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McCain Campaign Offers Rewards For Turn-Key Comments 375

Posted by timothy
from the free-booze-for-edgar-allen-poe dept.
According to a story at the Washington Post, John McCain's presidential campaign is offering more than moral suasion to fire people up for a McCain presidency; they're also offering ready-made snippets of rhetoric for interested supporters to supply under their own names in public comments to online news sources and forums. Such pre-written commentary by itself is neither new nor necessarily nefarious, but it seems a bit off-kilter that prolific commenters are eligible for rewards — not just campaign swag like hats and stickers, but higher-ticket items like a ride with McCain on his campaign bus. Probably a script could be whipped up to compare the canned suggestions on the site with "grassroots" comments on political news sites around the web.
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McCain Campaign Offers Rewards For Turn-Key Comments

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  • What? (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:04PM (#24516483)

    Does this mean that people can now quote Fox News without having to deal with fair use rationale?

  • by Benanov (583592) <brian.kemp@member.f[ ]org ['sf.' in gap]> on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:05PM (#24516499) Journal

    As per the subject line, this is going to end badly.

    I do, however, find it interesting that this astroturfing is being done so publicly. Before the sources were always hidden, as if the originators seemed ashamed of it.

    Now they're acting as if it seems to be business as usual.

    Are party supporters allowed to have their own opinion these days? Anecodatal evidence suggests that there is a hive mind forming.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by db32 (862117)
      I had the joy of reading the current Republican voter survey thing. HOLY SHIT talk about weighted and loaded questions. It seems to me that the average modern Republican barely has a coherent thought let alone an opinion. (Don't get too full of yourselves you dirty liberals, we are all aware that you have opinions, you whine about them all the time, do precious little productive, and are otherwise full of stupid ideas.)
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by jimbolauski (882977)
        The Democratic one is just as bad, this country is made up of idiots and these questions are designed to fool them.
        • by Doc Ruby (173196) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:37PM (#24517105) Homepage Journal

          Link to this Democratic voter survey, so we can think for ourselves?

          • by rustalot42684 (1055008) <fake@@@account...com> on Thursday August 07, 2008 @07:09PM (#24518375)
            How about a link to both?
    • by Thelasko (1196535) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:12PM (#24516657) Journal

      Anecodatal evidence suggests that there is a hive mind forming.

      The correct term is groupthink. You need to get on the same page as everybody else.

    • by foo fighter (151863) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:39PM (#24517129) Homepage

      End badly?

      I recognize there are serious issues at stake in this election, and serious differences between the candidates. And we will argue about them, as we should.

      But it should remain an argument among friends; each of us struggling to hear our conscience, and heed its demands; each of us, despite our differences, united in our great cause, and respectful of the goodness in each other.

      How that can end badly? Especially since John McCain has a comprehensive economic plan that will create millions of good American jobs, ensure our nation's energy security, get the government's budget and spending practices in order, and bring relief to American consumers.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by pluther (647209)

        John McCain has a comprehensive economic plan that will create millions of good American jobs, ensure our nation's energy security, get the government's budget and spending practices in order, and bring relief to American consumers.

        Just like Bush did! Yay!!

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by delphi125 (544730)

        How that can end badly? Especially since a politician has a comprehensive economic plan that will create millions of good local jobs, ensure our nation's energy security, get the government's budget and spending practices in order, and bring relief to local consumers.

        I've rolled your comment back to the template.

        Congratulations on your ride on the tour bus!

    • It seems to me (Score:5, Interesting)

      by hey! (33014) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:53PM (#24517325) Homepage Journal

      that the McCain campaign hasn't quite adapted to the changes technology has made in politics.

      It isn't so much that his campaign lags in exploiting social networking techniques to its advantage. It's more that they haven't grasped the full implications of things like YouTube.

      Politicians have always tuned their message to their audience, but in a world of cell phone video cameras and YouTube, your audience is always potentially much greater than the people sitting in front of you. It's important not to actually contradict yourself, and when you get caught contradicting yourself the worst thing you can do is to deny it. The assertion, contradiction and denial make a nice little YouTube vignette. Especially if all three bits are delivered in your trademarked blunt, plainspoken style.

      This is probably why the campaign has changed its policy on access. McCain has always be famously accessible to reporters, taking questions for as long as anybody could think of any, spending lot of one on one time. This week they've switched, and now he's only giving scripted statements.

      This is more of the same. They're trying to feed their blogosphere partisans the way they feed their mainstream media henchmen, even though (ironically) you have to be a lot more discreet with that sort of thing in the blogosphere.

      I'm not saying McCain is necessarily worse than any other politician. Possibly Obama's just a slicker liar. Obama reminds me of Eisenhower, who had the gift of redirecting pointed questions in the direction he wanted the be questioned. For some reason, the television camera simply adores Obama; he's more relaxed and comfortable on camera than Phil Donahue.

      But whether or not Obama's the real thing, or the slickest phony in a generation of politicians, McCain has definitely let his ... shall we say strategically tailored representations of the the truth ... show plainly for all to see. This is stuff that would have gone unnoticed ten years ago, or it it was noticed, reported in words rather than shown issuing from the candidate's mouth.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by PopeRatzo (965947) *

        Possibly Obama's just a slicker liar...For some reason, the television camera simply adores Obama; he's more relaxed and comfortable on camera than Phil Donahue.

        Maybe the reason is that he actually is more relaxed and comfortable. When you don't have to sell your soul for a political office, it's much easier to be relaxed.

        I think this idea of the McCain Campaign paying trolls to place comments on blogs is reasonable, considering Senator McCain has not yet learned how to "get on the Internet".

        • Re:It seems to me (Score:5, Interesting)

          by hey! (33014) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:35PM (#24517913) Homepage Journal

          Maybe the reason is that he actually is more relaxed and comfortable.

          Agreed, by I'm not a jump on the bandwagon type; I like to keep one foot firmly grounded in skepticism.

          I think that Obama is rare, dually gifted individual. He's got the intellect to be a professor of Constitutional law, but he also has really strong people skills. Of course he's comfortable. Anybody'd be comfortable if their life experience told them they'd be able to outdebate or persuade most people they deal with. People gifted in only one of these ways aren't uncommon, but there's often a gnawing canker of doubt about whether they're on the right track, or can persuade others that they are.

          It doesn't make him "qualified" to be president, but those talents will stand him in good stead if he makes it.

      • Re:It seems to me (Score:5, Interesting)

        by uniquename72 (1169497) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:39PM (#24517959)

        It's more that they haven't grasped the full implications of things like YouTube.

        I think they're getting it now -- according to the Washington Times, McCain's YouTube channel has beaten Obama's 11 of the last 14 days. [washtimes.com]

        Even if he's just paying people to set around all day and click on his videos, it still makes for a nice statistic. Even if Paris Hilton crushes both of them.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by amRadioHed (463061)

          A lot of people have been visiting it because the ads recently have been so ridiculously bad. Paris Hilton, Britney Spears, and fucking Moses? Please. It's like a car crash, I just had to visit a few times but that doesn't mean it's doing anything to win my vote.

      • Re:It seems to me (Score:5, Informative)

        by bckrispi (725257) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @07:46PM (#24518781)

        It's more that they haven't grasped the full implications of things like YouTube.

        They should've learned this lesson two years ago. In 2005, Virginia Senator George Allen was the presumptive presidential front runner for the 2008 election. All it took was one viral video of him saying Macacca to tip his reelection bid to Jim Webb. One video cost him his senate seat, as well as a stab at the White House.

    • by Rayonic (462789) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:41PM (#24517981) Homepage Journal

      I do, however, find it interesting that this astroturfing is being done so publicly. Before the sources were always hidden, as if the originators seemed ashamed of it.

      Yet another example of McCain's openness and honesty. ;-)

    • by Original Replica (908688) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:47PM (#24518053) Journal
      Are party supporters allowed to have their own opinion these days? Anecodatal evidence suggests that there is a hive mind forming.

      Are the bulk of McCain supporters intelligent and informed enough to make an actual contribution to a political discussion without help? Apparently, John McCain doesn't think so. This is tantamount to telling his supporters "You are too stupid to discuss my campaign without help."
      • by Stradivarius (7490) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @07:49PM (#24518817)

        This is tantamount to telling his supporters "You are too stupid to discuss my campaign without help."

        Not at all. It's simply an acknowledgment that a full-time, professional staff which spends countless hours honing a message is probably going to be more effective at it than anyone else. That's true for Obama and McCain supporters alike - it doesn't seem like such a bad idea to encourage your supporters to make use of that professional work.

        Choice of phrasing/argument has less to do with raw intellect than with communications skills. I've known plenty of bright people who couldn't communicate clearly to save their life.

        And to be honest, political fervor is usually an emotional rather than a purely intellectual phenomenon. Just check out 90% of the comments on political website forums. If the "Spread the Word" program has no other effect than to get a supporter to calm down long enough to think before they speak, it's probably worthwhile. A well-considered argument or phrase - even if the considering was done by someone else ;-) - is usually better than a knee-jerk response.

        • by Original Replica (908688) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @09:35PM (#24519829) Journal
          it doesn't seem like such a bad idea to encourage your supporters to make use of that professional work.

          My problem with it is that sound-bites (or the text equivalent) are not political discussion, they are advertising. By adding more advertising noise into the forums where discussion should be taking place, this approach is dumbing down the voter's actual political awareness even more. By instructing and encouraging such a focused forum spam campaign, this distorts any possible consensus coming out a discussion on those selected forums. By contrast, here on Slashdot it frequently happens that someone makes a point that is embraced by the community, but is quite different from the stance of big media or the press release.

          If the "Spread the Word" program has no other effect than to get a supporter to calm down long enough to think before they speak, it's probably worthwhile. A well-considered argument or phrase - even if the considering was done by someone else ;-) - is usually better than a knee-jerk response.

          That is what I mean about McCain insinuating that his supporters are stupid, this "talking points" thing is most effective when the best the supporter can come up with on their own is "a knee-jerk response".
  • by SeanTobin (138474) <byrdhuntr@nOspam.hotmail.com> on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:05PM (#24516501)

    John McCain has a comprehensive economic plan that will destroy millions of good American jobs, ensure our neighboring nation's energy security, get the government's budget and spending practices continuing on their existing successful path, and bring relief to Chinese consumers. Click to learn how the McCain Economic Plan will help bring reform, prosperity and peace to America. Read More... [barackobama.com]

    • Not Offtopic (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Icarus1919 (802533)
      This poster is simply making a point that Obama has up talking points available on his website. Admittedly though, there is no rewards program.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:05PM (#24516503)
    "John McCain has a comprehensive economic plan that will create millions of good American jobs, ensure our nation's energy security, get the government's budget and spending practices in order, and bring relief to American consumers. Click to learn how the McCain Economic Plan will help bring reform, prosperity and peace to America."
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:24PM (#24516909)

      His $0.10 titanium tax doesn't go too far enough! Also, how will he guarantee enough brain slugs for everyone? Right now, they barely have enough to keep the Republican party alive! What will they do to guarantee our independence from foreign brain slugs? And they're definitely not doing enough to protect our right to own Doomsday Devices!

      I'm mad enough that I might register with the Apathy party, but I can't be bothered. Besides, everyone knows that the Hypnobama will win this election.

      All hail the Hypnobama!

      • by keytoe (91531) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:43PM (#24517995) Homepage

        And they're definitely not doing enough to protect our right to own Doomsday Devices!

        Farnsworth: "Damn straight! Today the mad scientist can't get a doomsday device, tomorrow it's the mad grad student! Where will it end?!"

        NRA Guy: "Amen, brother. I don't go anywhere without my mutated anthrax. For duck huntin'."

  • by randyest (589159) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:05PM (#24516505) Homepage

    not just campaign swag like hats and stickers, but higher-ticket items like a ride with McCain on his campaign bus.

    Huh? I'd sure rather have a hat or a sticker than ride in the same vehicle as some old guy. Have you smelled an old person? It's not pretty; like a combination of mothballs, fried bacon, a Catholic church, talcum powder, and the dust underneath the couch

  • by onion2k (203094) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:06PM (#24516517) Homepage

    If there's anything that will swing my vote at an election it's a comment posted on someone's blog. Policies schmolicies, I want to see what the public think!

    *goes to look at what the public think*

    Ok, I saw what the public think, and now I want the winner of America's Got Talent to be president.

  • by meta-monkey (321000) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:08PM (#24516545) Journal

    I don't see the "canned suggestions." There's a position paper, but it looks like the McCain campaign is just encouraging people to make comments and discuss issues on blog sites, not telling them what to say.

    • by Abcd1234 (188840) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:19PM (#24516803) Homepage

      Did you miss the Today's Talking Points links? Or did you actively ignore them?

      • by Javit (68742) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:42PM (#24517177)
        I checked the linked page (I know, I know...) after seeing the grandparent post, and do see the "Today's Talking Points" part, but I don't see where people are being asked to copy that text verbatim. Maybe you could explain why you and the Post reporter categorize them as "sample comments" instead of simply attacking the grandparent? I read them more as the campaign's take to visitors on the issues they'd like raised, and the arguments they'd like used, in the tradition of the talking points the major parties give their members of Congress.
        • by tobiah (308208) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:02PM (#24517489)

          I think you're right that McCain's site isn't suggesting they copy and paste the comments. The issue here is the rewards system, and perhaps the blog-targetting (specific blogs are listed for users to comment in).
          The WP article has some good feedback from politicos on the problems with this approach and possible solutions. In particular that the bloggers should be advised to use full disclosure ("I am a McCain action alert participant") and make sure their posts are relevant to the conversation.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by rtechie (244489) *

      On this page, the second link on the "Talking Points" section:

      http://www.johnmccain.com/Issues/JobsforAmerica/relief.htm [johnmccain.com]

      we find a list of bullet points like this one:

      # John McCain believes we should send a strong message to world markets. Under his plan, the United States will be telling oil producing countries and oil speculators that our dependence on foreign oil will come to an end - and the impact will be lower prices at the pump.

      The site doesn't explicitly SAY to use them in comments, but it's certainl

  • Oh man, too easy... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by SatanicPuppy (611928) * <Satanicpuppy@[ ]il.com ['gma' in gap]> on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:10PM (#24516595) Journal

    The trolls just write themselves...I'll attempt to rise above.

    Still, it's pretty damn pathetic when you can't trust your supporters to express their own opinions to the point where you have to give them your opinions to reprint.

    Ah fuck it. Lets burn some karma..."I guess all his supporters are too senile to remember what he stands for?" or maybe "He flip-flops so often that it's safer if they just cut and paste?" Maybe "Since most of his supporters are illiterate, it's the only way they can meaningfully contribute. Coming next month, a McDonalds-style interface with pictures of common attack points (a flat tire, little back guy in diapers, a black playing card, etc)."

    I am so sick of "talking points." It just reeks of brand advertising.

    • by eln (21727) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:25PM (#24516937) Homepage

      I am so sick of "talking points." It just reeks of brand advertising.

      Modern politics is all about brand advertising. Nobody really wants a serious discussion of the issues, least of all the candidates. You tell your base what they want to hear, you demonize your opponent in hopes of demoralizing his base, and you get your people to drive your supporters to the polls while trying to disenfranchise your opponent's supporters. If all else fails, you throw some ballot boxes into a river.

      The whole idea is doing whatever is necessary to get more people to vote for you than for the other guy. Glitzy advertising that paints you as a hero of the working man and your opponent as a clown (or demon) who will single-handedly destroy the country is a key part of the package. Serious discourse has no place in such an environment.

      On top of that, now you have the Internet to deal with. In this case, the more parrots you have mindlessly regurgitating your talking points on blogs and various forums, the better. It's like the hot chicks at the bar that invite you to hang out with them and offer you some expensive name brand liquor. It's viral advertising, and if it can be used to sell booze, why can't it be used to sell candidates?

      Sure, the whole thing is sleazy, but that's politics for you.

      • by hey! (33014) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:25PM (#24517809) Homepage Journal

        I don't think it's quite so simple.

        People aren't sheep or parrots, but they do have possess cognitive biases and flaws -- bugs in the epistemological software if you will. One of which is that if you hear the same thing from multiple, apparently independent sources, you will tend to believe it provided you have no prior opinion or more credible source of information to the contrary.

        But even though that is a timeworn strategy, it isn't sure fire.

        Look at the McCain's forays into attack ads. In part, they've been poorly conceived and timed. The Paris Hilton thing might have worked as the final smack down in a long patient campaign to cut him down to size. But it was over the top. People know campaigns say bad things about the other guy, so you've got to start smaller.

        Another factor is who you have to work against. People don't pay much attention to politics until it gets close to the time to vote. Nature abhors a vacuum, and you fill that vacuum with beliefs about the other guy. It worked with Gore and Kerry, but not with Clinton because of Clinton's charismatic personality. As a liberal Democrat, I'm lukewarm on Bill Clinton, in theory at least. Still I remember seeing him interviewed on TV a few years after he was out of office, and being amazed at his almost mesmeric powers of communication.

        Reagan was like that too; maybe even more so. You had to really detest the man to be immune to his charm.

        Time will tell, but I have an inkling Obama might be another politician of this sort. The McCain campaign is trying to define him, and the pundits are trying to turn him into a cipher, but if you watch him, what comes across is that he is completely comfortable with and utterly sure of who he is. Which doesn't preclude him being a cipher, of course, but that's not the same as being vacuum.

      • by porpnorber (851345) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:51PM (#24518121)

        At the end of the day, the thing that is broken about contemporary America is precisely this "do whatever is necessary" meme. Why is winning better than sportsmanship? Why should conservatives vote Republican even if the Republicans plan to destroy the economy? Shouldn't civilised people prefer to be able to sleep at night? Ultimately, isn't that what civilisation is?

        It makes no sense, but nobody wants to admit it.

    • by Chyeld (713439)

      Given it seems everytime he sends out his talking heads to drum up support for him, they espouse opinions contrary to his platform (ok, not everytime I'm sure, but it hits the press I read often enough). I'd say he needs talking points.

      Me, I'm waiting to see what Paris [google.com] has to say.

  • by TheKnightShift (1102767) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:12PM (#24516641) Homepage
    This is beyond pathetic. To think that a nation that produced the likes of John Adams, Daniel Webster and Oliver Wendell Holmes is now producing "leaders" who not only can not think and speak so articulately, but have to bribe their supporters with swag for copying and pasting soundbites... No, I'm not an Obama supporter either. I don't have a dog in this hunt.
  • give prizes to people to spread spam on your behalf !! now this guy has the makings of a good president.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:17PM (#24516785)

    The reason for them doing this is because Democratic supporters tend to be a lot more vocal about their support compared to Republican supporters. This may be anecdotal, but for the sites I view, I see way more Obama supporters spouting out campaign rhetoric compared to McCain supporters. At the same time, all the national polls I see have the two in a virtual dead heat. Why are we seeing more people screaming their support for Obama? The RNC has noticed this, and is trying to light a fire under the Republican supporters in order to get them screaming just as loudly for McCain.

    It's probably about the demographic. Republicans tend to be older, quiet, "don't rock the boat" types who don't give a shit about anything that doesn't concern them. Democrats tend to be young, vocal, "Change NOW!" types who feel that society as a whole needs to better function. It makes sense.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I suspect that while many Republicans will be voting for McCain, they are not particularly enthusiastic about him.

      You are mostly right about the demographics: Republicans do tend to just want to be left alone, which is not something which needs lots of verbiage, whereas Democrats' control freakery needs lots of screaming.

    • by halivar (535827)

      You hit the nail on the head. It's why we call them "conservatives" and "progressives," in the most non-derogatory senses of the terms.

    • ... it's that Democrats have more to be enthusiastic about right now.

      If I were a Republican, I'd be keeping a pretty low profile this election cycle too.

  • by mcmonkey (96054) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:18PM (#24516799) Homepage

    Considering one of McCain's selling point is supposed to be experience, why does his campaign keep making rookie mistakes?

    He repeatedly mentions his opponent by name in speeches and on his web site (why give the other guy free publicity?), he refers to the border between two countries which don't border each other, and now this.

    It's not stupid because it isn't done, it's stupid because people will do it anyway. Supporters (not just McCain's) will cut-and-paste talking points from the candidate on their own. A program like this just makes them, and him, look like idiots.

  • by Greyfox (87712) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:22PM (#24516881) Homepage Journal
    I was going to go for a funny comment off that page but I'm feeling a bit more irritable today. McCain and Obama are not being honest with the American people WRT oil prices. The simple fact of the matter is that the world can not support 350 million Americans, 1 billion Chinese and 1 billion Indians all who want to drive automobiles. Offshore drilling will not help oil prices. Keeping your tires inflated will not help oil prices. Any long term solution that involves everyone keeping their cars and driving every day will not work.

    The simple fact of the matter is that Some Americans will no longer be able to afford to own and operate an automobile. That process has already started. People are on the news saying "I can't afford to put gas in my car to commute to work." It's only going to get worse as gasoline gets more expensive. We might see the price of a gallon of gas bump down a little over the coming years, but the general trend is going to be up. If you're having trouble paying for gas now, you should start planning to not own an automobile in the future. America needs better public transit options and tighter knit communities, because a lot more of us are not going to be driving in the future.

    Of course Obama and McCain won't say that. It'd be political suicide. Unfortunately we don't need political grandstanding right now. We need sensible planning for a future where Americans are less affluent and have lower expectations than they did in the past.

    • So what? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by EmbeddedJanitor (597831) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:37PM (#24517093)
      Why the hell should every American be able to afford an automobile?

      Most Americans are better off than they were 50 years ago. Just most Americans have forgotten how to be frugal and now impulse buy all kinds of crap on credit cards then wonder why they're screwed when the credit card bills roll in.

      • Re:So what? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by ChromeAeonium (1026952) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @07:53PM (#24518849)

        Why the hell should working class Americans be able to afford an automobile?

        That's why. We have to eat, and get to work, too, and to do that, it must be affordable. Damn near everyone who says that either doesn't need a car to get where they need to go or can afford their cars (relatively) easier than others. Try seeing all the aspects next time.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by eoinmadden (769606)
          If you had decent public transport you'd have less need for cars. But some reason investment in public transport is deemed "socialism" and investment in roads is deemed "progress".
    • Close, but... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by RingDev (879105) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:39PM (#24517127) Homepage Journal

      The simple fact of the matter is that Some Americans will no longer be able to afford to own and operate an Internal Combustion Engine powered automobile.

      Fixed. There is a finite amount of all resources on this planet, so you are correct that at some point, not everyone is going to be able to do everything they currently take for granted. And transportation is going to go through some 'exciting' times in the near future. But the immediate impact is not going to dramatically change the life style of the vast majority of Americans.

      -Rick

    • by jayveekay (735967) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:52PM (#24517309)

      As you point out, to tell the truth would virtually guarantee the truth teller a loss in the election. The American people don't want to be told that things will get worse. They want to be lied to about how they can have cheap gas, low taxes, universal (but not zomg socialized!) health care, and a socially secured retirement at no cost. Whenever anything goes wrong, tell everyone they can blame it on "Washington Insiders", "Evil Corporations", or "Foreigners".

      Obama knows that none of this is possible. He's a successful politician, and successful politicians get where they are by lying to people. Obama is smart enough to know when to avoid telling the truth and/or lie.

      McCain is a liar too, as he is also a successful politician. They are more alike than you think. Obama is much smarter than McCain, however. So if you have to pick one of these two to be President, Obama is the better choice as he will screw up less once he is elected. Hint: Morons don't make good presidents.

  • ooh! I know! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jollyreaper (513215) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:23PM (#24516885)

    "Are you better off now than you were 8 years ago?"

    JOHN MCCAIN
    (picture of him embracing George Bush) http://www.thewashingtonnote.com/archives/mccain%20bush%20hug%20twn.jpg [thewashingtonnote.com]

    "Four more years!"

  • I have one (Score:3, Insightful)

    by kpainter (901021) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:23PM (#24516893)
    I think it would go over really well to say "My Friends" a lot. That makes everybody think you are telling them the truth.
  • by pak9rabid (1011935) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:25PM (#24516911)
    ...but he thinks Bluetooth is a tooth disease.
  • Yes! (Score:4, Funny)

    by RyanFenton (230700) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:25PM (#24516915)

    I could REALLY use one of those tire gauges!

    Here goes (Stephen Colbert style):

    McCain - he's hip! (at least none broken yet)
    McCain - he's got the energy to fix this country! (who better than the Maverick who had a hand in breaking things, but I'm sure it was all under protest.)
    McCain - Experience to lead, experience where it matters! (He knows how to cover his mistakes, and where others have their sins buried)
    McCain - Because Obama would raise taxes on real Americans! (The super rich face such horrible burdens already - they're the realest Americans!)
    McCain - He won't compromise our national security! (It's not the damn president's job to negotiate peace with UnAmericans)
    McCain - He's earned our respect, he's the leader we deserve now! (Certainly the change we deserve - stay the course! Four more years!)

    Ryan Fenton

  • by everphilski (877346) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:25PM (#24516923) Journal
    would never astroturf [talkingpointsmemo.com]

    (go ahead, read the article and google the name "Nikki E Sutton" ... she's a campaign worker [wordpress.com] for the Obama campaign.)
  • by fermion (181285) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:52PM (#24517295) Homepage Journal
    My Freely offered Blog entry. Copy as you see fit. I need no rewards.

    I admit it is a bit over the op, but if we are in a world where millions of dollars can be spent comparing a magna cum laude Havard Graduate to Paris Hiton, anything goes.

    McCain was not born in the US but is considered a US citizen anyway, unlike many who are born in the US that the republican party wants to consider foreign.

    As a proud third generation employee of the government, McCain is uniquely experienced to be president. His third generation military status uniquely places him to find the best government military solutions for every problem, without the distractions of diplomacy or allowing the free market to work. Like the current president, he entered higher education on a legacy, thus putting him in touch with the problems of the elite he represents. Also like the current president, he has a storied military carreer, flying planes around the world. At one point his plane got shot down and he no longer flew planes, but was kept in a POW camp. He was tortured for some time during the captivity. This experience wad apparently not bad enough to make him unconditionally opposed to torture.

    He also has a unique perspective on government medical care. As a third generation government employee, he has spent his entire life with free access to the government medical facilities. Although he is 71, and claims to be in good health, he experience has shown him that government medical care is not good enough for the general populous, so is absolutely opposed to it.

    Some might think a third generation government employee may not be the best president for a country based on free enterprise, but wait. His second wife, whom he married soon after divorcing his first wife, is the chair of one of the largest beer distributors in the country. As such, McCain has experience with the perks of the corporate life, like luxury corporate jets, which he used to ferry himself between campaign stops during his bid to become president. He understands the compromises that must be made when growing a business, like how many alcohol related teen deaths are acceptable to maintain a certain profit margin.

    As we can see McCain is uniquely qualified to understand the needs of the nation. The military can solve all problems. The health care system that has kept him so healthy is not adequate of capable of doing the same for the masses. American Corporations has special problems and must be given significant leeway in their right to earn a profit.

  • by scarolan (644274) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @05:59PM (#24517437) Homepage

    I think I'd be afraid to ride on that bus:

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/miami-dade/story/631908.html [miamiherald.com]

  • by vonWoland (615992) <dmitri@ m o mus.net> on Thursday August 07, 2008 @06:07PM (#24517581)
    is if I should write the auto-blog-comment script in Ruby or in Perl. I need a tire gauge, and that seems to be one of the prizes.

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