18, so long as you register within 6 months of your birthday and you will be 18 by or on election day.

        I know because I did it several years ago.

      • by DrLang21 (900992)
        I used to feel this way, but this year I have observed that Presidential elections are a great way to get people who were until then completely uninterested in politics to genuinely be interested. This is most effective with people who turned 18 between now and the last Presidential election. I know of at least one person who has flip-flopped on their general interest in politics and is now actually looking up what the candidates for local office are saying.
      • by pavon (30274)

        My brother has tried registering to vote here in Albuquerque twice (he is still registered to vote back home) with those folks that go around campus asking people to register. He has never received his voter card from the State Secretary so I guess they never bothered to turn in the papers (incompetent or malicious - you decide). A third person going around campus was insisting that he needed to provide his social security number on the form (yeah like he's going to give that to some random schmuck on the s

    • by mcvos (645701)

      Why is it even necessary to register in advance? Isn't every US citizen registered at birth/time of immigration?

      And does anyone know if there are any other countries that also require you to register in advance? It sounds very archaic to me.

  • by jarrettwold2002 (601633) on Monday October 06, 2008 @02:37AM (#25270345)

    We may be labeled ass backwards, but I think we have this one right. Registration seems to really screw with potential voters.

    • by inKubus (199753) on Monday October 06, 2008 @02:54AM (#25270405) Homepage Journal

      If you look at the history of the American democracy, there have been hyjinx in literally EVERY election since the start. There are stories of candidates sending wagons to the barrooms, and giving whisky to anyone who would vote for him. Registration is meant to curb the old "wheel them across town to vote again" trick. The problem isn't registration, it's general voter apathy. The thing about democracy is that the system only works if everyone votes. Luckly, we have layered upon the democracy a representative government, wherein you pick a good guy from your local area to represent you. The problem of course is that the good guy is most likely going to be more than 50% financed by corporations rather than individuals. Not always the case but often. Such is the state of affairs. 99% of the money in the hands of 1% of the population does that. The Republicans have moved from favoring the representatives to blantant corporatism--making corporations the government. It has been pointed out that this is exactly what happened in the 30's in Italy. It's affected the balance of America, because previously the subjugation of democracy has led to smaller government. Now, with democracy down AND a larger government (specifically homoland security), the political stability of the country is much lower. Now, we still have the 3 tiers, and not everyone in congress and senate has been bought by the immortality lobby yet. And really, the most important thing to you should be your local area. So, if you're going to worry about it, worry about local issues first, and move up as you go. Local can also mean on the internet, in your local network area (IE, your regular habitat). Be a leader and see the world change around you. Be a follower, and you'll see it change, but probably not to your liking.

      • by BenoitRen (998927)

        The thing about democracy is that the system only works if everyone votes.

        I'm glad that everyone has to vote in Belgium by law. Now if only the politicians would cooperate...

      • by rve (4436)

        Voter apathy isn't necessarily the problem.

        Western European democracies routinely have an election turnout percentage in the 80's or 90's.

        One of the result is a large representation for socialist, extreme left-wing and extreme right wing parties. In the US, this segment of the population by and large doesn't bother to vote.

        I'm not saying the poor, angry, permanently unemployed or xenophobic segments of the population should be prevented from voting, but before you actively start encouraging them, be sure yo

        • by mcvos (645701)

          Western European democracies routinely have an election turnout percentage in the 80's or 90's.

          Which Western European democracies exactly? Netherland usually has a voter turnout percentage closer to 50% (and even lower than that for European and local elections). In Belgium, on the other hand, voting is compulsory, so turnout tends to be over 90%.

          One of the result is a large representation for socialist, extreme left-wing and extreme right wing parties. In the US, this segment of the population by and large doesn't bother to vote.

          That's just apathy in a different form. They're required to vote, but don't care about any of the big moderate parties, so they vote for something extreme.

          • by rve (4436)

            The Netherlands usually has a voter turnout percentage in the 80's or 90's, pretty much the same as Belgium, except obviously in elections for the EU, which are popular only in Belgium

            http://www.idea.int/vt/survey/voter_turnout_pop2.cfm

      • I would agree that part of the problem is apathetic voters. However, I don't think everyone should vote, only those who care enough to know what is going on. Part of the problem is the people who start paying attention sometime in October and decide who to vote on based on what they learn between then and election day. Voter registration should be easy, but it should not necessarily be convenient. It should be something that the voter decides to do and then goes and does. Not something that happens when som
      • We are a republic, not a democracy. That extra layer, of which you speak is what makes us a republic. Republics work well, democracies are terrible - at least according to Plato.
        • by mcvos (645701)

          We are a republic, not a democracy. That extra layer, of which you speak is what makes us a republic.

          No, it's the lack of a monarch that makes you a republic. And lots of republics are democracies.

          • Eh, I'm pretty sure it's being run by "philosophers" (i.e. aristocratic elites accountable to the people) that makes for a republic, which is the ideal society. But it's been a long time, so I could be wrong.

            I defer to you if you've got some kind of expertise or knowledge...
  • by Tubal-Cain (1289912) on Monday October 06, 2008 @02:40AM (#25270359) Journal
    Kibo for President!
  • Lots of big battleground states.I know its cliche, but you can't bitch if you don't get involved.
  • Here in Oklahoma your registration application must be postmarked by this Friday to be elegible for the general election on Nov 4. If you live in Oklahoma, you can check your voter registration records with the state here [ok.gov], and download and print out a registration application here [ok.gov].

    For other states, I'd suggest getting information by visting this site [canivote.org]. Google also has a nice site [google.com] set up, but it doesn't seem to have my state's polling information loaded yet. Perhaps you will have better luck. There's a new Wi

  • ...allows us to walk in on voting day. Not only that, but if I'm registered, I can say "Yeah, he's with me!" and my friend gets registered on the spot too - no proof of address needed. It's like going to a popular nightclub. Except all the employees are over 55, and you're in an elementary school gym.

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