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San Diego GOP Chairman Alleged To Be a Fairlight Co-Founder 389

Posted by timothy
from the appears-to-be-the-case dept.
Airw0lf writes with a claim that appears too implausible to credit, at first glance: "If anyone remembers 'Fairlight' — one of the great groups on the warez scene, you may be interested to know that one of their leaders, Tony Krvaric, is now the chairman of the San Diego Republican Party." A similar report (on which the TorrentFreak story above draws heavily, and which is cited for the same claim about Krvaric made in the above-linked Wikipedia entry) showed up last week in The Raw Story. According to these reports, Krvaric is the same person known as "strider" in the Warez scene. I called Krvaric seeking comment; though he was unavailable, I hope he chooses to comment by email to help inform any followup coverage. A telephone receptionist at the office of the San Diego Republican Party acknowledged that she knew of the claims, but refused further comment, citing workplace rules. While she would not directly acknowledge or deny the truth of the allegations, she asked me to "remember, these are things that happened more than 20 years ago." Since some people have been penalized quite harshly (and some have been jailed) for the sort of large-scale software piracy that Fairlight enabled, it's interesting that Krvaric has enjoyed instead a meteoric rise in conservative politics.
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San Diego GOP Chairman Alleged To Be a Fairlight Co-Founder

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  • by Ceiynt (993620) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @03:52PM (#23316120)
    Well, at least someone with a crimal background is getting into politics rather then a politition getting into criminal activities.
  • And yet... (Score:5, Funny)

    by quag7 (462196) <deepspace@dataswamp.net> on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @03:53PM (#23316134) Homepage
    It still hasn't gotten weird enough for me.

    ***TRIAD*** for DEPARTMENT of HOMELAND SECURITY!
  • by blhack (921171) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @03:56PM (#23316190)
    The guy's defense is pretty good. Basically its something along the lines of:

    "Look, when I was in high school me and some friends used to trade video games with one another after school. Yes, it was stupid. Yes, it was illegal. No, I haven't been a part of that for a 20 years.".

    As far as his email still being @fairlight, that is also pretty easily defendable. "Me and some friends bought our first domain name way back in the early nineties. It was a bit of a novelty and *chuckle* we were kindof a bunch of nerds. I can assure you that I keep that old email address around for purely nostalgic reasons".

    TO those who think the guy should hang for this: How many of you would love the opportunity to make a difference by working in politics? Now how many of you can say that you've never logged into an IRC channel that exists for not-so-copyright-friendly reasons? Or downloaded some files from an FTP that you knew you weren't supposed to have. Howabout even set the date on your computer back a few years to use some shareware that was all the rage in the mid 90s?

    Even if this guy still *IS* an active member of fairlight, try explaining what the "warez-scene" is to any non-geek and see how far you get.

    And honestly, don't you all think its kindof nice to have somebody on the inside that is pretty clearly a technical person? Do you think this guy is going to have any trouble understand WHY net neutrality should even be a question? Do you think it would be hard to explain to this guy why what the RIAA and MPAA are doing is a ridiculous waste of taxpayer money?
    • by smooth wombat (796938) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:04PM (#23316322) Homepage Journal
      And honestly, don't you all think its kindof nice to have somebody on the inside that is pretty clearly a technical person?


      Yes, it would be a welcome change from what we have now. Hopefully the San Diego arm of the Republican Party won't lose their emails detailing how to do more regime changes [atimes.com].

      Do you think this guy is going to have any trouble understand WHY net neutrality should even be a question?

      No, he understands it perfectly. But that won't make the large donations from telecoms to the Republican Party any less important.

      Do you think it would be hard to explain to this guy why what the RIAA and MPAA are doing is a ridiculous waste of taxpayer money?

      Considering how much money my party has wasted these last 7.3 years, I don't think being fiscally responsible enters into the equation.

    • by p0tat03 (985078)
      Not to mention... If we're not willing to prosecute embezzlers, liars, and war profiteers from our government... Who are we to prosecute someone for *gasp* downloading warez?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by elrous0 (869638) *
      You don't "make a difference" in the Republican Party. Being a part of it is not a sign you're trying to do good, it's a sign you've sold your soul. Dick Cheney's daughter tried to play that "Well, I'm trying to make a difference" shit, even as the party steadily increased its anti-gay rhetoric to a fever pitch and sponsored more and more constitutional amendments across the country aimed at gays.
      • by dreamchaser (49529) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:45PM (#23316944) Homepage Journal
        I would tend to agree with the caveat that the Demoncrats are every bit as bad as the Repugnantcans. Some of their evil overlaps and some is different, that's all.
      • by Shivetya (243324) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:53PM (#23317048) Homepage Journal
        because it doesn't. If you don't toe the line your toast.

        Both of these so called parties is being wrecked by their fringe. Honestly I think the fringe does more damage to getting moderate Democrats into office than moderate Republicans getting in.

        Anyone declaring allegiance to either of these parties needs to be looked at... sorry, they make corporations look good
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Nikkos (544004)
        Both parties have sold their souls. For the republicans it's to the extreme religious nuts who are anti-gay, anti-abortion, anti-science. For the democrats it's to the socialists who want equal outcomes and lack of personal responsibility, they're also anti-gun and anti-science. (You don't think reduced expectations coupled with continuing higher wages and less accountability for teachers makes our kids smarter do you?)

        If you are that divisive on every topic, you're the exact reason America has so many
      • by Serge_Tomiko (1178965) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @06:07PM (#23317970)
        This is ultimately why liberals fail and will bring this country to civil war.

        Conservatives tend to believe liberals are wrong about human nature and the proper function of the state. Liberals believe conservatives are evil.

        Think about this long and hard. How long do you really think civilized society can continue when we have people like you shouting their mouths off how evil conservatives are?

        The answer is quite simple - it can't last. What is most comical about this is that I have never met a liberal who has any real capacity to fight a civil war. Not only that, your favorite oppressed minority of the day is not only a tiny part of the population but doesn't even reproduce!

        Anyway, for your own sake, I'd stick to slightly less inflammatory rhetoric. And, I live in New York City and know quite a few gay professionals. You know what? They are all Republicans. They could care less about gay marriage, but they sure as hell care about the hordes of morons on welfare and high taxes used to ensure those hordes vote for the whining Democratic candidate of the year.
        • by elrous0 (869638) * on Wednesday May 07, 2008 @09:54AM (#23323312)
          Oh yes, because Republicans NEVER villianize liberals. They're just thoughtful rationalists who would never resort to underhanded populist smear campaigns to make even the term "liberal" a politically poisonous word. All that reason and civility must explain why Republicans are so well-known for their pro-science stands, polite civil discourse, and highly-educated base.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by delcielo (217760)
          The irony of your post is really amazing, if unfortunately typical.

          Both parties demonize eachother with abandon. The bases of our 2 party system would be equally responsible for the failure of this union. The tragedy of it is that neither party base represents the people of this nation; but they foment enough anger and unrest that otherwise reasonable people end up in shouting matches or flamewars.

          Roughly half of this country is Republican and roughly half is Democratic. All of them are citizens of equal
    • by mcmonkey (96054) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:24PM (#23316606) Homepage

      Even if this guy still *IS* an active member of fairlight, try explaining what the "warez-scene" is to any non-geek and see how far you get.

      How's this: the "warez scene" that grows around the underground trading of software is like the "drug scene" that grows around the underground traffic of illegal drugs. I think that will get me as far as I need to go. Non-geek != idiot.

      Now, if asked to explain why a subculture that likes to think itself as intellectually superior uses language that sounds like something out of "Idiocracy," then I would not get far at all.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by statemachine (840641)
        How's this: the "warez scene" that grows around the underground trading of software is like the "drug scene" that grows around the underground traffic of illegal drugs.

        I see the picture you're trying to paint, but it has the wrong focus. Tony Kvaric was not just some impressionable young member, he is the co-founder of Fairlight. To correctly expand your analogy about the "drug scene," it would be as if Pablo Escobar [wikipedia.org] of the Medellin Cartel had come to the USA and become a Democratic Party leader.

        I'm all for
    • try explaining what the "warez-scene" is to any non-geek and see how far you get.
      Internet pirates, hackers and virus writers, who support terrorism through the distribution of violent paraphenalia detailing how to make IEDs, the very same kind killing our brave soldiers in Iraq AND hardcore pedophilia images too shocking to even describe.

      Think of the children!
    • by Hatta (162192)

      "Look, when I was in high school me and some friends used to trade video games with one another after school. Yes, it was stupid. Yes, it was illegal. No, I haven't been a part of that for a 20 years.".


      Well then, Mr. Krvaric, that should put you in an ideal position to understand the idiocy of hundred thousand dollar fines for copyright violation. There are tens of thousands of teenagers and college students out there who may well have their lives ruined because of a youthful indiscretion. Don't you thin
    • by Toonol (1057698)
      The problem is that all your points are voided on Slashdot by one consideration: The guy's a Republican, and there's an awful lot of knee-jerking going on here. Most people here have picked sides, and support 'their side' with the same unthinking loyalty normally reserved for sports teams.
    • by pragma_x (644215)
      I'm inclined to agree with you.

      Republican or not, you have to admit, it's kinda neat to see someone active in politics that has references on pouet.net.
    • by couchslug (175151)
      "TO those who think the guy should hang for this: "

      Don't hang him UNLESS he turns into an RIAA sock puppet. If he does, wrap it around his head like the proverbial
      "tire iron".
  • by jmorris42 (1458) * <`jmorris' `at' `beau.org'> on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @03:57PM (#23316210)
    Don't really care much whether the story is true or not. I'm sure the Statute of Limitations has run out. Hell, I hacked a few warez (nothing like what is credited to this dude though) myself back in the day. But Pirate Gumby don't fly the black flag anymore and I doubt this guy does either. Now if he is still active in the warez scene that would be a career ender.

    This is priceless watching the slashdot hivemind try to spin this story. If it were a Dem the groupthink would be "What a cool dude! This guy probably really understands tech and will be down with fightin' the power at the *AA." Put an R after his name and "Scandal! Look how tainted the evil Rethuglicans are, how dare they mention any of our scandals, most especially those related to our Obamessiah."
    • by Daniel Dvorkin (106857) * on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:11PM (#23316416) Homepage Journal
      You don't get it, do you? The sin is not, in and of itself, in being a Republican. The sin is the hypocrisy. The Republicans present themselves as the law'n'order party. Vote for us, they say, and we'll keep you safe from all those eeevil dark-skinned criminals and Muslim terrorists and hippie commie weirdos. Go to an approved church supported by your tax dollars, put no legal restrictions on the government, foot the bill for endless war, give us total control of your life, and in return the streets will be safe for God-Fearing Real Americans.

      It really doesn't matter that John McCain dumped his wife (who waited for him the whole time he was a POW) for a newer model. It doesn't matter that Larry Craig likes cruising for anonymous blowjobs in men's rooms. It doesn't even matter all that much that Rush Limbaugh had to smuggle Viagra on a sex tour so he could get it up for underage hookers, and it matters only a little more that George W. Bush was a cokehead and a deserter, or that Laura Bush got away with drunk-driving manslaughter. And no, it doesn't matter at all that Tony Krvaric used to be a major warez d00d. What does matter, very much, is that the party which builds its entire platform on God and Country and Traditional Values continues to embrace these people.
      • by Anonymous Cowtard (573891) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:21PM (#23316548)
        I'm definitely not pro-Republican but why does there seem to be this notion that people are hypocrites because they change their minds about things over the years? So if I do something I stupid when I'm younger and grow to regret it and speak against it as I age, I'm a hypocrite? Hrm... here I thought I was learning from my mistakes. Are we seriously no longer allowed to grow as people and instead are expected to carry the same beliefs, world views and approaches to life from day one until the grave with no hope to grow or change?
        • by Daniel Dvorkin (106857) * on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:31PM (#23316714) Homepage Journal
          So if I do something I stupid when I'm younger and grow to regret it and speak against it as I age, I'm a hypocrite?

          Not at all, and that were what Krvaric were doing, no problem. But that's not what he's doing; instead, in typical Republican fashion, he's blowing it off and suggesting that it must be Those Evil Lefties making an issue of it for Their Own Nefarious Purposes.

          From the Raw Story article:

          "Apparently there's a hit piece floating around on me, 'exposing' my wild high school, teenage years where I was in a computer club where we swapped Commodore 64 games (similar to how kids swap mp3 music files these days)," he wrote Monday. ... "I don't know who is spreading this," he concluded, "but just wanted to let you know what's going on out there. Likely it's someone who wants us to take our eye off the ball in 2008, be it the democrats, labor or someone else. Either way, we're not going to let them get away with it. Thanks for your leadership." ... Strider was asked in an interview if he had any regrets about his hacking days. "No," he replied.
        • by mcmonkey (96054) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:37PM (#23316806) Homepage

          why does there seem to be this notion that people are hypocrites because they change their minds about things over the years?

          Buddy, I can tell the '60s were good to you. Your concepts of time are completely warped.

          How is it "learning from mistakes" or "growing over the years" when, IN THE SAME SPEACH, Mitt Romney attacks those in the Middle East that are trying to establish nation governments based on religious law and then turns around and says the USA should base its government on religious law?

          How is it "growth" or "change" to attack Obama for association with a man who says wacky things such as the attacks on 9/11/2001 were punishment on the USA for past mis-deeds while McCain is actively courting the support of a man who says wacky things such as the attacks on 9/11/2001 were punishment on the USA for past mis-deeds?

          To say, my opinions when I was 20 are not the same as my opinions when I am 40, is not hypocrisy. To say, my opinions when talking about a democrat are not the same as my opinions when I am talking about a republican, that is hypocrisy.

        • by TubeSteak (669689)

          I'm definitely not pro-Republican but why does there seem to be this notion that people are hypocrites because they change their minds about things over the years?

          He's a hypocrite because he's doing a song and dance routine about his involvement in an international warez group.

          You don't have to be religious to believe that admitting your mistakes is should be a critical part of putting them behind you.

          He won't come clean about his past mistakes because he's afraid of the fallout.
          Avoidance of responsibility doesn't seem like a character trait you want in your gov't representative.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by markov_chain (202465)
          This argument keeps coming up that we should forgive people because the thing they did was just "something stupid" and a "long time ago." However, the thing about those "stupid" acts is that, in absence of other sources of evidence about what a person is like, they are very good indicators indeed. How many sheep do you need to see a wolf slaughter before you will stop giving it the benefit of the doubt?
        • by JustinOpinion (1246824) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @05:25PM (#23317478)
          I agree with you that people (especially politicians) should be allowed to change their minds, to say "I was wrong--with new data and experience, this is what I now believe." However you still must present a consistent view, and not be hypocritical. Some examples of consistent viewpoints would be:

          1. I engaged in copyright infringement as a teenager. I now understand that copyright infringement is a terrible thing, and should be punished severely. I should have been punished severely as a teenager, and I will work to make sure that everyone is punished severely for copyright infringement.

          2. I engaged in copyright infringement as a teenager. I now understand that copyright infringement is detrimental overall. We as a society should find ways to encourage citizens to respect copyright. However, we all understand that teenagers sometimes do ill-conceived things, so the law should not be overly harsh in dealing with these transgressions. I will work to make sure that copyright law is enforced, without its penalties being unfairly large.

          3. I engaged in copyright infringement as a teenager. I now understand that copyright is a bad law, and should be radically altered. I was morally right to ignore copyright as a teenager, and I will work to change the law so that everyone can legally engage in those activities.

          Any of those viewpoints is consistent (though I only agree with one of them). The problem is when politicians try to have it both ways. In this case, it seems like he wants to pass it off as some sort of small youthful indiscretion. That's fine--so long as you use your political power to make sure that others enjoy the same implicit forgiveness that you are claiming for yourself.

          It would be the height of hypocrisy to claim that this youthful indiscretion was no big deal, but then vote in favor of laws making copyright law stricter (or indeed standing by and allowing other indiscreet youths to be slapped with massive penalties when you were not).

          (Sidenote: For some people, #1 would only be consistent with the additional "...and I submit myself for the appropriate harsh punishment at this time." Whether or not there should be a statute of limitations on moral high-ground issues is unclear to me (e.g. a youth who is sued may still be paying off the debt 20 years later... so why shouldn't a 20-year old crime be punished?).)
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Kadin2048 (468275)
        Some Republicans present themselves as "the law'n'order party". However, you're making a mistake to treat all self-identified conservatives, or even all Republicans, as part of a uniform, monolithic entity. There are pretty deep schisms within the Republican party; actually it's pretty amazing that it keeps ticking along at all without imploding. (I have my doubts that it will survive with its current leadership intact if McCain loses.)

        There's a wing of the Republican party that's borderline Libertarian
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by LaughingCoder (914424)
        And it doesn't matter that Ted Kennedy killed the Cape Wind project off of Nantucket because it would ruin his view from his compound, and it doesn't matter that Robert Byrd is a former Klansman. And it doesn't matter that the Democrats claim to be pro-choice, unless that choice involves schools. There are myriad examples on both sides of the aisle. Face it, no one party has a monopoly on hypocrisy.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by rprycem (113790)
        You don't get it... I am the Republican nominee for Congress in the second congressional district of Maryland. Look me up, www.richardmatthews.org [richardmatthews.org]. I do not represent any of the stereotypes you just stated.

        I am for getting rid of the size and scope of our federal bureaucracy.
        I am for the rights of the individual being protected.
        I am for strict constitutional government.
        I want us out of Iraq ASAP.
        I want to repeal the Patriot Act.
        I think government has no business in marriage.

        I am a regular guy, a Slashdot
    • F.U. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by mcmonkey (96054) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:17PM (#23316496) Homepage

      This is priceless watching the slashdot hivemind try to spin this story.

      The republicans made an issue of what Bill Clinton was doing 20 years ago. The republicans made an issue of what John Kerry was doing 20 years ago. It's the republicans who like digging up people's past to manufacture scandal.

      So when it comes out a republican might have some extra-legal activities in his past, and the official response is, "oh, well that was 20 years ago. That's not relevant now." How is it the "slashdot hivemind" to notice the hypocrisy?

      How is it spin to point out that the republicans consistently do the very same things they attack others for?

      • How is it the "slashdot hivemind" to notice the hypocrisy?


        How is it spin to point out that the republicans consistently do the very same things they attack others for?

        Trolls say divisive things that are easily proven wrong.
        Don't feed the trolls.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Toonol (1057698)
        The republicans made an issue of what Bill Clinton was doing 20 years ago. The republicans made an issue of what John Kerry was doing 20 years ago. It's the republicans who like digging up people's past to manufacture scandal.

        It's the Democrats that made an issue out of what Bush was doing twenty years ago. Both sides do it. Don't be intellectually dishonest.
    • This is priceless watching the slashdot hivemind [...] most especially those related to our Obamessiah."
      Parent is obviously a troll.
    • REPEAT AFTER ME: (Score:5, Insightful)

      by spun (1352) <loverevolutionary @ y a hoo.com> on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:27PM (#23316652) Journal
      There is no Slashdot Hivemind.

      That is a phrase used as an ad hominem to try to discredit a particular point of view. Whenever you see someone use this phrase, it is a sure sign they have no better argument than appeal to emotion.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Toonol (1057698)
        Funny, since he was correct. Do you dispute the notion that the reception of the story here would have been substantially different if the story, all other things being the same, had the word 'Democrat' rather than 'Republican'? That fact alone should be cause for a bit of self-examination.

        Obviously we are not all part of a 'hivemind', just in case you are being overly literal. But there is certainly a lot of ideological positive feedback looping that goes on here.
        • by spun (1352)
          Bullshit, look at the moderation of comments here. He is not correct, and if this guy had been a Democrat, the situation would have been similar.
        • by Copid (137416)

          Do you dispute the notion that the reception of the story here would have been substantially different if the story, all other things being the same, had the word 'Democrat' rather than 'Republican'?
          Perhaps in general, but I think that in this case the Slashdot reaction to government intellectual property policy would trump even its partisanship.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mdmkolbe (944892)

        Whenever you see someone use this phrase, it is a sure sign they have no better argument than appeal to emotion.
        And that is also a phrase used as an ad hominem to try to discredit a particular point of view. Whenever you see someone use this phrase, it is a sure sign they have no better counter-argument than appeal to emotion.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @03:57PM (#23316238)
    But I never installed. It was a diffent time back then. We were innocent.
    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      But I never installed. It was a diffent time back then. We were innocent.
      Dude, it's okay to download, as long as you delete it within 24 hours.
      /puff, puff, pass, delete
  • What's his record? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Just Some Guy (3352) <kirk+slashdot@strauser.com> on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:01PM (#23316282) Homepage Journal

    It's not that interesting that someone with an unconventional past rises up through political ranks. The real question for me is whether he retains any of those earlier values. Since he knows a whole lot more about copyright than most, what's his take on the DMCA etc.? Does his political record have much to say about it?

    • by Al Dimond (792444) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:44PM (#23316924) Journal
      If a politician drove drunk all over San Diego every Friday after getting home from the bars we wouldn't call him an expert on driving. Why should we think someone is knowledgeable about copyright law just because he's violated it a lot?
      • Piracy is a lot more premeditated than drunk driving. If that politician organized fleets of drunk drivers, knowing it was generally held to be illegal, I'd imagine that you could consider them an expert on driving law. Especially if they never got convicted for having done it.

  • Those guys had some quality releases. Wasn't one of the founders of Razor 1911 involved in some political issues a few years ago too?
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by DigitAl56K (805623)
      Fairlight group have earned their place on my personal "heroes" list.

      Their demoscene releases [pouet.net] are really classy productions, unlike many other scene releases that are just a mix-and-match rehash of old demo effects. If you are interested you should check out Track One [pouet.net], Come Clean [pouet.net], and Media Error [pouet.net] as just a few examples.

      Captures can be found on YouTube if you have problems running them yourself, TrackOne may report a missing D3D .dll file. You can find copies of it in their other releases, just drop it in th
  • by should_be_linear (779431) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:06PM (#23316354)
    - I guess his primary objective will be to ban Atari ST computers.
    - I am glad for Fairlight but did Northstar made it to goverment already?
    - If he can program all Amiga specialized chips in his demos, he can run any city in the world easily.
    - I will vote him only if he promise free copy of Photoshop for all, with license key generator.
    - For whatever reason, his speech always ends with "Greetings to" section.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @04:23PM (#23316594)
    You all are missing the point.

    This individual is involved in picking what voting machines are purchased for the district.

    Electronic voting machines.

    Hackable electronic voting machines.

    If I was a Democratic party official I would be filing restraining orders against this guy having anything to do with e-voting systems... or even better, pushing hard for machines that produce voter-verified paper trails.

    See more here: http://www.bradblog.com/?p=5945
    • by nurb432 (527695)
      Like he would have direct access to them at all.

      Normally its a totally different agency that deals with the elections to avoid fraud, regardless if its paper or electronic.
  • A criminal going into politics? Where's the news?

    Look on the bright side, at least he kinda has to understand what he votes for when another law about "that whole computer stuff" comes up.
  • He's got my vote.

    And remember, you can never really leave the family.
  • "It's OK if you are a Republican."
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Everything you need is in the nfo, lamer!
  • ...it's interesting that Krvaric has enjoyed instead a meteoric rise in conservative politics.
    It is? Why? I am curious if the slaphappy author is even familiar enough with politics to understand one could more easily argue that there is no contradiction in the proposed scenario from a conservative position.
  • I called Krvaric seeking comment


    Clearly this story is a hoax. No slashdot editor would EVER stoop to -- well -- EDITING a story before posting it!

    The good news is, even if Krvaric doesn't comment on this story in time to be relevant, he'll have at least 9 more tries over the next month as the story gets reposted.
  • by spir0 (319821) on Tuesday May 06, 2008 @07:50PM (#23318928) Homepage Journal

    Fairlight were not just a warez group, but that is what people seem to remember them for now.

    In fact, they were one of the greatest demogroups [wikipedia.org] on the planet. They are even still active, having gone from c64, to Amiga, to PC demos. Here's a big list of Fairlight demos [pouet.net].

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